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Directory of Past Classical Organists


Extract from Cathedral Organists Past and Present
By John E. West
Published in 1921
Additional information from the British Newspaper Archive.

This page is still a work in progress

A - B - C - D - E - F - G - H - J - K - L - M - N - O - P - Q - R - S - T - U - V - W *
Henry Hall (Snr)
c.1655 - 1707
Henry Hall was the son of Captain Henry Hall, of Windsor.
Born about 1655.
Chorister in the Chapel Royal.
Pupil of
Dr. Blow.
John Blow
1649 - 1st Oct 1708
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Vicar Choral of Hereford Cathedral, 1688.
Took Holy Orders, 1698.
Died 1707. Buried in the Cloister of Vicars' College,Hereford.
Some of his Church Music is to be found in the Tudway Collection. He also acquired some celebrity as a poet.
His son Henry Hall, Junr. succeeded him as Organist of Hereford Cathedral.
Organist of
1674 - 1686
1688 - 1707

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Henry Hall (Jnr)
- 22nd Jan 1713
Son of the Henry Hall (Snr).
Succeeded his father in the appointment at Hereford Cathedral.
Died January 22, 1713.
None of his compositions are extant, but it appears th it as a poet he was even more gifted than his father.
Organist of
1707 - 1713

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John Hampton
Probably a son of John Hampton, a Mercer and one of the Bailiffs of Worcester in 1477.
In the Deed of Appointment it is stated that for services past and future he is to receive an annual payment of fourteen white loaves ("Monken lovus"), fourteen gists of ale, and the sum of £3 135. 4d. in equal portions each quarter.
In 1495 be was rewarded with (£1 "for making of Balades," in connection with the King's visit to Worcester.
A five-part setting of Salve Regina by him is included in the Eton MS.
Organist of
1484 - 1522

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John Capel Hanbury
1833 -
Subsequently took Holy Orders and became Curate of Pipe and Lyde, and Second Classical Master of Hereford Cathedral School, 1858.
Divinity Lecturer and Chaplain of Wadham College, Oxford, 1872.
Rector successively of Lower Bromley, Essex, 1880; and Bourton-on-the-Water, Gloucestershire, 1884. Hereford Chaplain at Wiesbaden, 1888.
Organist of
1856 - 1857?

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Thomas William Hanforth
6th Mar 1867 - 5th Jun 1948
Thomas William Hanforth was born at Hunslet, Leeds, March 6, 1867. Chorister in York Minster. Pupil of W. H. Garland and Dr. J. Naylor.
Organist to Archbishop Thomson, 1885.
Deputy-Organist of York Minster, 1891.
Bandmaster 4th West Riding York Vol. Artillery, 1900-1903.
Conductor of various choirs in the district.
Composer of Church Music, Pianoforte pieces, Organ Music, Etc.
Organist of
1892
Thomas William Hanforth Thomas William Hanforth
Thomas William Hanforth

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Appointment At Sheffield
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Egerton Barnardiston Harding
Egerton Barnardiston Harding was a nephew of Dr. Pusey Went on to be Master at the Priory School, Bath
Organist of
1872 - 1872

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Joseph Naylor Hardy
1860 - 17th Mar 1939
Joseph Naylor Hardy was a pupil of J. Emmerson (his predecessor at Wakefield), Dr. Spark, Dr. Creser, and Dr. Corbett.
Died March 17th 1939. Buried at Wakefield cemetery
Organist of
Roman Catholic Chapel, Wakefield, 1875;
West Parade Chapel, Wakefield, 1878;
1886 -

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Logo, Newspaper article Obituary
Mr. Joseph Hardy, formerly music teacher Silcoates School and organist at Wakefield Cathedral, has died his home at Wakefield, aged 79. He was a fellow the Royal College of Organists, and was organist and choirmaster at Wakefield Cathedral for several years.

Yorkshire Post and Leeds Intelligencer
Tuesday 21 March 1939
(www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk)
Joseph John Harris
1799 - 10th Feb 1869
Joseph John Harris was born in London, 1799.
Chorister in the Chapel Royal.
Died February 10, 1869. Buried in Harpurhey Cemetery.
Composer of Anthems, Glees, a selection of Psalm Tunes, "The Cathedral Daily Service," consisting of the Versicles, Litany, Etc., with music, Etc.
For the occasion of the laying of the foundation stone of the new tower of the Cathedral, in 1864, Harris composed an Anthem, "The Lord is my strength."
Organist of
St. Olave's, Southwark, 1823;
Blackburn Parish Church, 1828;
1848 - 1869 (having previously been Choirmaster, and Joint-Organist with Sudiow).

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William Henry Harris
28th Mar 1883 - 6th Sep 1973
William Henry Harris was born in London, March 28, 1883.
A Chorister in Holy Trinity, Tulse Hi11.
Pupil-Assistant-Organist of St. David's Cathedral.
Lord Charles Bruce Scholar at the Royal College of Music, 1899-1902, studying the organ under Sir Walter Parratt.
Accompanist to the (London) Bach Choir.
Assistant organist of the Temple Church.
Assistant-Organist of Lichfield Cathedral, holding this appointment concurrently with those of Organist of St. Augustine's, Edgbaston, and Professor of Counterpoint, Etc., at the Birmingham and Midland Institute.
His compositions include a Setting for baritone solo, chorus, and orchestra, of Francis Thompson's "The Hound of Heaven." [Carnegie Award, 1919.]
Organist of
St. John the Baptist, Kensington;
Wimbledon Parish Church;
Ewell Parish Church
1919 - 1929
1929 1933
1933 -
William Henry Harris William Henry Harris
William Henry Harris

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Basil Harwood
11th Apr 1859 -
Basil Harwood was born at Woodhouse, Olveston, Gloucestershire, April 11, 1859.
He was the son of Edward Harwood, J.P.
Educated at Charterhouse, and Trinity College, Oxford.
Pupil of J. L. Roeckel, Mrs. Roeckel, George Riseley, and Dr. C. W. Corfe.
Also studied at the Leipzig Conservatorium. Conductor of Oxford Orchestral Association, 1892-8, and Oxford Bach Choir, 1896.
President of the University Musical Club, 1881 and 1895.
Precentor of Keble College, 1892. Choragus of Oxford University, 1900.
Retired from the Organistship at Oxford, 1909.
Composer of Settings of Psalms 86 and 137. a Motet, Church Music, a Concerto for Organ and Orchestra, Organ pieces, Pianoforte pieces, Songs, Etc.
Organist of
Trinity College, Oxford, 1878;
St. Barnabas', Pimlico, 1883;
, 1887 - 1892
1892 - 1909

You Tube link iconOrgan Sonata No. 1
1st movement
Wellington Town Hall
Robert Costin
You Tube link iconO How Glorious Is the Kingdom
organist Basil Harwood organist Basil Harwood
Basil Harwood

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B.A., 1881; M.A., 1884.,
Extract: A short historical account of the degrees in music at Oxford and Cambridge.
(Williams, C. F. Abdy)
John Hasted
Chants by John Hasted are contained in Warren's "Chanter's Hand Guide," 1850.
Organist of
1784 - 1794

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James Hawkins (Snr)
c.1658 - 18th Oct 1729
James Hawkins (Snr)was a Chorister in St. John's College, Cambridge.
Ely Cathedral is indebted to this indefatigable musician for its valuable collection of MS. scores and part-books, carefully preserved to this day.
He also left behind him a large number of original compositions, those at Ely amounting to as many as seventeen Services and seventy-five Anthems!
He died the 18th of October 1729 and was buried in the South Transept of Ely Cathedral.
Organist of
1682(3) - 1729

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Logo, Newspaper article The following is the inscription on his tomb:-
"Under this marble
(Among many of his relations)
Lieth the body of James Hawkins, B.M.,
46 Years Organist of this Church;
Eminent in his Profession,
Regular in the discharge of his Duty,
Chearful and friendly in his Deportment.
He died the 18th of October 1729.
In the 67th year of his Age."
James Hawkins (Jnr)
James Hawkins was the son of James Hawkins (Snr), Mus.B., Organist of Ely Cathedral.
In 1728 he received notice of dismissal from the Dean and Chapter for insolent and rude behaviour to them, unless he made amends. This be appears to have done.
His Anthem, " O praise the Lord," is to be found in the Ely and Tudway Collections.
Organist of
1714 - 1759

