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Directory of Past Classical Organists


Extract from Cathedral Organists Past and Present
By John E. West
Published in 1921
Additional information from the British Newspaper Archive.

This page is still a work in progress

A - B - C - D - E - F - G - H - J - K - L - M - N - O - P - Q - R - S - T - U - V - W
Charles James Dare
c.1781 - 20th May 1820
Charles James Dare was assistant organist at Westminster Abbey until 1805
He was the conductor of the Hereford Festivals, 1807 - 1816.
It is recorded that his position at Hereford Cathedral was terminated as a consequence of an excess of alcohol.
He Died 1820.
Composer of a Service in G, which always used to be sung at Hereford on Audit Days.
There is an Anthem by him, "I will call upon the Lord," in the Music Books at Gloucester Cathedral,
Organist of
1805 - 1818
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Logo, Newspaper article Death Notices
On Saturday last died, in Castle-street, in his 39th year, Mr. Charles James Dare, late organist of the Cathedral this city'; his health declining from frequent attacks of the gout, he at length became victim its ravages.
In him are the public deprived man of genius and ability in his profession, his family and fiends of an honest man

Hereford Journal
Wednesday 24 May 1820
(www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk)
Henry Walford Davies
6th Sep 1869 - 11th Mar 1941
Henry Walford Davies was born September 6, 1869 at Oswestry.
He was a Chorister in St. George's Chapel,Windsor.
Pupil of Sir Walter Parratt.
Student of the Royal College of Music.
Assistant-Organist of St. George's Chapel, Windsor
Associate and sometime Professor of the Royal College of Music.
Conductor for some years of the Bach Choir. London.
During the Great War be undertook the organization of musical work among the Forces, and in 1918 was granted the military rank of Major.
Appointed Professor of Music in the University of Wales, 1919.
Composer of Cantatas, Church Music, Organ pieces. Orchestral and Chamber Music, Songs, Etc.
Organist of
Park Chapel, Windsor.
St. Anne's, Soho, 1890;
Christ Church, Hampstead. 1891;
1898 - 1923
Henry Walford Davies Henry Walford Davies
Henry Walford Davies

From the National Portrait Gallery, London, collection.
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Degrees logo1892. Mus. Bac. Henry Walford Davies
Extract: A short historical account of the degrees in music at Oxford and Cambridge.
(Williams, C. F. Abdy)
Thomas Henry Davis
25th Sep 1867 - 9th Oct 1947
Thomas Henry Davis was born September 25th 1867 at Birmingham.
Educated at King Edward School, Birmingham, and afterwards Mathematical Master there.
Studied music under Dr. Belcher.
Priest-Vicar of Wells, 1895.
Prebendary of Combe VIII., 1912.
Precentor and Canon Residentiary, 1920.
Conductor of the Wells Musical Association, Wells Orchestral Society, and Street Choral Society.
Organist of
St. Matthew's, Birmingham
St. Mary's, Warwick. 1892
1899 - 1933
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Logo, Newspaper article Death Canon T. H. Davis.
The death occurred at his home. The Liberty, Wells, on Thursday, last week, of Canon Thomas Henry Davis, Mus. Doc., Precentor and former organist of Wells Cathedral.
He was in his 81st year, and had been ill for nearly twelve months.
Mrs. Davis predeceased him in 1936. and there is one son and one daughter.
The son, Mr. Guy Davis, is County Clerk of Gloucester.
In the realm of music, Canon Davis was a good friend to Shepton Mallet, and members of the Choral Society learnt of his passing with deep regret.

Shepton Mallet Journal
Friday 17 October 1947
(www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk)

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Thomas Day
- c.1654
Also Master of the Choristers at Westminster Abbey.
In 1612 he was one of the musicians to Prince Henry, and when Charles I. came to the throne he served him in a similar capacity.
Master of the Children of the Chapel Royal, 1637.
Died about 1654.
Organist of
1625 - 1632
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Henry De La Maine
-1796
Son of Laurence Dc La Maine, a French refugee who settled in Ireland at the time of the Revolution.
Died 1796.
Two Chants by him are in Joule's Collection, and some Psalm Tunes in Weyman's "Melodia Sacra."
On October 28th, 1791, he presented a memorial to the Dean and Chapter, alleging that he had a right to a fifth part of the emoluments of the Vicars Choral.
Organist of
1781 - 1796
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Thomas Deane
He probably retained his appointment during the period of the Commonwealth.
In 1663 the organ standing in Gloucester Cathedral at the Restoration was sold to him for £65.
Organist of
1640 - 1668
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Abraham Dobinson
Organist of
1734 - 1749
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Michael Done
Chorister at Chester Cathedral
Organist of
1613 - 1614
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William Done
4th Oct 1815 - 17th Aug 1895
William Done was born October 4, 1815 at Worcester.
Pupil-Assistant to C. K. J. Clarke, whom he eventually succeeded as Cathedral Organist.
The degree of Mus.D. was conferred on him by the Archbishop of Canterbury upon the celebration of his Jubilee as Cathedral Organist, in 1894.
Conductor of the Worcester Festivals from 1845 to 1887, and of the Worcester Philharmonic Society.
Died August 17, 1895.
Composer of Church Music.
During Dr. Done's Organistship great improvements were effected in the Cathedral Services. A large voluntary choir was formed, and Oratorios were performed on special occasions.
Organist of
1844 - 1895
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Emily Dowding
Organist of
1796 - 1848
Dismissed for not attending in person and appointing a deputy
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Langrishe Doyle
- 1814
Langrishe Doyle was a Chorister in Christ Church. Stipendiary, 1775.
Master of the Choristers of both Christ Church and St. Patrick's Cathedrals in 1780.
Organist and Stipendiary of Christ Church Cathedral.
Elected a Half Vicar of St. Patrick's Cathedral, 1781, and a Full Vicar, 1784.
Also Organist of Trinity College Chapel, 1781.
By an Order of November 25, 1805, Warren and Doyle were made joint Organists, and a Patent was made out accordingly.
Doyle probably retired in 1813, as the books state that he was "licensed to be absent" in that year.
Died 1814
Organist of
1776 - 1780
1780 - 1813
Trinity College Chapel 1781
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William Frederick Dunnill
16th Mar 1880 - 28th Sep 1936
William Frederick Dunnill was born at Wakefield, March 16, 1880.
Deputy-Organist of Wakefield Cathedral. and pupil of J. N. Hardy, 1895-1898.
Organ Scholar at the Royal College of Music 1898 - 1902, studying under Sir Walter Parratt, Sir Frederick Bridge, Dr. Charles Wood. and Dr.
H. W. DaviesHenry Walford Davies
Henry Walford Davies
6th Sep 1869 - 11th Mar 1941
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.
Organist of
Christ Church, Surbiton, 1900
St. Luke's, Bromley Common,1901
Parish Church, Nottingham, 1903
1914 -
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Thomas Sanders Dupuis
5th Nov 1733 - 17th Jul 1796
Thomas Sanders Dupuis was born, in London, of an old Huguenot family, November 5, 1733.
A Chorister in the Chapel Royal.
Pupil of Gates and Travers.
Organist and Composer to the Chapel Royal.
Died, through an overdose of opium, at King's Row, Park Lane, London. July 17 1796.
Buried in the West Cloister, Westminster Abbey.
Composer of Church Music, Organ pieces, Pianoforte pieces, Songs, Etc.
Organist of
Charlotte Street Chapel, 1773.
Thomas Sanders Dupuis Thomas Sanders Dupuis
Thomas Sanders Dupuis
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1790. Mus. Bac. and Mus. Doc. Thomas Sanders Dupuis.
Born in1733, of a Huguenot family; was brought up as a chorister of the Chapel Royal, under Bernard Gates and John Travers.
He was appointed Organist of Charlotte Street (now St. Peter's) Chapel, near Buckingham Palace, in 1773, and succeeded Boyce at the Chapel Royal as Organist and Composer in 1779.
In 1790, the year in which he took his degrees, he formed the "Graduates' Meeting" for purposes of social intercourse between musicians resident in London.
He died in 1796, and was buried in Westminster Abbey.
A collection of his Cathedral Music was published by his pupil, John Spencer. He was an excellent organist.

Extract: A short historical account of the degrees in music at Oxford and Cambridge.
(Williams, C. F. Abdy)
Thomas Ebdon
1738 - 23rd Sep 1811
Thomas Ebdon was the son of Thomas Ebdon, quot;Cordwainer."
Born at Durham, 1738.
Chorister in Durham Cathedral.
Died at Durham, September 23, 1811.
Buried in St. Oswald's Churchyard.
His name is still to be seen carved upon a wooden screen in the Cathedral. This screen separates the North Aisle from the Presbytery, and is one of those erected by Bishop Cosin after the Restoration. In the same place is carved the name of Ralph Banks, who was also a Chorister in Durham Cathedral, becoming a pupil of Ebdon and afterwards Organist of Rochester Cathedral.
Organist of
1763 - 1811
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John Elbonn
- 7th Jun 1768
John Elbonn died June 7, 1768, and lies buried near the Western end of the Lady Chapel at Ely Cathedral.
A plaque in memory of John Elbonn may be seen on the external wall of the Lady Chapel.
Organist of
1762 - 1768
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Thomas Elliot
Organist of
1563
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William Ellis
- 1764
On being deprived of his appointment at St. John's College, Oxford, during the Rebellion, he established weekly meetings for the practice of music at his house in Oxford, which were attended by some of the most notable musicians of the period. A detailed account of these gatherings may be found in Hearne's "Life of Anthony Wood," or in Hawkins's "History of Music.".
At the Restoration it is supposed that Ellis was reappointed Organist of St. John's College.
Died 1674.
Some Rounds and Canons by him are included in Hilton's Collection, "Catch who catch can" (1652).
The MS. Organ book above mentioned contains three Anthems by William Ellis. Two of these, "Almighty God" and "This is the record of John," were evidently composed for the Feast of the patron Saint of the College—St. John the Baptist's Day.
Organist of

- 1646 & 1660 - 1674
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1639. Mus. Bac. William Ellis.
Organist of Eton and afterwards of St. John's College, Oxford.
He was expelled from the latter in the Rebellion, and made a living by holding weekly meetings for the practice of music at his house.
Wood makes constant reference to these meetings, in which many of the best musicians of the day, such as Baltzar, Mell, Wilson, and others, took part.
He published some rounds and canons in Hilton's Collection "Catch who catch can," 1652.
After the Restoration, Ellis in all probability got back his appointment as Organist of St. John's, since he spent the rest of his life in Oxford, and, dying in 1674, was buried in Magdalen parish.

Extract: A short historical account of the degrees in music at Oxford and Cambridge.
(Williams, C. F. Abdy)
William Ellis
13th Oct 1868 -
William Ellis was born at Tow Law, Co. Durham, October 13, 1868.
Pupil of Dr. Philip Armes at Durham Cathedral.
Sub-Organist (appointed by the Chapter) of Durham Cathedral, 1903.
Hon. Member of University College, Durham, 1917.
Choirmaster of Newcastle Cathedral, 1918.
Composer of Church Music, Etc.
Organist of
Elvet Wesleyan Church, Durham; 1887;(at thirteen years of age)
St. Nicholas, Durham, 1887;
Grammar School, Richmond, Yorks
to the Marquis of Zetland at Aske Hall, near Richmond, 1894
1918
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Logo, Newspaper article DR. WILLIAM ELLIS
Organist of Newcastle Cathedral Resigns
William Ellis, organist and Master the Choristers at St Nicholas's Cathedral, Newcastle, has resigned his position*s. His resignation takes effect next month, but owing important musical engagements at the Cathedral he will not sever his connection until the end the year.
His resignation has been forced falling eyesight. He has held office for 20 years. Dr. Ellis has always had this trouble. Alter graduating Mus. B at Durham University he was unable for this reason to take further examinations. However. in recognition of his work for Church music, the Archbishop of Canterbury in 1929 conferred upon him the honorary degree Mus. Doc (Canterbury).
Dr. Ellis, who gave organ recitals at the Newcastle Exhibition of 1887. trained under the late Dr Armes, of Durham and his first appointment was St. Nicholas's Church, Durham: later Richmond Parish Church, and was sub-organist at Durham Cathedral for 15 years before going to Newcastle.
In his younger days he was conductor the Richmondshire Choral Society and the Durham Musical Society, and was one of the founders of the North England Musical Tournament

Yorkshire Post and Leeds Intelligencer
Tuesday 23 August 1938
(www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk)
Arthur Elmore
1875 - 1932
Arthur Elmore was a pupil of C. W. Perkins.
Organist of
St. Thomas in the Moors
St. Edward's, Birmingham
1901 - 1906
St. Mary's Parish Church, Acock's Green
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George Job Elvey
27th Mar 1816 - 9th Dec 1893
George Job Elvey was born at Canterbury, March 27 1816.
Chorister in Canterbury Cathedral.
Pupil of Highmore Skeats (Senr.); also of his brother, Stephen Elvey, and afterwards, at the Royal Academy of Music, of Cipriani Potter and Dr. Crotch, Lay Clerk of Christ Church Cathedral, Oxford, 1833.
Private Organist to Her Majesty, 1837.
Knighted 1871.
Conductor of the Windsor Glee and Madrigal Society and of the Windsor and Eton Choral Society. Retired from the post at Windsor, 1882.
Died at Windlesham, Surrey, December 9, 1893.
Buried outside the West Front of St. George's Chapel, Windsor.
Composer of Oratorios, Odes, Church Music, Glees, Part-songs, Music for Orchestra, Organ, Pianoforte, Violin, Songs, Etc.
Organist of
1835 - 1882
George Job Elvey >George Job Elvey
George Job Elvey
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Logo, Newspaper article DEATH OF SIR GEORGE ELVEY
Sir George Job Elvy, formerly organist of St. George's Chapel, Windsor Castle died, we regret to announce, early on Saturday morning at his residence at Windleasham, Surrey, after an attack of influenza.
He was the son of the late Mr. John Elvey, of Canterbury, and was born in March, 1816. Educated in his native city, in 1835, when only 19 he was selected by King William IV. And Queen Adelaide from a number of talented musicians as organist of St. George's Chapel, and was subsequently appointed organist to his Majesty.
He obtained his bachelorship of music at New College, Oxford, in 1838. and his doctor's degree three years later. With Sir George Elvey one of the last of the older generation of English organists has passed away.
To most people his name is best known as that of the composer of the ever popular harvest hymn, set to Dean Alford's lines "Come, ye thankful people, come." and as Sir Walter Parratt's predecessor at St George's Chapel, Windsor.
His compositions were almost all in the form of anthems, some of which are still popular.
A march written for the occasion of the marriage of Princess Louise is one of his few instrumental works.
He conducted the musical portion of the Wedding Ritual at the marriage of the Prince and Princess of Wales in St. George's Chapel, and other Royal ceremonials. He was knighted in 1871, and retired in 1882, having held his appointment for nearly ball a century.
Sir George was four times married, his fourth wife, who survives him, being Miss Mary Savory, daughter of the late Mr. Joseph Savory, of Buckhurst-park, and sister of Alderman Sir Joseph Savory, once Lord Mayor of London. After vacating his official appointment be continued to take an interest in musical matters, and only a few weeks ago, notwithstanding his advanced age, personally conducted the performance of some of his own compositions, which were sung at the annual concert given by the St Georges Chapel Choir, in the Albert Institute, Windsor.

Reading Mercury
Saturday 16 December 1893
(www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk)

Degrees logo1838. Mus. Bac. - George Job Elvey, New College.
Mus. Doc. 1840.
Knighted 1871
Extract: A short historical account of the degrees in music at Oxford and Cambridge.
(Williams, C. F. Abdy)
Stephen Elvey
Jun 1805 - 6th Oct 1860
Stephen Elvey was born June, 1805 at Canterbury.
Brother of Sir George Elvey, Organist of Windsor.
Chorister in Canterbury Cathedral, and pupil of Skeats (Senr.).
Died at Oxford, October 6, 1860.
Composer of Church Music.
Editor of the work known as "Elvey's Psalter." His Evening Service, in continuation of Croft's Morning Service in A, is well known.
Organist of
New College, 1830;
University Church. 1845;
University Choragus, 1848
1846 - 1860
1830 - 1860
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Logo, Newspaper article DEATH OF DR. S. ELVEY.
Last evening died, at his residence in New College-street, after a long and painful illness, aged 55 years, Stephen Elvey, doctor of music, organist of New College and of St. John's College, and choragus to the university.
The deceased was brother to Dr. George Elvey, organist at St. George's Chapel, Windsor, and was elected organist of New College in 1831, on the death of Mr. Bennett, who was killed by the upsetting of a coach on his way to Hereford Musical Festival.
The deceased ranked high as a musician, and was much respected in the university both for his talents and many amiable qualities. He has left a widow, but no family.