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John Hawkshaw (Snr)
According to the Cathedral records, leases were granted to him in 1645 and 1647, but he is not mentioned as either Vicar Choral or Organist until after the Restoration, when in 1661 he appears to have been elected to the former post, which he held until his death in 1688.
His appointment as Vicar Choral of St. Patrick's Cathedral is dated 1660, when he was also made Organist there "during the absence of Mr. Randall Jewet" Jewitt had returned to England on the breaking up of the Cathedral Establishment at the Rebellion (see his appointment at Chester Cathedral). He was evidently expected to resume his duties in Dublin after the Restoration, and, as he failed to do so, Hawkshaw was permanently appointed in his place.
Organist of
1661 - 1678
1661 - 1688

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John Hawkshaw (Jnr)
Son of John Hawkshaw Snr.
Organist of
1632 - 1642
1678 - 1685

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Henry Hayden
c.1773 - 1848
Henry Hayden was a Chorister of Norwich Cathedral, and pupil of Dr. Beckwith there.
Appointed Organist and Singing-man at St. Asaph Cathedral at the age of twenty.
Buried at Llanbeblig, 1848.
There is some Church Music by him in the MS. Books of the Cathedral.
Organist of
1794 - 1834

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William Robert Hayden
- 1833
On his tombstone in the St. Asaph Cathedral Churchyard he is described as Organist, but he must have been Deputy-Organist for his father.
Organist of
1829 - 1833

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Philip Hayes
Bap. 17th Apr 1738 – 19th Mar 1797
Philip Hayes was the son of the William Hayes.
Born at Shrewsbury, 1738.
Chorister in the Chapel Royal. Pupil of his father. (Is said to have been Organist of Christ Church Cathedral, Oxford, 1763-1765 and to have been displaced by Thomas Norris.)
Gentleman of the Chapel Royal, 1767.
University Professor of Music, 1777.
Died suddenly, in London, March 19. 1797. Buried in St. Paul's Cathedral.
Composer of an Oratorio, "Prophecy," Odes, a Masque, Church Music, Glees, Songs, Concertos for Organ or Harpsichord, &c. Author of "Memoirs of Prince William Henry, Duke of Gloucester."
Organist of
1776
1777
1790
Philip Hayes organist Philip Hayes
Philip Hayes

Photo credit: Magdalen College, University of Oxford

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When the Grand Commemoration of Handel, which took place in May, 1784, was in contemplation, two very pompous gentlemen, Dr. Hayes of Oxford and Dr. Miller of Doncaster, came to Town to give their gratuitous assistance as conductors by beating time.
After several meetings and some bickering's, it was at length agreed that Dr. Hayes should conduct the first act, and Dr. Miller the second. When the time of performance had arrived, and Mr. Cramer, the leader, had just tapt his bow, (the signal for being ready,) and looked round to catch the eyes of the performers, he saw to his astonishment a till gigantic figure with an immense powdered toupee, full dressed, with a bag and sword, and a huge roll of parchment in his hand.
'Who is that gentleman?' said Mr. Cramer. Dr. Hayes,' was the reply. 'What is he going to do?' 'To beat time.' 'Be so kind,' said Mr. Cramer, 'to tell the gentleman, that when he has sat down I will begin.' The Doctor, who never anticipated such a set down as this, took his seat, and Mr. Cramer did begin.

- W.T. Parke's "Musical Memoirs," Vol. I., P. 39.)
Logo, Newspaper article DEATH
It is with regret we announce to the mufical world, the death of the celebrated Doctor Philip Hayes, profeffor at the Univerfity of Oxford. This gentleman lately came to town for the purpofe of prefiding over the concert for the benefit of the new Mufical Fund. He dreffed himfelf on Sunday morning in order to attend at the Chapel Royal, St. James's, but was fuddenly feized with the fymptoms of diffulution and in a very fhort period expired.

Hampshire Chronicle
Saturday 25 March 1797
(www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk)

Degrees logo- 1763.
Mus. Bac. Philip Hayes, of Magd. Coll., son of William Hayes, was Organist of Ch. Ch. from 1763 to 1765 ; Gentleman of the Chapel Royal, 1767: Organist of New College, in succession to Richard Church, 1776, and Magdalen, 1777, in which year he succeeded his father as Professor of Music and proceeded Mus. Doc. He became Organist of St. John's College in 1790, in succession to Thomas Norris, and died in London suddenly in 1797, and was buried at St. Paul's. He was extremely corpulent, and was supposed to be the largest man in England. Among his compositions are six Concertos for organ, harpsichord, or pianoforte, 1769; eight Anthems, 1780; "Prophecy," an Oratorio, performed at Oxford, 1781; catches, glees, canons, 1785; an "Ode," performed at Cambridge, 1785; catches and glees, 1789; "Ode for St. Cecilia's Day," by John Oldham; "Telemacbus," a masque, and a number of single anthems, songs, and glees.

Extract: A short historical account of the degrees in music at Oxford and Cambridge.
(Williams, C. F. Abdy)
William Hayes
1706 - 27th Jul 1777
William Hayes was born at Hanbury, Worcestershire, December, 1706.
He was a Chorister in Gloucester Cathedral, and afterwards pupil of William Hine.
Conductor of the Worcester Festival of 1734.
University Professor of Music, Oxford, 1742.
Conductor of the Gloucester Festival of 1763.
Died at Oxford, July 27, 1777. Buried in the Churchyard of St. Peter-in-the-East, Oxford.
Composer of Church Music, Cantatas, Odes, Etc.
Author of "Remarks on Mr. Avison's Essay on Musical Expression."
This is available as a free to download PDF file
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Organist of
St. Mary's, Shrewsbury, 1729;
1731 - 1734
1734 - 1777
William Hayes organist William Hayes organist
William Hayes

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Logo, Newspaper article DEATH
On Sunday morning died, aged 70, at Oxford, Dr. William Hayes, Organist of Magdalen College, and Professor of Music in that University.
He had the degree of Doctor of Music conferred upon him in the Theatre, at the opening of the Radcliffe Library in April 1749.
A man whose Memory will be dear to Society as long as the Voice of Harmony and the Praises of Christian Virtues are heard in the World

Manchester Mercury
Tuesday 05 August 1777
(www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk)
Thomas Haylett
c.1794 - 3rd Oct 1843
Retired in 1841.
Died 3rd October 1843. Buried October 5, 1843 (aged 49), in St. John's Cemetery,
Organist of
1824 - 1841

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Logo, Newspaper article Anecdote
The following amusing anecdote concerning Thomas Haylett is related by his successor at Chester Cathedral, Dr. J. C. Bridge :-
"One day Haylett, according to custom, had been teaching in Warrington, whence he duly returned in the evening to Chester. Upon opening the door of the coach he discovered the huge figure of a man stretched across two seats. As the occupant seemed disinclined to move his portly figure, Haylett reminded him that the coach was constructed to hold more than one passenger. The traveller then removed his feet, but uttered not a word. Haylett thereupon remarked that it was 'a fine night.' Silence greeted even this meteorological utterance. Similar observations were treated in like manner, with the result that Haylett held his peace, but only till Chester-the destination of the pair-was reached. Addressing his fellow-traveller for the last time, Haylett said to him, 'I think it right to inform you, sir, that you are a d--d disagreeable fellow.' This anathema caused the silent one to remove his muffler and thus unmask his features. The process revealed to Haylett's astonished gaze the face of Canon Slade, one of the Cathedral dignitaries, who was on his way to take up residence. The Canon, however, treated the matter very good-humouredly and often reminded Haylett of the joke."
Leighton George Hayne
28th Feb 1836 - 3rd Mar 1883
Leighton George Hayne was born at Exeter, February 28, 1836.
Precentor Queen's College, Oxford, 1860.
Took Holy Orders, 1861.
Coryphæus of Oxford University, 1863.
Vicar of Heiston, 1866.
Precentor of Eton, 1867.
Rector of Mistley (Essex), 1871.
Died at Bradfield (Essex), March 3, 1883.
Composer of Psalm Tunes, Etc.
Editor (with the Rev. H. W. Sargeant) of "The Merton Tune Book."
The organ was his special hobby. He had a large instrument of five manuals built in the music room of Eton College. This was eventually divided between the churches of Mistley and Bradfield.
Organist of
Queens College Oxford 1857
1867 - 1871

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Degrees logo1856.

Mus. Bac. (Rev.) Leighton George Hayne, Queen's College.
Born in 1836.
Organist of Queen's, 1857;
Mus. Doc., 1860;
Precentor of Queen's, 1860;
Coryphæus of the University, 1863.
He was appointed Vicar of Heiston in 1866 and Rector of Mistley in 1871.
Succentor of Eton from 1867 to 1871.
He died in 1883.


Extract: A short historical account of the degrees in music at Oxford and Cambridge.
(Williams, C. F. Abdy)

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Logo, Newspaper article Death of Rev. Dr. Hayne
We have to announce, with great regret, the death, after a long illness, of the Rev. Leighton George Hayne, Mus. Doc, Rector of Mistley-cum-Bradfield, and for many years Coryphæus of the University of Oxford.
Dr. Hayne was highly distinguished as a musician, both as an organist and a composer- and he was Suecentor of Eton College from 1867-1871. He then succeeded his father the late Rev. R. J. Hayne, D.D., as Rector of Mistley and Bradfield, and devoted himself with untiring zeal to the duties of a country Clergyman.
He was very munificent in his gifts to both his parishes. To Bradfield he gave a very fine and mellifluous organ, as a memorial of his father ; a spacious Vestry attached to the parish Church ; and just previously to his last illness, he had erected, at his own cost, a large parish room for the purpose of parochial gatherings.
To the parish Church of St. Mary's, Mistley, be presented one of the largest and finest organs in the County. Scarcely could he have left a more fitting memorial of his genius as a musician, and his devotion as a Clergyman.
He has died at the comparatively early age of 47, and leaves a widow and an only son to lament most of all his loss.

Essex Standard
Saturday 10 March 1883
(www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk)
Aaron Upjohn Hayter
16th Dec 1799 - 28th Jul 1873
Aaron Upjohn Hayter was born at Gillingham, December 16, 1799. Chorister in Salisbury Cathedral, and afterwards pupil of and assistant to A. T. Corfe. Succeeded C. J. Dare as Organist of Hereford.
Conductor of the Hereford Festival of 1819.
Resigned the post at Hereford, and became Organist of the Collegiate Church, Brecon.
Went to America, 1835. Organist of Grace Church, New York. Organist of 1837. Organist (and Musical Adviser) to the Handel and Haydn Society, 1838.
Died in Boston, 1873.
There is a MS. Evening Service in E flat by him, at Hereford, and an Anthem, "Withdraw not Thou," is included in the Rev. W. Cooke's Words of Anthems, printed for the use of Hereford Cathedral (1825).
His name is mentioned in "Musical and Personal Recollections during Half-a-Century," by Henry Phillips; and the valuable services which he rendered to the Handel and Haydn Society, in Boston, are recorded in the published "History" of that Society, compiled by Charles C. Perkins, and issued in Boston, 1886.
Organist of
1818 - 1820

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John Heath
In the Rochester Cathedral Treasurer's book of 1614 he appears as Organist, but his Patent could not be found.
In the Survey of the Parsonage of Chatham (Parlia- mentary Surveys, 1649, Lambeth Library) is the following: In 1608, the Dean 'granted unto Phillipp Heath and John Heath sonne of the sayd Phillipp Heath the office of Clerke and Organiste dureing the tearme of their naturall lives and the longest liver of either of them, with the annuall ffee or stipend of Twelve pounds of lawfull English Money, issueing and payeable out of the foresaide parsonage of Chatham. . . . Phillipp Heath is deceased. John Heath aged about sixty years.'
John Heath appears as Organist of the Cathedral so late as 1668.
[Heath is probably the composer of Anthems mentioned under this name in Clifford's Collection, and an Evening Service in the Peterhouse Collection at Cambridge.]

Organist of
in 1614

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Paul Heath
Admonished by the Dean and Chapter of Bristol Cathedral in 1667, 1678, and 1682.
Chapter Minute of December 13, 1682 :-
"It appearing to the Deane and Chapter that Paule Heath, Organist and Master of the Choristers, hath had severall admonitions for keeping a Disorderly Alehouse, Debauching the Choirmen and other disorders there, and neglecting the service of the Church and beeing now Credibly Informed that the said Paule Heath doth still keep ill-order in his house, and hath suffered one Rouch, a barber, to trime in his house on the Lord's Day, commonly called Sunday . . , the said Deane and Chapter .. did .. order and Decree to remove expell and dissmisse the said Paal Heath from his said office and place of Organist and Master of the Choristers."
In 1683 the usual salary is entered, but the Organist's name is not mentioned.
In 1684 appears "de stipendio Pauli Heath Qrganistæ et Magistro Choristarum ab antiqua debit £10 cum augmentatione et concessa .. £22"

Organist of
1669 - 1682

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Edward Heathcote
c.1797 - 21st Jan 1835
Prior to appointment at Southwell Cathedral he was organist of Bakewell Church, Derbyshire, for the use of which he compiled a book of Words of Anthems.
Died 1835. Buried in the South-East portion of the Cathedral Yard.
Set to music the Ordination Hymn, "Come, Holy Ghost, Eternal God." Some of his Church Music in MS. is at Southwell, including a once popular Service in B fiat.
Organist of
Bakewell Church, Derbyshire
1818 - 1835

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Stephen Heather
1748 - 14th Nov 1831
Stephen Heather was born 1748.
Lay Clerk of St. George's Chapel Windsor.
Died at Windsor, November 14, 1831
Organist of
1788 - 1831

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Andrew Hecht (Hight)
- 1693
Andrew Hecht was a Dutchman.
Two of his Anthems "Hope" and "Out of the deep," are included in the Cathedral Library.
A writ appears to have been taken out against him in 1670 by John Jameson, Clericus Rivestri (Vestry Clerk), for striking him in the Church; but the suit was afterwards withdrawn.
Buried in the Cathedral March 31st 1693

Organist of
1663? - 1693

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Thomas Hecht
- 5th Apr 1734
Thomas Hecht was the son of Andrew Hecht,
Was admitted Organist of Lincoln in succession to his father, at a salary of £30 per annum, but declined office.
Matriculated 1714.
Died April 5, 1734. Buried in St. Ebbe's Churchyard.
He left £120 towards the enlargement of the College organ.
According to his will he was cousin to Edward Thom(p)son, Organist of Salisbury Cathedral.
Organist of
1693 - 1695
1695 - 1734

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Richard Henman
Richard Henman was dismissed from his appointment at Exeter on June 27, 1741, "for his long absence and disorderly life."
An Anthem, "Have mercy," by Henman, in the Ely Collection, is probably his composition.
Organist of
1694 - 1741

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William Henshaw
1791 - 30th Sep 1877
William Henshaw was born 1791.
Died at Clapham,September 30. 1877. Buried in Nunhead Cemetery.
Composer of Hymn Tunes, Chants, Etc.
Organist of
1813 - 1862

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Daniel Henstridge
? - 1736
Appointed Organist on probation at Canterbury Cathedral, December, 1698, one of the conditions being that he should take upon himself to teach not more than ten King's Scholars to sing "Talus his Service"; another, that the new Organist "shall assist Porter as far as he is capable in instructing him on the organ."
Sworn and admitted Organist and Master of the Choristers, June, 1699.
Died 1736. Buried in Canterbury Cathedral.
The Organ parts to some of his compositions (including a Service in D) are still extant in MS. There are some Anthems by him in Croft's "Divine Harmony."
Organist of
1666 - 1673
At one time thought to be his father, current thinking is it is the same man.