Morning Post
Monday 08 October 1860
(www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk)

Degrees logo 1831. Mus. Bac. - Stephen Elvey, of New Coil.
Born in 1805, and educated at Canterbury Cathedral, under Highmore Skeats.
He succeeded A. Bennett as Organist of New Coll. in 1830, and proceeded Mus. Doc. in 1838. He was Organist of St. Mary's Church and St. John's College, and deputy to Crotch as Professor of Music and Choragus.
Crotch died in 1848 and Elvey succeeded him as Choragus, Sir H. Bishop being appointed Professor of Music. He died in 1860.
His compositions are an Evening Service in continuation of Crotch's Morning Service in A, and six original tunes in the Oxford Psalm Book, 1852. He also published "Psalter and Canticles, pointed for Chanting."
Extract: A short historical account of the degrees in music at Oxford and Cambridge.
(Williams, C. F. Abdy)
William Emes
- 1637
William Emes Died 1637
Organist of
(Wimborne Minster 1610 ?)
1602 - 1637
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Michael Este
(or East, Easte, Est)
1580–1648
Michael Este is supposed to be son of the famous printer and music publisher. Thomas Este.
Appointed Vicar Choral and Master of the Choristers of Lichfield Cathedral about 1618. Probably also took duty as Organist.
Composer of Church Music, Madrigals, "Duos and Fancies for Viols," Etc.
Contributor to "The Triumphs of Oriana. " A work by him, entitled "The Sixt Set of Bookes, wherein are Anthemes for Versus, and Chorus of 5 and 6 parts; apt for Violls and Voices," is dedicated to Dr. John Williams, Bishop of Lincoln. This worthy prelate, who was a perfect stranger to Este, had settled upon him an annuity for life, in return for the pleasure he had experienced in hearing some of the composer's Motets.
A number of Este's Anthems, with accompaniment for viols, were published by the Musical Antiquarian Society in 1845, under the editorship of Dr.
Dr. E. F. Rimbault, Edward Francis Rimbault
Edward Francis Rimbault
13 Jun 1816 – 26 Sep 1876
.
Organist of
(1618 - 1638) ?
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Degrees logo1606. Mus. Bac. - Michael East, Easte, Est, or Este.
His publications, which are more numerous than those of any of his contemporaries, consist of madrigals, anthems, and other works he contributed, in 1601, to the "Triumphs of Oriana." Williams, Bishop of Lincoln, settled an annuity on him in return for the pleasure he had received from hearing some of East's motets. Little is known of his life. He was probably the son of Thomas East, the music printer. About 1618 he became Master of the Choristers at Lichfield Cathedral.
It is not known when he died, but his last composition, a set of duos and fancies for the viol, was published in 1638.
Extract: A short historical account of the degrees in music at Oxford and Cambridge.
(Williams, C. F. Abdy)
William Evans
- 22nd Sep 1740
William Evans was paid £3 9s 6d. for a new Service composed by him and approved by Dr. Creyghton. which was entered in the Choir books.
An Anthem by him, "Unto Thee, O Lord," is also in the Choir books of Wells Cathedral.
Died September 22, 1740.
Buried in the South Aisle of Wells Cathedral Nave.
Organist of
1727 - 1740
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William George Eveleigh
11th May 1868 - 13th Jan 1950
William George Eveleigh was born at Meerut, India, 1868.
Pupil of G. E. Bambridge, Sir Julius Benedict, John Hopkins (Rochester), and Dr. J. C. Bridge (Chester).
Organist of ; Cork Cathedral, 1903. Conductor of the Cathedral Musical Society. Examiner for Degrees in Music in the University of Dublin.
Composer of a Cantata, "In Domino Confido," an Opera, "Valkyriur," Church Music, pieces for Organ, Pianoforte, Violin, &c.
Organist of
Holywell Parish Church, 1888
Holy Trinity (Episcopal), Ayr. 1889;
1903
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Degrees logo1890. Mus. Bac. William George Eveleigh, Queen's Coll.
Extract: A short historical account of the degrees in music at Oxford and Cambridge.
(Williams, C. F. Abdy)
John Farrant
John Farrant is supposed to have been a son of Richard Farrant.
He was probably the John Farrant who took duty for one year at Bristol Cathedral, and subsequently became Organist successively of Hereford Cathedral; Christ Church, Newgate Street, London; and Salisbury Cathedral.
Hawkins assigns the post at Christ Church, Newgate Street, to another John Farrant, but it is quite possible that all the above appointments were held in turn by the same person.
The Service—Farrant in D minor—which has been attributed to Richard Farrant, is the composition of John Farrant.
* This fact can be proved by reference to the Ely, Peterhouse (Cambridge), and other MSS., and to various old part-books still extant.

Organist of
1566 - 1572
1570 - 1571
1592 - 1593
Christ Church, Newgate Street, London;
1598 - 1602
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Richard Farrant
1530 - 30th Nov 1580
Richard Farrant was born about 1530.
A gentleman of the Chapel Royal until 1564.
Master of the Choristers (and probably one of the Organists) of St. George's Chapel, Windsor, 1564.
Reappointed a Gentleman of the Chapel Royal, 1569.
Died at Windsor, November 30, 1580.
Composer of Church Music. The well-known Anthem, "Lord, for Thy tender mercies' sake," attributed to R. Farrant, is more probably the work of John Hilton.
Farrant had an allowance of £81 6s. 8d. as Master of the Choristers of St. Georg's Chapel, for their board and education.
He resided in a house within the Castle, called Old Commons.
The office-book of the Treasurer of the Chamber, in the reign of Elizabeth, contains several entries of payments to Farrant for the presentation of Plays at the Court by his Choristers.
Organist of
1564 - 1580
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Robert Fayrfax
c.1465 - 24th Oct 1521
Robert Fayrfax was born (probably at Bayford (Herts), circa 1465.
Gentleman of the Chapel Royal in 1496. On March 28. 1502, he received, at St. Alban's, the sum of 2s. from Queen Elizabeth of York "for setting an Anthem of Oure Lady and Saint Elizabeth."
On September 10, 1514, he was appointed "one of the Poor Knights of Windsor," with 12d. a day.
In the list of the King's Chapel at the Field of Cloth of Gold, in June, 1520. the name of Fayrfax stands at the head of the Singing-men.
Died October 24, 1521.
Buried in the Presbytery of St. Alban's Abbey.
Composer of both sacred and secular music.* Some of his compositions are to be found in the music libraries at Oxford, Cambridge, the British Museum, and elsewhere.
He is worthy of mention as one of the Organists of St. Alban's before its suppression as an Abbey.
In his day he was "in great renowne and accounted the prime musitian of the nation" (Anthony a Wood).
It is said that the organ then in use, presented to the Church in 1462 by John of Wheathampsted, was the finest in England.
Organist of
1498 - 1502
Robert Fayrfax Robert Fayrfax
Robert Fayrfax
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1501-02 Mus. Doc. Robert Fayrfax, Fairfax or Ferfax, of an ancient Yorkshire family.
He was born probably about 1470.
He was Organist of St. Alban's Abbey, which at that time contained the finest organ in England, built in 1438. In 1511 he incorporated at Oxford, and the composition which he performed on that occasion, consisting of a Gloria in five parts, is preserved in a fine choir book at Lambeth Palace.
About 1509 he was appointed one of the Gentlemen of the King's Chapel.
In 1514 he was allowed 12d. a day as one of the poor Knights of Windsor. He added considerably to his income by making copies of choir books, of which the celebrated MS. mentioned by Burney and Hawkins is probably one.
He died in 1529-30, and was buried at St. Alban's.
Portions of his compositions are in the University Library at Cambridge, at St. John's and Caius Colleges, in the Music School at Oxford, and the Fayrfax MS. in the British Museum (Add. MSS., 5,465 and 31,922).
Hawkins, p. 356, gives a three-part Motet, "Ave summe zternitatis," by him, and Burney, "That was my woo," two movements from his Mass "Albanus," and a Gloria from another Mass, all for three voices. A madrigal, "I love, loved, and loved would be," by him, was published in 1891 by the Plainsong and Mediaeval Music Society.