1674 - 1698
1699 - 1736

Dictionary of National Biography
James Hesletine (Heseltine)
c. 1690 – 20th Jun 1763
James Hesletine was a pupil of
Dr. Blow.
John Blow
1649 - 1st Oct 1708
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He was Organist of St. Katherine's Church at the Tower, London, which post he retained on his appointment to Durham Cathedral, performing the London office by deputy.
Died 1763. Buried in the Cathedral.
Composer of many Anthems, Etc. The greater part of these were destroyed by him in revenge for some slight by the Dean and Chapter of Durham. His Anthem, "Praise the Lord," is extant in the Cathedral books.
There is a portrait of Heseltine in the Music School at Oxford.
Organist of
1710 - 1763

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Logo, Newspaper article Property Sale
To be SOLD, And entered upon at Lammas, or May-day next.
SEVERAL DWELLING-HOUSES, late belonging to James HESLETINE, of the City of Durham, Organist, deceased. Situated and lying together at Sunderland near the Sea, in the County Durham, a Lane called Wilson's Lane; one of the raid Houses adjoining upon the High-street, and the others extending downwards towards the Low-street. All the said Houses are holden by lease for three Lives, under the Hon. and Right Rev. the Lord Bishop of Durham, and the present Lease was renewed in March last. Enquire Mr Braems Wilder, in Durham; or Mr Geo. Taylor, Attorney, in Sunderland.
Also to be sold, and entered upon May-day next, A FARM of LAND, late belonging to the above said Mr Hesletine, situated between Merrington and Windleston, in the County of Durham, consisting about thirty-one Acres of Arable, Meadow, and Pasture Ground, exceedingly well watered and fenced, with a good Dwelling-House, Barn, Byar, Stable, and other Conveniences upon the same, in good Repair, most of them being lately built. These Premisses arc Holden by Lease for twenty-one Years, under the Hon. the Dean and Chapter Durham, more than Seventeen which are yet to come and unexpired. For further Particulars, enquire the Mr Wheler, and or Mr Robert Wood, at Merrington.

Newcastle Chronicle
Saturday 01 October 1768
(www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk)
George Henry Phillips Hewson
George Henry Phillips Hewson was born 1881 in Dublin.
Dublin University Chorister of St. Patrick's Cathedral, and afterwards Sub-Organist there.
Professor of the Organ at the Royal Irish Academy of Music.
Composer of Church Music, Part-songs, Etc.
Organist of
Chapel Royal, Dublin, 1907;
1917 - 1920
1920 - 1960

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Logo, Newspaper article JEWSON, Dr. George Henry Phillips (1881-1972)

Born in Dublin on 19 November 1881; died in Dublin in November 1972.
A chorister of St. Patrick's Cathedral, Dublin (from 1889).
Attended St. Patrick's Cathedral Grammar School and Trinity College, Dublin where he graduated B.Mus. (1903), B.A. (1905), D.Mts. (191 it) and M. A. (1928).
Organist of Stiltorgan Church (from 1898), Clontarf Church (from 1900 and the Zion Church (from 1901). Sub organist of St. Patrick's Cathedral, Dublin (from 1902).
Organist and master of the choristers of the Chapel Royal, Dublin Castle (from 1907); Armagh Cathedral (916-1920) and St. Patrick's Cathedral, Dublin, where he succeeded Charles Marchant (from 1920). Remained in office at St. Patrick's until 1960, when he was succeeded by William Greig, who had been a chorister at St. Patrick's and who had served as Hewson's assistant for 18 years.
Hewson was professor of music of Trinity College, Dublin (1935-1962).

Extract:- Dictionary of Composers for the Church in Great Britain and Ireland
Edward Higgins
- 1769
Edward Higgins was appointed a Vicar Choral of Christ Church and St. Patrick's Catnedrals, Dublin, 1765.
Buried in the North Transept of Bristol Cathedral, 1769.
Probably the composer of a Chant in F which appears in several collections.
Organist of
1759 - 1765

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Logo, Newspaper article Higgins, who came to Bristol in 1759 from Salisbury and was also a vicar choral in Dublin, quit his cathedral post in 1765 but remained in Bristol, dying in King's Square in 1769.
He was also a singer, performing in Acis and Galatea at the Assembly Room in 1765.
In 1759 he advertised that he instructed gentlemen and ladies in music on the harpsichord, violin, violoncello, and guitar, as well as in singing, for the usual price of £6 6s per annum if waited on, or £4 4s in the boarding schools.
Extract :- Music and the Wesleys.
Thomas Hill
"Mr. Thomas Hill, the Organist, was reprimanded for Tipling and frequenting the Cockpit." (Chapter Minutes, Carlisle Cathedral, June, 1817.) There is a Chant by him in Bennett and Marshall's Collection, 1829.
Organist of
1785 - 1833

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John Hilton
1565 - 1609?
John Hilton is mentioned as Organist at Lincoln Cathedral(in 1593 and 1594), but he was probably only deputy to Butler.
He was a counter-tenor, and in 1593 the Lincoln Cathedral Chapter gave him 30s. for his services in arranging for the acting of two Comedies by the chorister's.
Some Church Music by him is extant in MS.

Organist of
?
1594 - 1612?

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Henry Hinde
6th Aug 1641
In a book entitled "The Life of
Elias Ashmole, Elias Ashmole
23 May 1617 – 18 May 1692
English antiquary, politician, officer of arms, astrologer and student of alchemy.
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Esq.," occurs the following entry in his diary:-
"Mr. Henry Hinde, Organist of the Cathedral (Lichfield], who died the 6th of August, 1641, taught me the virginels and organ."
There is an Anthem by him, "Sing Praises," in Barnard's Collection.
Organist of
1637 - 1641

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William Hine
1687 - 28th Aug 1730
William Hine was born at Brightwell. 1687.
Chorister in Magdalen College, Oxford.
A pupil of
Jeremiah Clark. Jeremiah Clarke
c.1669 - 1st Dec 1707
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It is said that, in consideration of his musical skill and gentlemanly qualities, his salary was augmented by £20 a year.
Died August 28, 1730. Buried in Gloucester Cathedral Cloisters.
Some Anthems and an Organ Voluntary by him were published after his death, under the title of "Harmonia Sacra Glocestriensis," edited by his widow.
He was joint composer. With Hall, Junr., of the Morning Service known as Hall and Hine in E flat.:
Organist of
1710 - 1730
Organist William Hine
William Hine

Portrait of William Hine presented to the Holywell Music Room in Oxford by Dr. Philip Hayes, son of Hine's pupil Dr. William Hayes
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John Hoddinott
1688 - 23rd Aug 1731
Chorister in 1700. Buried in the North Cloister of Worcester Cathedral.
Organist of
1724 - 1731

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Robert Hodge
- 1709
Vicar and Organist of Wells Cathedral.
While at Wells he was corrected and admonished for breaking windows, July 5, 1688.
On August 7 1688 £5 a quarter and the stall of Henstridge were appropriated to him, but only during the pleasure of the Dean and Chapter.
He was elected a Vicar Choral of St. Patrick's Cathedral, 1693 and a Vicar Choral of Christ Church Cathedral, 1695.
The Chapter minutes of St. Patrick's, under the date June 9, 1698, state that "Robert Hodge resigns the post of Organist, and Daniel Rosingrave is appointed."
Hodge afterwards became Master of the Choristers at Christ Church Cathedral, and died 1709.
Organist of
1688 - 1689
1694 - 1698

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Frederick William Hogan
23rd Aug 1845 1st Dec 1921
Frederick William Hogan was born at Reichill, Armagh, August 23, 1845.
A pupil of Robert Tune, at Armagh, and Dr. J. C. Marks, at Cork.
Choirmaster to the Liandaft Diocesan Choir Union, 1866.
Took Holy Orders, and held several Curacies from 1870.
Vicar of All Saints', Eglantine, Co. Down, 1883.
Composer of Church Music, Etc.
Organist of
1866 - 1868

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George Holmes
c1680? - 1721?
George Holmes was probably the son of Thomas Holmes (a Lay Vicar of Winchester Cathedral), and grandson of John Holmes (Organist of Winchester Cathedral, and afterwards of Salisbury Cathedral).
At one time Organist to the Bishop of Durham.
Appointed a Junior Vicar, 1707. Died 1721. Buried in Lincoln Cathedral Cloisters.
Composer of several Anthems, two of which, "Arise, shine, O daughter of Zion" (composed on the Union with Scotland. 1706), and "I will love Thee, O Lord," are included in the Tudway and Ely Collections, and an Ode for St. Cecilia's Day. His setting of the Burial Sentences is still sung in Lincoln Cathedral at funerals. It has recently been published under the editorship of Dr. G. J. Bennett.
Organist of
1705 - 1721

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John Holmes
c1575 - 30th Jan 1629
Adrian Batten (Organist of St. Paul's) and Edward Lowe (Organist of Christ Church, Oxford) were among his pupils.
Composer of Church Music, Madrigals, Etc.
Contributor to "The Triumphs of Oriana."
Organist of
? - 1610
1602 - 1610