Extract: A short historical account of the degrees in music at Oxford and Cambridge.
(Williams, C. F. Abdy)
John Fermer (Farmer)
c. 1570 – c. 1601
John Fermer's name is given as both Fermer and Farmer in the Christ Church Cathedral Chapter Books.
On July 18, 1597. "It is ordered that if Mr. John Fermer doe not return by the first of August, 1597, that then all Excuses sett a-part :—his place to bee voyd in this Church for depting (sic) the land without lycence." It is probable, therefore, that this is no less a person than John Farmer, the Madrigal writer, as the latter was living in Broad Street, London, in 1599. In this year he published "The first set of English Madrigals to Foure Voyces." He also contributed to Thomas Este's "Whole Booke of Psalmes," 1592.
Organist of
1595 - 1598/9
1595 - 1598/9
John Fermer
John Fermer
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John Ferrabosco
John Ferrabosco was probably grandson of
Alphonso Ferrabosco, Alphonso Ferrabosco
Alphonso Ferrabosco (Elder)
1543 – 12th Aug 1588
Italian composer
Famous as the solitary Italian madrigalist working in England.
May have been a spy for Elizabeth I
an Italian musician resident in England during Elizabeth's reign.
His degree was granted by royal letters patent of Charles II.
Died 1682.
The Ely Cathedral books contain fourteen Services and eleven Anthems by him.
"His salary as Organist, and that of his successor Hawkins, was £30 a year. This was augmented by a sum of £6, paid to them as holding the office of cook (!), which was doubtless a sinecure." ("Organs and Organists of Ely Cathedral." -Dr. A. W. Wilson.)
Organist of
1662 - 1682
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Degrees logo 1671. Mus. Doe. John Ferrabosco, by royal letters of James II.
He was Organist of Ely, where some of his anthems are preserved.
He died in 1682.
He is supposed to have been the grandson of Alphonso Ferrabosco the elder, an Italian composer who settled in England during Elizabeth's reign.
Extract: A short historical account of the degrees in music at Oxford and Cambridge.
(Williams, C. F. Abdy)
John Fido (Fidow)
Dismissed by the Vicars of Hereford Cathedral, February 22, 1594.
"Item ye said day and place ye Custos and Vicars aforesaid and ye greater number of ym concluded and agreed not to allow Jo Fidow not (sic) to be ye Organist, neither to pay him any wage, therefore neither to admitt him nor to allow him to come to there house and Comons. This Act was made agt him for yt he gave out most slanderous words agt ye Custos and company."
Reappointed at Hereford for a short time (notwithstanding his previous dismissal) in 1597.
Eventually returned to Worcester, and was appointed Minor Canon and Assistant-Organist to Thomas Tomkins.
After various admonitions he was suspended there in 1633, but he reappears in the Records there in 1639.
Died, about 1540.
His Anthem, "Hear me, O Lord," is to be found in the Peterhouse (Cambridge), and Barnard Collections.
Organist of
1593 - 1594
1595 - 1596
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Logo, Newspaper article Chapter Act Book, Hereford Cathedral. December 1593
"Item tunc et ibidem admiserunt Johannem Fydo, laicum, in musicis perituin, ad officium pulsator organi. Qui in organistam in dicta ecclesia Cathedralis cum omnibus feodis, juribus, et proficuis eidem officio spectantibus fuit admissus, prestitio prius per eundem juramento de renuntiando" (&c.).
Thomas Finell
- 1709
Deputy-Organist at Christ Church, Dublin, prior to being made organist.
He was "Keeper of the organs" 1682 - 1694 at Christ Church Dublin.
It is said that he was admitted on probation as Organist of Christ Church Cathedral on October 10, 1694.
Died 1709.
Some compositions by him are included in the Music Books of Chester Cathedral.
Organist of
1689 - 1691 / 1692 - 1694
1694 - 1698
1689 - 1691 Deputy-Organist
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Richard Fisher
Richard Fisher was the first Master of the Choristers at Worcester Cathedral, "per cartam Regie Majestatis," under the New Foundation.
Churchwarden of St. Michael's in 1543.
"Keeper of the Church Stock," and one of the Overseers in 1551.
Buried January 23. 1568-9.
Organist of
1541 - 1569
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James f. Fitzgerald
1873
James f. Fitzgerald was born 1873.
Educated at Uppingham School, Trinity College, Cambridge, and the Royal College of Music.
Assistant-Organist at Christ Church, Dublin, i901 Joint-Organist, with John Horan, 1904; succeeded to the full office, 1907.
Resigned 1913, on taking Orders in the Church of Ireland.
Organist of
1907 - 1913
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Henry Edmund Ford
Henry Edmund Ford was born August 6, 1821 at Warlingham, Surrey.
Chorister in Rochester Cathedral and Assistant-Organist there, under
R Banks. Ralph Banks
1762 - 20th Sep 1841
Organist
Rochester Cathedral

Dr. Ford was Organist of Carlisle Cathedral for the long period of sixty-seven years.
Created Mus.D. by the Archbishop of Canterbury. 1891.
On the attainment of his Jubilee as Organist of Carlisle Cathedral, 1892, he was presented with a testimonial at the County Hotel, Carlisle.
He retired from active duty as Organist in 1902, and died November 3, 1909. Buried in Carlisle Cemetery.
The specification of a new organ for Carlisle Cathedral, by Willis, was drawn up by Dr. Ford and his friend, W. T. Best, who was a native of Carlisle.
Organist of
Gillingham Parish Church.
1842 - 1909
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William Fox
- 1579
An old Chapter account of 1572, quoted by Willis ("Survey"), records that William Fox yearly stipend was £13 0s. 8d.
Composer of an Anthem, "Teach me Thy way," an early copy of which is in the Ely Cathedral Library. It was published in The Parish Choir (1847), and is now included in Novello's 8vo Anthems.
Organist of
1572 - 1579
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John Frith
c.1644
"He was required to compose a piece in seven parts for his degree."("Degrees in Music." by C. F. Abdy Williams.)
A Service in G by him is included in an old MS. Organ book formerly in the possession of the late J. S. Bumpus, who was of opinion that the book once belonged to St. John's College.
Organist of
? - ?
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Degrees logo 1020. Mus. Bac.—John Frith, Organist of St. John's Coil.
He was required to compose a piece in seven parts for his degree.
Wood had seen some of his compositions, but they do not appear to have been published.
He died in 1644
Extract: A short historical account of the degrees in music at Oxford and Cambridge.
(Williams, C. F. Abdy)
Frederick Robert Frye
1851 - 1942
Frederick Robert Frye was born in 1851 at Brooke, Kent.
Pupil of A. Legge, Drs. E. H. Turpin, James Higgs, and F. E. Gladstone, and F. Davenport.
Conductor of Chelmsford Association of Church Choirs and various Choral Societies.
Composer of an Evening Service, Madrigal, Songs, Organ and Pianoforte pieces, Etc.
Organist of
New Romney Parish Church, 1870
1876 - 1942
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Logo, Newspaper article DEATH OF MR. F. R. FRYE
Mr. Frederick Robert Frye, Mus. Bac., F.R.C.0., whose death is reported on Page One, was up to his retirement last June at the age of 91 organist of Chelmsford Cathedral for sixty-six years. At the time of his death, he was organist eneritus of the Cathedral.
Last year Mr. Frye made a remarkable recovery from a serious illness, and resumed his duties as organist, but felt the work should be passed on to younger hands, and a few months ago the Cathedral Church Council regretfully accepted his resignation.
Mr. Frye was probably the oldest cathedral organist in Great Britain.
He was born at Brodse in Kent, but his father was a native of Thaxted.
Before coming to Chelmsford in 1876 he was organist and choirmaster at New Romney from 1870.
He obtained the F.R.C.O. Degree in 1878. and the Degree of Bachelor of Music, Cambridge University, in 1887.
For 20 years he was a member of the Royal College Organists, and acted as examiner to that body.
For 27 years Mr. Frye conducted the Chelmsford Musical Society, and for a long period was choirmaster to the Chelmsford Association of Church Choirs. These two bodies came to an end with the advent the Essex Musical Association.
Chief among Mr. Frye's church music compositions are the Magnificat and Nunc Dimittis (for the Church Choirs Festival in 1898) Christmas Carol. "Tis the Day. the Blessed Day." and descants to several hymns.
In 1926 Mr. Frye was the recipient of a handsome presentation to mark his-fifty years of service. Not one of the choir of the Cathedral Church when Mr. Frye came to Chelmsford is now alive. Mr. F. Wykebam, Chancellor has probably the longest record of choir service under him - over 60 years.
Mr. Frye had been widower for some years. There is one son. Mr. Carey Frye. who holds an appointment in Northern Ireland.

Chelmsford Chronicle
Friday 28 August 1942
(www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk)

Degrees logo 1887. Mus. Bac. - Frederick Robert Frye.
Extract: A short historical account of the degrees in music at Oxford and Cambridge.
(Williams, C. F. Abdy)
Robert Fuller
- 1743
Lay Clerk turned Organist. Served as acting organist at Kings after the suspension of Thomas Tudway.
Graduated Mus.D at the University of Cambridge 1724
From 1730 he was master of the choristors of Kings.
Also Organist to the University, 1731.
Died 1743. Buried in All Saints Church.
There are seven Anthems by him in the Ely Collection. These include 'Behold, I bring you' and 'I will always give thanks'.
Organist of
1727 - 1742
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Degrees logo 1724. Mus. Bac. - Robert Fuller, of Kings College.
Extract: A short historical account of the degrees in music at Oxford and Cambridge.
(Williams, C. F. Abdy)
Peter Fussell
1726 - 1802
Pupil of James Kent, eventually succeeding him at Winchester.
Taught Charles Dibdin (Senr.) his notes at Winchester College.
Died July, 1802. Buried in the North Transept of the Cathedral.
Composer of Church Music. His Cantate Service in A was once popular.
Organist of
1774 - 1802
1774 - 1802
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Logo, Newspaper article WINCHESTER
Tuesday died, aged 76, Mr. Peter Fussel, many years organist of the Cathedral and College

Hampshire Chronicle
Monday 02 August 1802
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George Gaffe
27th Jul 1849 - 25th Sep 1907
George Gaffe was born July 27, 1849 at Cawston, Norfolk.
Chorister in Norwich Cathedral, and pupil of and assistant to
Dr. Z. Buck.Zechariah Buck
10th Sep 1798 - 5th Aug 1879

Founder and Principal of the St. Alban's School of Music; Fellow and Member of the Council of the Royal College of Organists.
Died 1907.
Composer of an Evening Service: a set of Offertory Sentences, Etc.
Organist of
Oswestry Parish Church, 1874;
1880 - 1907
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Logo, Newspaper article THE LATE MR. GEORGE GAFFE
The death has taken place, at the age of 58, of Mr. George Gaffe, Fellow of the Royal College of Organists, who, from 1890 until January of this year, was organist at St. Alban's Cathedral.
Mr. Gaffe was born at Cawston, Norfolk, and in 1849, when but eight years of age, he entered the choir of Norwich Cathedral.
In 1882 be became articled pupil to Dr. Zechariah Buck, then organist or Norwich Cathedral, and in 1888 he was Invited by Dr. Buck to prolong his stay at Norwich Cathedral. and to become his assistant, This Mr. Gaffe consented to do, and continued in that position until 1874. When he accepted the post of organist and choirmaster of the parish church at Osweststry, Shropshire. There he was closely associated with Mr. Henry Leslie, who made him chorus master of the Oswestry Festival, which at that time had a great reputation.
He also became principal of Henry Leslie's School OF Music.
In 1880 he quitted Oswestry for St. Albans Cathedral in succession to Mr. J, S. Booth Mr. Gaffe had a great admiration For Dr. Buck. anti, despite his removal from Norwich, he kept up a connection with the place at which his musical career began.
Hr was mainly responsible for the organisation of the Old Boys' Association, consisting of articled pupils of the late Dr. Buck, and old Norwich choristers, who yearly had their re-union. A friendship of a very close nature subsisted between Mr. Gaffe and Dr. A. U, Mann, of Cambridge, and, when It was perceived that his condition was hopeless, it was Dr. Mann who was sent, fur, and was able to arrive a few minutes before his end came at 8.25 on Wednesday evening last week.

Norfolk Chronicle
Saturday 28 September 1907
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Thomas Garland
1731 - 1st Mar 1808
Thomas Garland was probably born in Norwich Cathedral Precincts.
Baptized July 5, 1731.
Pupil of Dr. Greene.
Died March 1, 1808. Buried under the Organ Screen in Norwich Cathedral.
Composer of the Ordination Hymn, "Come, Holy Ghost, our souls inspire," printed in Bunnett's "Sacred Harmony," 1865, and several Anthems. A new Anthem by him was sung at the reopening of the Organ, after repairs by John Byfield, on November 30, 1759.
Organist of
1749 - 1808
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Logo, Newspaper article DEATHS
Tuefday laft, in the Preccin&t, Thomas Garland, Efq, aged 77, having been organift at the the Cathedral fifty-nine years.
Norfolk Chronicle
Saturday 27 February 1808
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George Mursell Garrett
8th Jun 1834 - 8th Apr 1897
George Mursell Garrettwas born June 8. 1834 at Winchester.
Chorister in New College, Oxford.
Pupil of Dr. S. S. Wesley.
Organist to the University, 1873. M.A., propter merita, 1878.
University lecturer in Harmony and Counterpoint, 1883.
Conductor of St. John's College Musical Society.
Died April 8, 1897.
Buried in the Cambridge Cemetery, Mill Road.
Composer of Cantatas, Church Music, Organ pieces. Pianoforte pieces, Pan-songs, Songs, Etc.
Lecturer on Musical subjects, Editor of a Collection of Chants, Etc.
Organist of
St. Thomas's, Winchester, 1848;
Holy Trinity, Winchester, 1852;
Madras Cathedral, 1854;
1857 - 1897
George Mursell Garrett George Mursell Garrett
George Mursell Garrett
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Degrees logo 1857 Mus. Bac. - George Mursell Garrett, St. John's College.
Mus. Doc., 1867; M.A. by grace of the Senate, 1878, being the first musician upon whom this degree has been conferred without residence, with the exception of the Professors of Music.
Extract: A short historical account of the degrees in music at Oxford and Cambridge.
(Williams, C. F. Abdy)
Frederick Samuel Garton
c.1859 - 1914
Frederick Samuel Garton was a pupil of Dr. Done, and Assistant-Organist of Worcester Cathedral.
Organist of
Dudley Parish Church;
1883 - 1894
St. Martin's, Haverfordwest. 1894.
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Logo, Newspaper article ORGANIST'S DIVORCE
Frederick Samuel Garton, organist of St. David's, formerly of Chester, to-day obtained divorce decree. His wife had admitted committing adultery with a farmer's son named Griffiths.

Lincolnshire Echo
Friday 11 May 1894
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John George
Organist, at a salary of £5 a quarter, during the pleasure of the Dean and Chapter, and no longer.
There is an entry in the Chapter books, "John George — pro modulandis organis - £2o."
On July 1, 1709, "John George, the Organist and one of the Vicars, was warned not to leave the Church before prayers were ended."
Organist of
1690 - 1712
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Alexander Gerard
- 1738
Died March, 1738.
An Alexander Gerrard was a Chorister in the Chapel Royal until about 1694.
There is some Church Music by him in the MS. Books of the Cathedral.
Organist of
1694 - 1738
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John Gerard
John Gerard was the son of Alexander Gerard.
Singing-boy, retired, 1737. Supernumerary Singing-man, 1737. Died 1788.
There is a song by J. Gerrard in "Clio and Euterpe" (1758.1762).
(See also Richard Jarred or Gerard, Organist of Bangor Cathedral, 1778-1782.)
Organist of
1738 - 1779?
Wrexham Parish Church, 1779.
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Thomas Gibbes
Thomas Gibbes is possibly a son of Richard Gibbs, Organist of Norwich Cathedral.
According to the registers he was still Organist at Canterbury Cathedral in 1664.
There is no record of his resignation or death. He probably held the office at Canterbury Cathedral until the appointment of Chomley, in 1669.
Organist of
1661 - 1669?
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Christopher Gibbons
1615 - 20th Oct 1676
Christopher Gibbons was the son of Orlando Gibbons. Born 1615.
Chorister in the Chapel Royal.
Pupil of his uncle, Edward Gibbons, at Exeter.
Organist of Winchester Cathedral from 1638 until the Rebellion, when he joined the Royalist Army.
His appointment at Winchester appears to have been retained (nominally at all events) until June 23. 1661.
At the Restoration he became Organist of Westminster Abbey and the Chapel Royal, and was appointed one of the Musicians of the Virginals to Charles II., in the place of Thomas Warwick.
Died October 20. 1676. Buried in Westminster Abbey Cloisters.
Composer of Church Music, an Act Song (performed for his Degree). Music to a Masque, Etc.
According to Wood, he was "a grand debauchee. He would often sleep at Morning Prayer when he was to play the organ."
It is said that he carried the £1,000 lent to the King by his uncle Edward.
The Royal Letter to the University of Oxford, directing them to confer the degree of Doctor of Music on Christopher Gibbons, is as follows:—
"Whereas the bearer. Christopher Gibbons, one of the Organists of our Royal Chapel, bath from his youth served our royal Father and ourselves, and bath so well improved himself in musick as well in our judgement as the judgement of all men well skilled in the science, as that he may worthily receive the honor and degree of Doctor therein. We in consideration of his merit and fitness thereunto, have thought fit by these our Letters to recommend him unto you, and to signify our gracious pleasure to you that he be forthwith admitted and created Doctor in Music." On the occasion of his being created Doctor of Music the Dean and Chapter of Westminster made him a present of £5
Organist of
1638 - 1661
1660 - 1666
1660 - 1676
Christopher Gibbons Christopher Gibbons
Christopher Gibbons
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Degrees logo 1663
Mus. Doc, Christopher Gibbons, of Christ Church, by Royal letters.
He was born 1615, was a son of Orlando Gibbons, and was educated under his uncle, Ellis Gibbons, Organist of Exeter.
In 1638 he became Organist of Winchester Cathedral. He was one of the few Church musicians left at the Restoration, and was at once made Organist of Westminster Abbey and the Chapel of Charles II.
Wood says he was "a grand debauchee. He would often sleep at Morning Prayer when he was to play the organ."
The King requested the University of Oxford to confer the degree of Doctor upon him, which was accordingly done in 1664, and his exercise was performed in St. Mary's Church "with very great honour to himself and his faculty."
Gibbons died in 1676.
He excelled more as an organist than as a composer. His compositions are his "Act Song," performed for his degree, preserved in the Music School at Oxford; music to Shirley's Masque "Cupid and Death," composed in conjunction with Loch in 1653; some compositions in Playford's Cantica sacra, 1674; and some MSS. in the British and Fitzwilliam Museums.