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Edmund Hooper
c.1553 - 14th Jul 1621
Edmund Hooper is believed to be the first regular appointment of Organist at Westminster Abbey.
Born at North Halberton, Devon, and said to have been a Chorister in Exeter Cathedral.
Died July 14, 1621. Buried in the Abbey Cloisters. Also Gentleman and Organist of the Chapel Royal.
Composer of Church Music. Contributor to Este's "Whole Booke of Psalms."
His Patent (for life) from the Dean and Chapter as Organist of Westminster Abbey bears the date May 9, 1906, one having previously been taken out by him as Master of the Choristers on December 3, 1588
According to the Abbey records he was occasionally employed in "mending the organs" and "pricking new song-books."
Organist of
1603 - 1621
1606 - 1621

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Edward John Hopkins
30th Jun 1818 - 4th Feb 1901
Edward John Hopkins was the brother of John Hopkins. of Rochester Cathedral, and cousin of Dr. J. L. Hopkins, of Rocheste and Trinity College, Cambridge.
Born at Westminster, June 30, 1818.
Chorister in the Chapel Royal.
Pupil of Thomas Forbes Walmisley (the father of Dr. T. A. Walmisley).
One of the Founders of the (Royal) College of Organists.
Granted the honorary degree of Mus.D. by the Archbishop of Canterbury, 1882.
A testimonial was presented to him on attaining his Jubilee as an Organist in 1884, and also on his completion of fifty years office as Organist to the Temple Church in 1893.
He was for many years Professor of the Organ at the Royal Normal College for the Blind, Norwood.
Died February 4, 1901. Buried in Hampstead Cemetery.
Composer of Church Music, Organ pieces, Madrigals, Songs. Part-songs. Etc.
Arranger of Organ Music. Editor of Madrigals, Organ pieces, Hymnals, Chant Books, Etc.
Joint-Author, with of "
The Organ: The Otgan
ISBN 10: 0952818469
ISBN 13: 9780952818465
its History and Construction" and Author of a similar work to be issued by Messrs. Novello.
Lecturer on various musical subjects.

Organist of
Mitcham Parish Church, 1834;
St. Peter's, Islington, 1838;
St. Luke's, Berwick Street, 1841;
1843 - 1898
Edward John Hopkins Edward John Hopkins
Edward John Hopkins

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Dr. Edward John Hopkins, who has died at the age of eighty-three, had lived in the reigns of five British sovereigns. So long ago as the year 1826 he was a chorister of the Chapel Royal, and he got his first post as organist in a London just at the beginning of the Victorian Reign. This was at St. Peter's Islington, whence he went in 1841, to St Luke's, Berwick Street.
In 1843 he began that long connection, as organist, with the Temple Church which ended only in 1898. During that period of over half a century Dr. Hopkins made the Temple Church the haunt of lovers of English music, and was himself the composer of a number of well-known anthems and hymn-tunes.
Mendelssohn was the only foreign master under whose influence he allowed himself to come; and he was the first to play the famous "Wedding MArch" as an organ voluntary.

Illustrated London News
Saturday 16 February 1901
(www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk)
John Hopkins
30th Apr 1822 - 27th Aug 1900
John Hopkins was born April 30, 1822 at Westminster.
Cousin to the J. L. Hopkins, and brother to Dr. E. J. Hopkins.
A Chorister in St. Paul's Cathedral.
Died August 27, 1900.
There is a mural tablet to his memory in the South Aisle of the Choir.
Composer of Church Music, Organ pieces, Pianoforte pieces, Etc.

Organist of
Mitcham Parish Church, 1838;
St. Stephen's, Islington, 1839;
Holy Trinity, Islington, 1843;
St. Mark's, Jersey, 1845;
St. Michael's, Chester Square, London, 1846;
and the Parish Church, Epsom. which he resigned on his appointment to Rochester Cathedral in 1856.
1856 - 1900

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John Larkin Hopkins
25th Nov 1819 – 25th Apr 1873
John Larkin Hopkins was born 25 November 1819 at Westminster.
Cousin to Dr. E. J. Hopkins.
Chorister in Westminster Abbey.
First President of the Westminster Abbey Glee Club, 1841.
Died at Ventnor, April 25, 1873.
Buried in Ventnor Cemetery.
Composer of Church Music, Glees, Songs, Etc.

Organist of
1841 - 1856
1856 - 1873
Cambridge University, 1856

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Logo, Newspaper article Death
We regret to have announce the death of Dr. John Larkin Hopkins, which took place Ventnor, in the Isle Wight, on Friday evening, the 25th of April.
Dr. J. L. Hopkins was born in 1820, and was in his fifty-third year at the time his decease.
His father held the position of first clarinet player in this country, and the musician whose death we deplore was himself a performer of no mean excellence on the flute.
John Larkin Hopkins was educated for some years as a chorister at Westminster Abbey, and became the organist Rochester Cathedral in remaining there for several years.
He afterwards succeeded Dr. Walmisley as organist of Trinity College, Cambridge, which position he held at the time of his decease.
The author of great number of chants and services for the church, and some excellent glees and part music, was widely known and esteemed, and personal knowledge of the man served to deepen the respect enforced by his compositions.

Norfolk News
Saturday 17 May 1873
(www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk)
John Horan
26th Feb 1831 - 1st Feb 1908
John Horan was born at Drogheda, February 26, 1831.
A pupil of his father.
Chorister in Christ Church Cathedral, and frequently deputised as Organist there.
Apprenticed to
Telford and Telford, William Telford
1809 - 1885
Irish organ builder.
He established himself as William Telford, Organ Builder, in 1830, with the name of the firm changing in 1847 to Telford & Telford, and in 1870 to Telford & Sons.
The firm built a number of organs during this period, ranging in size from the 47-stop instrument for St Peter's College, Radley, to small church barrel organs.
Other important organs include those for Trinity College, Dublin (1838), Killala Cathdral, Co. Mayo (1838, still in original condition), the church of St Malachy, Belfast (1847), and St Eugene's Cathedral, Londonderry (1872).
organ builders, Dublin.
Solo Bass of Limerick Cathedral.
Assistant-Organist and Choirmaster of Christ Church Cathedral, 1873; succeeding to the full office on the death of Sir Robert Stewart.
Died February 1, 1908.
Composer of Services, Anthems, Etc.
Organist of
Booterstown Church;
St. John's, Sandymount;
St. Andrew's, Dublin
Adare Parish Church, 1856;
Tuam Cathedral, 1857;
Derry Cathedral, 1862;
1894 - 1907

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Logo, Newspaper article MR. JOHN HORAN
We regret to learn of the death of Mr. John Horan on Saturday last at St. Patrick's Hospital.
Mr. John Horan was organist and choir master of Christ Church Cathedral, and filled for many years a great space in the musical life of Dublin. He was most accomplished organist, and a really distinguished choir master. He was a native of Drogheda.
His first appointment as organist at Booterstown, and from this he passed in succession to Sandymount, St. Andrew's, Limerick Cathedral, Adare, Tuam, Derry, and St. Mary's, Dublin.
In 1873 he was appointed assistant organist and master of the choristers at Christ Church Cathedral, and on the death of Sir Robert Stewart in 1894 he became organist of the Cathedral.
His whole life and his great musical abilities were from this time given to the Cathedral, the only other engagement which he held being that of organist to Dublin Musical Society, a post which enabled him to prove that he was as much at home in secular as in ecclesiastical organ music.
His son, George Frederick, an organist and composer of exceptional ability, died some years ago, and his other son, Mr. John Horan, is a distinguished solo bass in Christ Church Choir.