Extract: A short historical account of the degrees in music at Oxford and Cambridge.
(Williams, C. F. Abdy)
Orlando Gibbons
Orlando Gibbons was the son of William Gibbons, one of the
"Wayts" CAMBRIDGE WAITS & ORLANDO GIBBONS
FOR some time there has been an increasing demand for good music, greatly augmented during the war when it emerged in no uncertain fashion. To meet this need in East Anglia, with its scattered population, and in some of the East Midland towns, a Regional Council, fostered and promoted by the Arts Council, is in process of formation, having as its object the establishment of a permanent Symphony Orchestra. Such an orchestra would have Cambridge as its centre; it would serve the towns in the region from September to May, while during the summer it would be concentrated mainly on the coast.
With this growing interest in music for the community and the special attention given to Elizabethan music, it may be worth while to look back to the period, lasting for at least three hundred years) when 'Town Music' supported by the municipality had a prominent place in Cambridge civic life. It was a very different type of music, for symphony and string quartet were then un-known, but it developed into something exquisite of its kind, and in the later Elizabethan period Cambridge could claim an important share as the home and training ground of Orlando Gibbons, the brilliant son of one of the Cambridge Waits or musicians, who formed the Town Music.
of Cambridge.
Born at Cambridge, 1583. Chorister in King's College, Cambridge, under his brother, Edward Gibbons.
Died at Canterbury, June 5, 1625, whilst undertaking the commission of Charles I. to direct the music for the reception of Henrietta Maria.
Buried in the Nave of Canterbury Cathedral.
Celebrated composer of Church Music, Madrigals, pieces for Virginals. Fantasias for Vials, Etc.
Organist of
1604 - 1625
1623 - 1635
Orlando Gibbons Orlando Gibbons
Orlando Gibbons
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Logo, Newspaper article Orlando Gibbons
Inscription to Orlando Gibbons on the wall of the North Aisle at Canterbury:-
Orlando Gibbons, Cantabtidgia inter Musas et Mucicam nato, sacrze R. Capella Organista. Sphararum Harmouue digitorum; pulsu amulo Cafl'iOnum compturium quque eum non canunt minus quam Canuntor Canditori; viro integerrimo et cujus vita cum ant suavissimus moribus concordissime certavit ad nupt: C. R. cum M. P. Doroberii accito ictuque heu sanguinis crudo et crudely tarn extincto, choroque calesti transcript die Pentecostes A. D. N. MDCXX V. Elizabetha conjux semptemque ex eo liberorum parens, tant I six doloris superstes merentissimo marentissima posuit.
Dart's translation :-
To Orlando Gibbons of Cambridge, born among the muses and music; Organist of the Royal Chapel; emulating by the touch of his fingers the harmony of the spheres; composer of many hymns which sound his praise no less than that of his Maker; a man of integrity whose manner of life and sweetness of temper vied with that of his art: being sent for to Dover to attend the nuptials of King Charles and Mary; he died of the small pox,' and was conveyed to the Heavenly choir on Whitsun Day, anno 1625. Elizabeth his wife, who bore him seven children, little able to survive such a loss, to her most deserving Husband hath, with tears, erected this monument.

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Richard Gibbs
Richard Gibbs was a composer of Anthems, Etc. (See Clifford's Collection.)
There is an Anthem, "Have mercy upon me. 0 God," by Richard Gibbs, in a Collection of "Easy Anthems for Parish Church Choirs," edited by Sir W. H. Cope.
Organist of
1622 - 1630
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Thomas Gibbs
According to the Chapter accounts at Norwich Cathedral a Thomas Gibbs (probably son of Richard Gibbs) was Organist at the same time as Richard Ayleward.
He died of the plague, and was buried on July 16, 1666.
Note; a Thomas Gibbes is recorded as organist at Canterbury Cathedral in 1661 - 1669
Organist of
(1664 - 1665)?
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Joseph Gibson
Organist of
1687 - 1701
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Nathaniel Giles (Gyles)
1558 - 24th Jan 1633
Nathaniel Giles was born about 1558 of a Worcestershire family.
Possibly a Clerk of Magdalen College, Oxford, in 1577.
Master of the Choristers of St. George's Chapel, Windsor.
Master of the Children of the Chapel Royal, 1597.
Died January 24, 1633. Buried in St. George's Chapel, Windsor.
Composer of Church Music, Madrigals, Etc.
Contributor to Leighton's "Tears and Lamentacions of a Sorrowful Soule."
Organist of
1581 - 1585
1585 - 1633
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Degrees logo 1585

Mus. Bac. Nathaniel Giles, born about 1550. Chorister, then Clerk of Magd. Coll,, afterwards Organist and Master of the Choristers of St. George's, Windsor.
In 1597 he succeeded Hunnis as Master of the Children of the Chapel Royal.
His supplication for the Doctorate in 1607 was granted on condition of his composing and performing a choral hymn in eight parts at the Act; but he failed to do this for some reason, and did not proceed to the higher degree till 1622. On this occasion the following questions were appointed to be discussed between him and Dr. Heather: "Whether discords were to be allowed in music? 2. Whether any artificial instrument can so fully and truly express music as the natural voice? 3. Whether the practice be the more useful part of music or the theory?"
These questions, however, were not actually discussed, being merely a matter of form. Wood remarks that he was as "noted for his religious life (a rarity in musicians) as for the excellence of his faculty."
His compositions consist of some contributions to Leighton's "Teares and Lamentacions of a sorrowfull Soule," 1641, and some MS. Anthems. Hawkins, page 961, quotes his "Lesson of discant on the plainsong of Miserere."
Other compositions are in Barnard's Collection, the Fitzwilliam and British Museums, and in other MS. collections.
He died January 24, 1633-4.

Extract: A short historical account of the degrees in music at Oxford and Cambridge.
(Williams, C. F. Abdy)
Thomas Giles (Gyles)
Father of Dr. Nathaniel Giles (Organist of St. Georges Chapel, Windsor).
On April 26, 1585, he received a commission from Queen Elizabeth to impress choristers.
Organist of
1582 - 1590
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Frances Edward Gladstone
2nd Mar 1845 - 6th Sep 1928
Frances Edward Gladstone was born March 2, 1845 at Summertown, near Oxford.
He was a pupil of Dr. S. S. Wesley at Winchester Cathedral.
Joined the Roman Catholic Church, and was Director of the Music at St. Mary of the Angels, Bayswater, until 1894.
For sometime Professor of Harmony and Counterpoint at the Royal College of Music. Examiner, Etc.
Resident in Hereford.
Composer of Cantatas, Church Music, Organ pieces, Part-songs, Songs, Etc.
Organist of
Holy Trinity Church, Weston-super-Mare 1864 - 1866
1866 - 1870
1870 - 1873
St Patrick's Church, Hove 1873 - 1875
St Peter's Church, Brighton 1875 - 1876
St. Mark's Church, Lewisham 1876 - 1877
1877 - 1881
Christ Church, Lancaster Gate, Ldn. 1881 -
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Walter Gleeson
Promoted from Lay Clerk to Clerk, 1547. Master of the Choristers (Organist), 1552.
Chapter Clerk from 1556 for many years.
Organist of
1552 - 1562
Thomas Godfrey
Fled to England 1689
Organist of
1688 - 1689
1686 - 1689
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Matthew Godwin
c.Sep 1568- 12th Jan 1586
Buried under the North Tower of Exeter Cathedral.
Organist of

1584 - 1586
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Logo, Newspaper articleMemorial Inscription
Matthei Godwin adolescentis pii mitis ingeniosii
musicæ bacchalaurii dignissimi scientissimi
Ecciesiarum Cathed.: Cantuar: et Exon.; Archimusici.
Æternæ memoriæ posuit G : M : Fr : vixit annos XVII:
menses V: Hinc ad cœlos migravit XII Januarii, 1586.
(Translation by F. S. Rumpus.)
"G. M. Fr. placed this to the eternal memory of Matthew Godwin, a pious, gentle, and clever youth, Bachelor in Music and most skilful chief-musician of the Cathedrals of Canterbury and Exeter. He lived seventeen years and five months, and departed hence to heaven, 12 January, 1586."