Weekly Irish Times
Saturday 08 February 1908
(www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk)
Karl Friedrich Horn
1762 - 5th Aug 1830
Karl Friedrich Horn was born at Nordhausen, Saxony, 1762.
A pupil of Schroter(?)
He came to London, as valet to the Marquis of Stafford, in 1782. Afterwards became a teacher of music, and was Music Master to Queen Charlotte until 1811.
Died August 5, 1830.
Composer of Sonatas for the Pianoforte, Twelve Themes with variations for the Pianoforte, with an accompaniment for the Flute or Violin.
Author of a Treatise on Thorough Bass.
Collaborated with Samuel Wesley in the preparation of an English edition of J. S. Bach's "Wohltemperirte Clavier," which was published in 1810-12.
His son, Charles Edward Horn, was a celebrated Singer and Composer, whose songs "Cherry Ripe" and "I know a bank" have taken a place among our national ballads.
Organist of
1824 - 1830

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Frederick William Horncastle
1790? - 1828
Frederick William Horncastle was born in London, 1790 (?).
Chorister in the Chapel Royal.
Appointed a Gentleman of the Chapel Royal, 1826.
Died 1850.
Composer of a Mass, Glees, Songs, Pianoforte pieces, Etc.
In 1828 Horncastle collaborated with T. Cooke, Stansbury, Parry, Clifton, and Taylor, in a work entitled "The Passions" for the Melodists' Club.
Organist of
Stamford Hill Chapel

Armagh Cathedral 1816 - Dismissed 1823

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John Howe
John Howe was a Petty Canon and Organist.
Admonished by the Dean and Chapter of Carlisle Cathedral in 1692 for neglect of duty.
A certain John Howe was Mayor of Carlisle in 1683.
Organist of
1665 - 1693

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Organist of

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Walter Hoyle
Walter Hoyle was born at Exeter, 1873.
Articled pupil of Dr. D. J. Wood at Exeter Cathedral.
Sometime Organist of St. Petrock's, Exeter, and Sub-Organist of Coventry Cathedral.
Organist of
1898 - 1927

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Logo, Newspaper article CATHEDRAL ORGANIST PRESENTATION TO MR. WALTER HOYLE, F.R.C.O.
A large and representative gathering of Cathedral parishioners assembled at Palace lard, on Tuesday night, to bid farewell and God-speed to Mr. Walter Hoyle, who has been organist of Coventry Cathedral for the past 30 years.
As a token of their good wishes, Mr. Hoyle was presented with Grove's Dictionary of Music and Musicians, costly volumes, beautifully bound together with a cheque for £5O.
The first volume of the Dictionary contained the following illuminated inscription: "Presented, together with a cheque, to Walter Hoyle. esq., F.R.C.0., by his friends in Coventry as a token of gratitude for his thirty years' service an organist and choirmaster of the Cathedral Church of Saint Michael. Christmas Day, 1927."

MR. HOYLE'S RESPONSE
Replying. Mr. Hoyle said it hardly seemed 30 years he left Exeter for Coventry. He was delighted to see present so many of his old friends., for he had been gloriously happy at Coventry.
The reason he was leaving was because of his increasing deafness. Neither the service nor recitals gave him any trouble but the detail work was rather a worry, and he felt for the sake of those to whom he imparted instruction that it would be wise to have a change.


Coventry Herald
Friday 23 December 1927
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Thomas Hughes
- 1693
Thomas Hughes was Buried September 6, 1693.
Organist of
1686 - 1693

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Percy Clarke Hull
27th Oct 1878 - 31st Aug 1968
Percy Clarke Hull was born at Hereford, October 27. 1878.
Chorister in Hereford Cathedral under Drs. Colborne and G. R. Sinclair.
Pupil of Dr. Sinclair and afterwards Assistant-Organist of the Cathedral, 1896-1914.
Interned as a prisoner in Germany, 1914-1918.
Returned to England and was appointed Organist of Hereford Cathedral on Armistice Day, 1918.
Conductor of the Hereford Festivals from 1921, Hereford Choral Society, Herefordshire Orchestral Society, Lecturer in Music at Hereford Training College.
Organist of
1918 - 1949
Percy Clarke Hull Percy Clarke Hull
Percy Clarke Hull

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Logo, Newspaper article Sir Percy Clarke Hull
Sir Percy Clarke Hull. organist and master of the choristers at Hereford Cathedral for 31 years and one of the city's most distinguished musicians. has died in Farnham. Surrey. aged 89.
His death came only a day after the close of this year's Three Choirs Festival at Glourester-an event with which he was closely associated. Especially as a conductor for much of his life.
Sir Percy was educated at Hereford Cathedral School and became a cathedral chorister in 1889. In 1894 he was articled to Dr. J. R. Sinclair, then organist at the cathedral. and became assistant organist 18 months later.
Sir Percy formed a close friendship with the young Edward Elgar when the composer went to live in Hereford and was proud of the fact that he was the first person, apart from Elgar. to play the Enigma Variations. Elgar dedicated a number of works to Sir Percy, including the fifth Pomp and Circumstance march.
Sir Percy spent the 1914-18 war as a civilian internee in Germany and on his release in 1918. became organist and choirmaster at Hereford Cathedral, where he conducted his first Three Choirs Festival in 1921.
He retired as cathedral organist shortly after the 1949 festival, having been knighted in 1947.
In 1927, Sir Percy was offered the post of organist at Westminster Abbey although he had not applied for the position. but be declined because he said he believed in "making my work lie in the happiest places."
A memorial service will be held in Hereford Cathedral at a date to be announced. Cremation will take place at Aldershot tomorrow

Birmingham Daily Post - Tuesday 03 September 1968
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Hubert Walter Hunt
12th Jul 1865 - 1945
Hubert Walter Hunt was born at Windsor, July 12, 1865. Son of Thomas Hunt, for many years a Lay Clerk of St. George's Chapel, Windsor.
Chorister in St. George's Chapel and pupil of Sir George Elvey and Sir Walter Parratt.
Conductor of the Bristol Madrigal Society, 1915.
Editor of the Male-Voice Chant Book.
Was also an excellent violinist, and took a prominent part in many chamber music performances in Bristol and elsewhere.
Organist of
Clewer Parish Church, 1883:
Christ Church, Clapham, 1886;
St Jude's, South Kensington, 1887;
1901 -
Hubert Walter Hunt Hubert Walter Hunt
Hubert Walter Hunt

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John Hunt
30th Dec 1806 - 1st Nov 1842
John Hunt was born at Marnhull, Dorset, December 30, 1806.
Chorister in Salisbury Cathedral, and afterwards pupil of A. T. Corfe.
Lay Vicar of Lichfield Cathedral, 1827, and Organist of the Church attached to St. Johns Almshouses in that city.
Succeeded Dr. S. S. Wesley at Hereford Cathedral, 1835.
Conductor of the Hereford Musical Festivals.
Died November 1, 1842, from the results of a fall over a dinner wagon, laden with plates and glasses, which had carelessly been left in a dark part of the Cloisters after an Audit dinner. His adopted nephew. a Chorister in Hereford Cathedral, died three days afterwards from the effects of the shock of his uncle's death, and both bodies were buried in the same grave.
There is a window to his memory and that of his nephew in the North Aisle of the Choir of Hereford Cathedral.
A volume of his Glees and Songs, with a memoir prefixed, was published by subscription in 1843. His Tune, "Hereford" and a Double Chant are included in Hackett's "National Psalmody."
Organist of
1835 - 1842

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George Frederick Huntley
31st May 1859 - 4th Aug 1913
George Frederick Huntley was born at Datchet, May 31, 1859.
Pupil of Sir George Elvey and Drs. Keeton and Hancock.
Revived the Orchestral Services at Newcastle Cathedral during his organistship there, and was afterwards Conductor of the Church Orchestral Society in London.
Died at Hemel Hempstead, August 4, 1913
Composer of an Oratorio, "Dies Domini," Cantatas, Church Music, Operettas, Etc.
Organist of
St. George's. Kensington, 1880;
St. Andrew's, Westminster, 1890;
1894 - 1895
St. Peter's, Eaton Square, 1895.

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Charles Husbands
Possibly the Charles Husbands who was a Chorister in the Chapel Royal,and took part in the Coronation of James II.
Thought to be the son of William Husbands.
Organist of
1690 - 1691

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Logo, Newspaper article HUSBANDS, CHARLES [II] (1670-1692).
Child of the Chapel Royal, 1682 - 1687
Presumably this Charles was the son of Charles Husbands [A gentleman of the Chapel Royal] who was baptized at Windsor on 11 Dec 1670.
He is listed as a chorister at Christ Church, Oxford, between 1677 and 1684, but by 1682 had joined the Chapel Royal. He was last in the list of boys (and therefore probably the most junior of them) granted expenses for attending at Windsor from 22 April to 23 June and again from 8 July to 10 Sep 1682, By James IIs coronation on 23 Apr 1685 he was a 'senior' chorister. Warrants at his dismissal from the Chapel are dated 23 Nov 1687.
He became a singing-man at Christ Church, Oxford, serving from the second quarter of 1688 to the third quarter of 1690; in this last quarter he also received nine weeks' pay as organist. Evidently he was still active in the latter post in the first quarter of 1691 when 15s paid to 'the Organist for pricking Anthems for the Quire' was receipted by 'Charles Husbands.
A memorial in the Christ Church Divinity Chapel to 'CH Org. ob Feb 23 1691 act. 21' is believed to be his.