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John Goldwin (Golding)
1670 - 7th Nov 1719
John Goldwin was born 1670.
Pupil of
Dr. Child.
William Child
c1606 - 23rd Mar 1697
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Master of the Choristers St. George's Chapel, 1703.
Died at Windsor, November 7, 1719.
Composer of a Service in F, a few Anthems, and some "Lessons&qyuot; for the Harpsichord (MS.).
Organist of
1697 - 1719
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Richard Goodson (Senr.)
1655 - 13th Jan 1718
Richard Goodson was born 1655.
Chorister in St. Paul's Cathedral.
Appointed University Professor of Music, 1682.
Died January 13, 1718. Buried in South Aisle of Christ Church.
A few of his MS. Compositions are included in the Library of Christ Church and the Music School.
Organist of
1682 -
1691 - 1718
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Degrees logo 1682 (circa). Mus. Bac.
About this date Richard Goodson, the elder, Organist of New Coil, and Ch. Ch., took his degree, and was in this year appointed Professor of Music. He died in 1718.
Extract: A short historical account of the degrees in music at Oxford and Cambridge.
(Williams, C. F. Abdy)
Richard Goodson (Jnr)
Richard Goodson is the son of Richard Goodson (Senr.).
Previously Organist at Newbury. Succeeded his father as Organist of the Cathedral and University Professor of Music, 118.
Died 1741. Buried in Christ Church.
MS. Compositions at Christ Church and the Music School.
Organist of
1718 - 1741
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Extract: A short historical account of the degrees in music at Oxford and Cambridge.
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Sir John Goss
27th Dec 1800 - 10th May 1880
John Goss was born at Fareham, December 27, 1800.
Chorister in the Chapel Royal.
Pupil of Attwood.
Was an unsuccessful candidate for the Organistship of Old Chelsea Church, 1819.
Appointed composer to the Chapel Royal, 1856.
Knighted soon after the Thanksgiving for the recovery of H.R.H. the Prince of Wales, 1872, and retired from St. Paul's the same year.
Died at Clarewood Terrace, Brixton Rise, May 10, 1880. Buried in Kensal Green Cemetery, May 15.
Composer of Church Music, Glees, Madrigals, Overtures for Orchestra, Songs, Etc.
Compiler of Organ Arrangements, Chant and Hymn Books. Author of a Treatise on Harmony and a Catechism of the Rudiments of Music.

Inscription on the Monument to Sir John Goss in the Crypt of St. Paul's Cathedral :-
"In remembrance of Sir John Goss, Knt. Mus.D., Cantab.; Composer to H.M. Chapels Royal, and for 34 years Organist and Vicar Choral of this Cathedral. Born 27th December, 1800 Died 10th May, 1880. 'His genius and skill are shewn in the various compositions with which he has enriched the music of the Church. His virtues and kindness of heart endeared him to his pupils and friends, who have erected this monument in token of their admiration and esteem."
Camera icon John Goss monumentSir John Goss monument


Organist of
Stockwell Chapel, 1821 ;
St. Luke's, Chelsea, 1824; 1838 - 1872

You Tube link icon"O Saviour of the world"
St Paul’s Cathedral 1991
You Tube link iconSee amid the winters snow
TENET Vocal Artists
Sir John Goss Sir John Goss
Sir John Goss
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Walter Henry Goss-Custard
7th Feb 1871 - 6th Jul 1964
Walter Henry Goss-Custard was born 7th February 1871 at St. Leonards-on-Sea.
A Pupil of E.H. Lemare and others.
Hon. Organist to the Royal Philharmonic Society, London. 1907 - 1917
Organist and Choirmaster to St' Mary's Church of the Blind 1917.
Composer of a setting of Psalm 68, Church music, Etc.
Organist of
Christ Church, Brooklands, Hastings. 1887.
Holy Trinity, Hastings, 1887.
St. John's Lewisham, 1902.
St. Saviour's Ealing 1904.
1917 - 1955
Walter Henry Goss-Custard Walter Henry Goss-Custard
Walter Henry Goss-Custard
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Logo, Web site link Goss-Custard was a grand-nephew of John Goss (a former organist of St Paul's Cathedral) and elder brother of Reginald Goss-Custard. He took the Oxford BMus in 1895.
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Reginald Goss-Custard
29th Mar 1877 - 13th Jun 1956
Reginald Goss-Custard was born 29th March 1877 at St Leonards-on-Sea.
Organist of
St. Margeret's, Westminster, 1902 - 1913

You Tube link iconAn Old Church Legend
Alexandra Palace Organ
You Tube link iconSong of the Morning
Reginald Goss-Custard Reginald Goss-Custard
Reginald Goss-Custard
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Logo, Newspaper article Noted Organist Dies
Mr. Reginald Goss-Custard, organist and choirmaster at St. Margaret's Westminster, London, from 1902 to 1913 has died at Dorking (Surrey). It is announced today. He was 79. He played at Winston Churchill's wedding in 1908
He was a brother of Dr. Walter Henry Goss Custard who recently retired from post of organist at Liverpool Cathedral.

Liverpool Echo
Friday 15 June 1956
(www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk)

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Alan Gray
23rd Dec 1855 - 27th Sep 1935
Alan Gray was born December 23, 1855 at York.
Studied for the legal profession and was admitted as a solicitor in 1881.
Pupil (for music) of Dr. E. G. Monk.
Music Master of Wellington College, 1883.
Conductor of Cambridge University Musical Society.
President of the Royal College of Organists
Sheffield Daily Telegraph
Friday 29 September 1922

Composer of Cantatas, Odes, Church Music, Orchestral Music, Chamber Music, Sonatas for Organ, Songs, Etc.
Lecturer on Music, Etc.
Organist of
Wellington College, 1883.
1892
You Tube link iconElegy (1915) - James Garratt
You Tube link iconIf I should die (Alan Gray)
Guildford Cathedral Choir (Barry Rose)
Alan Gray organist Alan Gray organist
Alan Gray

Image;- Hyperion Records
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Degrees logo 1886 Mus Bac. Alan Gray, Trinity Coil.
LL.B., 1877;
LL.M., 1883;
Mus. Doc., 1889.
Extract: A short historical account of the degrees in music at Oxford and Cambridge.
(Williams, C. F. Abdy)

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Logo, Newspaper article OBITUARY DR. ALAN GRAY
Famous Organist and Composer of Church Music
Dr. Alan Gray, Honorary Fellow and former organist of Trinity College, Cambridge, has died at his Cambridge residence at the age of 79.
Son of Mr. William Gray, Gray's Court, York, he was educated at St. Peter's, York, and Trinity. He was admitted a solicitor in 1831, but he soon forsook the Law for music, and studying under Dr. E. G. Monk, York Minster, be became a doctor of music. He was musical director at Wellington College in 1883, and succeeded Sir Charles Stanford as organist at Trinity 10 years later, a post he held until five years ago.
Dr. Gray was famous as an organist, and has been ranked among the five leading executants of the world. He composed largely for the organ as well as great deal church music. His Book of Descants is known all over the world, and he introduced this form of harmony into the services at Trinity. Dr, Gray was made Hon. Fellow Trinity upon hiss retirement, and his pupil, Dr. Vaughan Williams, was similarly honoured recently, probably a unique record the history of music.

Belfast News-Letter
Monday 30 September 1935
(www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk)
Thomas Greatorex
1758 - 18th Jul 1831
Thomas Greatorex was born at North Wingfield, Derbyshire, 1758. Son of Anthony Greatorex, Riber Hall, Matlock.
Pupil of Dr. B. Cooke.
Lived for some time with his patron, the Earl of Sandwich, at Hinchinbrook House, near Huntingdon.
Organist of Carlisle Cathedral, 1781. Resigned, 1784, and lived at Newcastle. Afterwards travelled in Italy. On his return to England was appointed Conductor of the Concerts of Ancient Music, in succession to Joah Bates.
For some years Conductor of the Birmingham and York Festivals.
He was also an eminent Mathematician and Astronomer. Fellow of the Royal and Linnæn Societies.
Died 1831. Buried in the West Cloister. Westminster Abbey.
At the time of his death (July, 1831), Westminster Abbey was being prepared for the Coronation of William IV. but, out of respect for Greatorex's memory, the Dean caused the coverings placed over the organ to be temporarily removed.
George IV., when Prince Regent, once said to Greatorex: "My Father is Rex, but you are a Greater Rex."