Extract:- A Biographical Dictionary of English Court Musicians, 1485-1714
John Husbands
Probably a relative of William and Charles Husbands, organists of Christ Church, Oxford
Organist of
1693 - 1720

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William Husbands
- 1701
Possibly a son of Charles Husbands, a Gentleman of the Chapel Royal, who died 1678.
Appointed Chaplain, 1690.
Organist of
1682 - 1690

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William Cooke states that William Husbands graduated MA at Christ Church in 1687 before joining the vicars choral at Hereford in 1692.

Around the end of the seventeenth century a number of distinguished musicians were to be found among the ranks of the Hereford vicars choral, and it is probable that they were founder members of the music society. As mentioned above, William Husbands, who joined the vicars choral in 1692, was formerly a senior member of the Mermaid Club, the prestigious Oxford musical society which met in Anthony Flail's tavern at Carfax.
Husbands may also have participated in Henry Aldrich's weekly meetings at Christ Church in Oxford where he served as chaplain and organist.
Husbands had been a boy chorister at Christ Church, entering in 1673; however, his adult career in Hereford was cut short by his premature death in 1701.
Extract:- Concert Life in Eighteenth-Century Britain
John Hutchinson
- 1657
John Hutchinson was probably a relative of Richard Hutchinson, of Durham.
There are three Anthems by him in the Durham Cathedral Library. Three Anthems by him are also included in the Ely Collection, one being entitled the Southwell Anthem.
Organist of

1633 -

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The Very Rev. A. P. Purey-Cust. late Dean of York, had in his possession some MS. notes by Dr. Naylor upon former Organists of York Minster, from which he very kindly favoured me with extracts. Speaking of John Hutchinson, Dr. Naylor says: "Canon Raine once shewed a copy of Morley's 'Introduction' (1597), and in it was the name— J. Hutchinson —written in a bold hand, and the Canon said that Hutchinson was a former Organist of York Minster."

Editors note

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Baptised in Durham on 2 July 1615. A son of Richard Hutchinson.
Organist of Southwell Minster (C1622-c1634). He may be the person of that name who was organist of York Minster from March 1634. A minor composer whose output included anthems, one of which, 'Of mortall man', was known as the 'Southwell' anthem. Also composed a setting of Psalm 130 'Out of the deep'.

Dictionary of Composers for the Church in Great Britain and Ireland
Richard Hutchinson
- 7th Jun 1646
Richard Hutchinson died June 7, 1646.
He was evidently considered a good Organist—"pæ-excellens fuit Organista" — but the Chapter Acts bear record to the fact that his character was not altogether exemplary, and he was reprimanded by the Dean for breaking the head of Toby Broking (one of the singing men) with a candlestick, in an alehouse, wounding him very dangerously.
There are three Anthems by him in the Cathedral books and in the Ely and Peterhouse (Cambridge) Collections.
According to the Cathedral Baptismal Registers, John Hutchinson, son of Richard Hutchinson, Organist, was baptized July 2, 1615.

Organist of
1614 - 1646?

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William Hutt
25th Aug 1843 - 18th Mar 1904
William Hutt was born August 25, 1843.
Chorister in Westminster Abbey.
Pupil of
James Turle, James Turle
5th Mar 1802 - 28th Jun 1882
Organist of Westminster Abbey
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and
Music Master of Winchester College, 1865.
Retired 1901.
Died at Littlehampton, March 18, 1904.
Organist of
St. Michael's, Queenhithe;
Berkeley Chapel, Mayfair;
Parish Church, Mitcham;
1865 - 1901

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Logo, Newspaper article DEATH OF MR. W. HUTT.
—The news of the death of Mr. William Hutt, lately organist at Winchester College, will be received, among old Wykehamists and others who knew him, with regret.
The event took place at Littlehampton on Friday, the 18th inst., in his sixty-first year. Mr. Hutt, who leaves a widow and a son and daughter, came to Winchester many years ago as a lay vicar (bass) in Winchester Cathedral choir. In 1865 be was appointed organist at Winchester College, a post he relinquished about three years ago, being succeeded by Dr. Sweeting.

Salisbury and Winchester Journal
Saturday 26 March 1904
(www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk)
Charles Frederick Hyde
c1855 - 17th Mar 1893
C. F. Hyde was the eldest son of the Rev. Charles Hyde, Dilton Marsh, Wilts.
A pupil of Sir Frederick Ouseley, at St. Michael's College, Tenbury.
He was at St. David's Cathedral during a period when only an American Organ was in use.
Died 1894, aged 38, at Giggleswick School, where he was Music Master.
Organist of
St. David's Cathedral
St. Paul's, Old Charlton, Kent;

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Logo, Newspaper article ORGAN OPENING AT GIGOLESWICK SCHOOL.
Shortly after the death, in March last year, of Mr. Charles Frederick Hyde, organist and choirmaster at Giggleswiok School, a desire was manifested by his former friends and pupils to commemorate his work and character by some lasting and worthy memorial It was decided, therefore, to present to the school an organ, to be erected in the large school, and on Wednesday, in the presence of a considerable number of subscribers and friends, the new organ was formally presented to the school by the Head Master, as Chairman of the Memorial Committee, and accepted by the Chairman on behalf of the Governors The new instrument was then opened by the Rev. H. W. Carpenter, Minor Canon of Salisbury. The subscriptions amounted to more than £550, and the building of the organ was intrusted to Mr. J. J. Binns, of Bramley. The funds were almost entirely subscribed by Mr. Hyde's personal friends and former pupils. Mr. Hyde was the first member of the staff of masters Giggleswiok School whose whole attention was directed to music. For this work he was well qualified by his education under Sir Frederick Ouseley, at St. Michael's College. His success at Giggleswick during seven years work can be partly estimated by the enthusiastic support given by his old pupils to the memorial fund.

Lancaster Guardian
Saturday 19 May 1894
(www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk)
Richard Hygons
c1435 - 1509
Richard Hygons studied under (Succentor of Wells)
Died 1509.
Composer of Church Music, A "Salva Regina" by him is to be found in the Eton College MS.
The Dean and Chapter awarded him, "for his diligent labour and good service to the honour of God and St. Andrew, 26s. 8d. annually in augmentation of his annual pension from the proceeds of a vacant stall, for the term of his life."


Organist of
1487? - 1507

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Charles Henry Hylton-Stewart
20th May 1849 - 7th Apr 1922
Charles Henry Hylton-Stewart was a choral Scholar of St. Catherine's College, Cambridge, 1873.
Afterwards took Holy Orders and became Curate of Pebmarsh, Essex, 1875; Precentor of Chester Cathedral, 1877; Vicar of New Brighton (Cheshire), 1889; and Rector of Bathwick, 1904- 1916. Hon. Canon of Chester, 1916.

Organist of
1874 - 1875

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Logo, Newspaper article NEW CATHEDRAL ORGANIST.
Recital for Choir Music Library.
Mr. C. Hylton-Stewart, the newly appointed organist of Chester Cathedral, gave music in Chester a considerable Sillip on Thursday evening with the first of three weekly recitals.
It cannot be denied that music lies stagnant in our midst, and it lies with Mr. Hylton-Stewart as leader of the art In the city, to bring about a change for the better. He has already started upon this good work, for those of us who delight in good music received our fill at the Cathedral on Thursday. Mr. Hylton Stewart chose a Programme of out-standing merit, a programme which pampered popular taste not one whit, and we exalt in the fact that despite this. those pre sent enjoyed it.