Organist of
1781 - 1784
1819 - 1831
Thomas Greatorex
Thomas Greatorex
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Maurice Greene
1696 - 1st Dec 1755
Maurice Greene was born in London, 1696.
Son of the Rev. Thomas Greene, Rector of St. Olave's Jewry.
Chorister in St. Paul's, and pupil of Richard Brind.
Professor of Music in the University of Cambridge, 1730.
Composer to the Chapel Royal, 1727.
Master of the King's Band, 1735.
Associated with
Michael Festing Michael Festing
29 November 1705 – 24 July 1752
English violinist and composer. His reputation lies mostly on his work as a violin virtuoso.
in the foundation of the Royal Society of Musicians.
For some time a friend of
George Frideric Handel,
George Frideric Handel
23 February 1685 – 14 April 1759
German, later British, Baroque composer who spent the bulk of his career in London, becoming well-known for his operas, oratorios, anthems, and organ concertos.
the latter frequently playing on the organ in St. Paul's, which instrument, it is said, greatly pleased him.
Greene is supposed to have acted as blower on some of these occasions.
Died December 1, 1755. Buried in St. Olave's, Old Jewry, London, of which his father was formerly Rector.
On the demolition of St. Olave's, Greene's remains were removed to St. Paul's and placed in the grave of Boyce, May 18, 1888.
Composer of Oratorios, Cantatas, an Opera, Odes, Songs, Catches, Organ and Harpsichord Music, a Service in C, and " Forty Select Anthems," 2 vols, (1743).
Commenced a collection of Church Music by various composers, which he gave to Dr. Boyce for completion just before his death.
Greene seems to have been a man of attractive and courteous manners, and a great favourite in society, notwithstanding the fact that he was physically deformed. Upon the death of an uncle-Sergeant Greene-he became possessed of a large estate in Essex, called
Bois Hall,
Bois Hall
Grade II listed


On Tuefday died at his Seat called Boys, near Ongar, in Effex, John Greene, Efq; Barrifter at Law. He died a Batchelor, and his Eftate defcends to Mr. Maurice Greene, Mafter of his Majefty's Band of Muficians, as Heir at Law.
Derby Mercury - Friday 17 January 1752
where it is said that he spent the greater part of his later years.
Organist of
St. Dunstan in the West, 1716;
St. Andrew's, Holborn, 1717.
1718 - 1755, and afterwards Vicar Choral of the same. 1727
organist Maurice Greene
Maurice Greene
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William Greggs
- 15th Dec 1710
William Greggs was the son of J. Greggs (Gentleman), of York.
Succeeded Alexander Shaw as Durham Cathedral Organist, 1681.
"It was agreed by the Chapter on 1st December, 1686, that Mr. Greggs the Organist have leave for three months to goe to London to improve himselfe in the skill of musicke."
Appointed Master of the Song School, 1690.
Died October 15, 1710. Buried in the Church of St. Mary the less, Durham, where an Epitaph on him is to be found on the South Wall.
His Anthem, "My heart is inditing," is in the Cathedral books.
Organist of
1681 - 1710
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James Edward Grigson
1873 - 1940
James Edward Grigson was Music Master and Organist of St. Cyprian's School. Eastbourne' c.1909
Organist of
1907 -1909
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Thomas Grizzelle
Organist of
1860 - 1868
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Logo, Newspaper article Order of Discharge
In the County Court of Oxfordshire. holden at Oxford.
IN the Matter of THOMAS MAGNESS GRIZZELLE, formerly lodgings at Chichester in the County of Surrey, then in lodgings at 106, High Street, in the City of Oxford, and now in lodgings 4 Walton Crescent, in the said City, Organist and Professor of Music, who was adjudicated bankrupt on the 27th day of February, 1869.
Whereas public sitting of the Court held this day, the Court granted an Order of Discharge to the said Bankrupt, Notice hereby given, that Order of Discharge will be drawn up and delivered to the said Bankrupt after the expiration of thirty days from this date, unless, in the meantime, appeal duly entered against the judgment of the said Court. Dated this 29th day of April, 1869.

Oxford Chronicle and Reading Gazette
Saturday 08 May 1869
(www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk)
Barnabas Gunn
- 1743 (53)
His extempore playing is said to have been remarkable.
A Te Deum and Jubilate by him are extant in MS.
He published 'Two Cantatas and Six Songs' to which Handel was one of the subscribers, and some Sonatas for the harpsichord.
Organist of
St. Philip's, Birmingham.
1730 - 1740
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Logo, Newspaper article BARNABAS GUNN'S MANY OCCUPATION
Experts give circa 1712 for the erection of Birmingham Cathedral organ, but the date when the first organist was appointed is unknown, and his name is not even mentioned in St. Philip’s records. One has to go far afield to learn who he was.
In the story of Gloucester Cathedral it is stated that, in 1730, Hine the organist died, and Barnabas Gunn from St. Philip’s, Birmingham, was selected after a severe competition, which included extempore playing on the organ. One of Gunn’s competitors was William Hayes, a native of Gloucester, the future organist of Magdalen College, Oxford, and Professor of Music to the University. Hayes never forgave Gunn for defeating him, and twenty years later attacked him in a very scarce pamphlet in which he said Gunn composed music by the Spruzzarino method—that is, dropping spots of ink from a pepper-castor and adding tails to the notes anywhere they fell.
Little is known of Gunn’s early years or of his work in Birmingham up to 1730, but in Gloucester he soon made a name by publishing a volume of songs. For this he obtained more than 600 subscribers, including leading operatic and literary celebrities of the 1735 period. Among these one finds the name of Mr. Handel, who was very chary of allowing his name to appear in a list subscribers; so Gunn must have had some reputation.
his duties as organist at Gloucester left him some vacant time. Gunn taught music at a 'ladies’ college’ and became partner in a timber business.
What caused him to resign his appointment in 1740 and return to Birmingham as organist of St. Philip’s and St. Martin's is unknown.
There is another mystery. 1730, according to the records of Chelsea College Hospital, an organist was appointed one Barnahy Gunn. Was this musician Barnabas Gunn? "Groves Dictionary of Music" says no! The "National Dictionary Biography" says yes! The records of Chelsea Hospital do not help us to come to a decision. The secretary informed me, in answer to an enquiry, that the hospital desires more information, for all it knows is that Barnahy Gunn was appointed in 1730 and died in 1753. As Barnabas Gunn died in Birmingham 1753, it seems certain they were the same. Gunn, after returning to Birmingham, gave annual concerts—the first of their kind for which he engaged London singers. For his first concert he booked a singer from the Chapel Royal, who also sang solo at St. Martin’s and St. Philip’s at the Sunday service. The singers name was Anselm Bailey, who had written a volume entitled "The Alliance of Poetry and Oratory." This was in 1743; possibly the first time a Vicar Choral from London sang at a service in the provinces.

Birmingham Daily Post
Thursday 13 April 1939
(www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk)
Frederick Gunton
1813 - 1888
Frederick Gunton was born at Norwich, 1813.
Pupil of Alfred Pettet (Organist of St. Peter Man-croft, Norwich).
Director of the King's School Concerts, Etc.
Resigned the Cathedral appointment, 1877, at which time he was presented with a testimonial in the form of a handsome piece of plate.
Died at Chester, 1888. Buried in Upton Churchyard.
Dr. Anson, upon being appointed Dean of Chester, brought Gunton, his Organist, with him from Southwell. Gunton effected great improvements in the musical services at Chester Cathedral, and the present organ, by Whiteley, was erected under his superintendence.
It is said that Mendelssohn, having on one occasion heard Gunton play upon the Cathedral organ, remarked to someone present that his (Gunton's) touch was "like velvet."

Organist of
1835 - 1841
1841 - 1877
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John Gye
Vicar Choral. In the Chapter Acts of Wells Cathedral he appears as Organist and Master of the Choristers in 1511. In 1512 he was rewarded for "his praiseworthy organ-playing and diligent instruction of the boys and choristers." (Dr. Grattan Flood, Musical Times, March, 1921.)
Organist of
1509 - 1546
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