Cheshire Observer
Saturday 13 September 1930
(www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk)
Charles Hylton-Stewart
21st Mar 1884 – 14th Nov 1932
Charles Hylton-Stewart was the son of the Rev. C. Hylton-Stewart (a former Organist of Chichester Cathedral, and afterwards Precentor of Chester Cathedral).
Born at Chester, March 22, 1884.
Pupil of Dr. J. C. Bridge, at Chester.
Stewart of Rannoch Scholar in Sacred Music. Cambridge.
Organ Scholar of Peterhouse, Cambridge, 1903.
Assistant-Organist of Kings College, Cambridge, 1906.
Music Master of Sedburgh School, 1907.
Conductor of Rochester Choral Society, 1918.
Composer of Church Music, Etc.
Died 14 November 1932
Organist of
Sedburgh School, 1907
St. Martin's, Scarborough, 1908;
Blackburn Parish Church, 1914;
1916 -

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Logo, Newspaper article The Late Mr. Hylton Stewart
The untimely death of Mr. Charles Hylton Stewart, who became organist of St. George's Chapel, Windsor, only two months ago, comes as a great blow to a wide circle of lovers of church music, says a London Gossip writer.
His loss will be keenly felt by the Windsor Chapter, for he had already given ample proof that, selecting him to succeed Sir Walford Davies, an ideal choice had been made.
During his fourteen years at Rochester, and afterwards at Chester, where his father was at one time precentor, Hylton Stewart fulfilled every qualification of the cathedral organist. His patience, tact, and singular charm manner won him the instant affection and co-operation of the choir. He was, above all, a devout Churchman, and his reverent and dignified interpretation of the service made lasting impression upon all who heard his accompaniments.

Bath Chronicle and Weekly Gazette
Saturday 19 November 1932
(www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk)
Frederick Iliffe
21st Feb 1847 - 2nd Feb 1928
Frederick Iliffe was born at Smeeton-Westerby, Leicestershire, February 21, 1847.
Conductor of the Queen's College (Eglesfield) Musical Society, 1883.
Composer of an Oratorio. "The Visions of St. John the Divine," Cantatas, Church Music, Orchestral Music, Organ pieces, Pianoforte pieces, Etc.
Author of a critical analysis of Bach's
"Das Wohltemperirte Clavier" The Well-Tempered Clavier
Bach's forty-eight preludes and fugues analysed for students
(Novello &Co., 1896).

Died: February 2, 1928.

Organist of
St. Wilfred's, Kibworth
St. Barnabas', Oxford
1883
Frederick Iliffe Frederick Iliffe
Frederick Iliffe

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1873
Mus. Bac, Frederick Iliffe, New Coll. Mus. Doc., 1879.
Extract; A short historical account of the degrees in music at Oxford
Richard Ingham
1804 - 22nd Jun 1841
Richard Ingham was born 1804.
Composer of Vocal Music, Etc.
Organist of
St. Mary's, Gateshead
1833 - 1841

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William Inglott
William Inglott was born 1554.
First a "Singing-child" in Norwich Cathedral, then "Singing man."
In 7579 he was appointed 'Master over the Singing-Children' in succession to his father.
His name first occurs in Norwich Cathedral records as Organist in 1608.
Died 1621. Buried in Norwich Cathedral Nave.
Composer of pieces for Virginals, Etcc. Two pieces by him, "A Galliard Ground" and "The Leaves bee greene." are included in the Fitzwilliam Virginal Book.
Organist of

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Logo, Newspaper article His monument, on the southern pillar of the Organ screen, was repaired at the expense of Dr. Croft, and bears the following inscription :-

Here William Inglott, Organist, doth rest,
Whose art in Music this Cathedral blest;
For Descant most. for Voluntary all,
He passed on Organ, Song. and Virginal.
He left this life at age of sixty-seven,
And now 'mongst Angels all sings first in Heaven
His Fame flies Jar, his Name shall never die,
See, Art and Age here crown his memorie.
Non digitis, !Inglotti, tuis terrestia tangis;
Tangis nunc digitis Organa celsa poll.
Anno Dam. 1621.

Buried the last day of December 1621
This erected on the 15th of June 1662

Ne forma hujusce monumenti injuria
Temporum penè deleti, dispereat, exculpi
Curavit Gul. Croft Reg. Capellac in
Arte Musicâ Discipul. præfectus.

Dr. Croft evidently held this musician in high estimation.
William Jamson Ions
3rd Nov 1833 - 30th Mar 1906
William Jamson Ions was born at Newcastle-on-Tyne, November 3, 1833.
Chorister in St. Nicholas' Church.
Pupil of his brother, Thomas Ions, the then Organist of St. Nicholas', and Assistant-Organist to him in 1850.
Studied in Germany, 1852 - 1854. Returning to England, he was appointed Organist at St. Nicholas' on the death of his brother.
Organised several Choral Festivals (with orchestra) at St. Nicholas' and elsewhere.
Designed the new organ in St. Nicholas', which was opened in 1891.
Presented with a testimonial, 1893.
Retired 1894 upon becoming afflicted with deafness.
Died March 30, 1906.
Composer of Church Music.
Organist of
(St. Nicholas) 1857 - 1894

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Herbert Stephen Irons
19th Jan 1834 - 29th Jun 1905
Herbert Stephen Irons was born at Canterbury, January 19, 1834, and Chorister in the Cathedral there, of which his father was a Lay Vicar.
Pupil of Dr. Stephen Elvey at Oxford.
Precentor of St. Columba's College.
Assistant-Organist of Chester Cathedral, 1873.
Composer of Church Music, Organ pieces, Etc.
His Tunes "Columba" ("The sun is sinking fast") and "Southwell" ("Jerusalem. my happy home") are well-known to most choirs and congregations.
Organist of
1856
1857 - 1872
St. Andrew's,Web site.
Picture of memorial plaque
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Nottingham, 1876

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Logo, Newspaper article Mr. H. S. IRONS, OF NOTTINGHAM
Mr. Herbert Stephen Irons, of 10, Villa-road, Nottingham, professor of music. and well known as the organist St. Andrew's Church, who died on the 29th June last, aged 71, left estate valued at £1,699 12s. gross, and £1,664 Is. 7d. net, and probate of his will has been granted to his widow Mrs. Lucy Irons, 10, Villa-road.

Nottingham Journal
Thursday 10 August 1905
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Elias Isaac
Elias Isaac was born 1725.
Pupil of Dr. Greene.
Conductor for some years of the Worcester Festivals.
Died July 14, 1793. Buried in the North Cloister of Worcester Cathedral. At his funeral the choir sang as an Anthem, Greene's "Lord, let me know mine end."
Composer of a Cantata, "The Blackbirds." There is an Anthem by him in the Books of Durham Cathedral.
Mentioned in "A Collection of Anthems" by John Calvert.

Organist of
1747 - 1793

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Peter Isaac(ke)
- 1694
Peter Isaac was a native of England.
Appointed a Vicar Choral of St. Patrick's, Dublin, 1673; but deprived of that office for neglect of duty, 1688, when he returned to England, and became Organist of Salisbury Cathedral. In 1691 he was invited by the Dean and Chapter of Christ Church Cathedral, Dublin, to "come over" and serve as Vicar Choral and Organist of that Cathedral, which post he accepted, and was admitted, 1692, "on account of his extraordinary skill in music."
Died 1694.
Organist of
1673 - 1688
1688 - 1692
1692 - 1694

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William Isaac
Believed to be a relative of Peter Isaac.
Organist of
1691 - 1692

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John Jackson
- 1688
John Jackson was admitted Organist and Vicar at Wells Cathedral, his payment being £50 "for this year only." He was previously "Instructor in Music to the Choristers" at Ely Cathedral.
An Anthem by him, "The Lord said unto my Lord," is included in the Tudway Collection, one in the Ely Collection, and two are to be found in Playford's "Cantica Sacra." There is also a Service in C in MS. at Wells, and Organ parts to eight Anthems, Etc., in a MS. in the Library of the Royal College of Music.
Organist of
1674 - 1688

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William Jackson
29th May 1730 - 5th Jul 1803
William Jackson was the son of a grocer in Exeter. Born May 29, 1730.
Pupil of John Silvester and afterwards of John Travers in London. Returned to Exeter and established himself as a teacher.
Died July 5, 1803. Buried in the Vestry of St. Stephen's Church, Exeter.
Inscription on the white marble monument to Wm. Jackson, in the Vestry of St. Stephen's Church, Exeter:—
"In the Science of Music an eminent Professor, whose genius united elegant expression with pure and original melody and delicacy of harmonic combination. In painting, in literature, in every liberal study that enlightens the intellect) or expands the heart, his attainments were rare and distinguished: a writer, novel and acute in observation, a correct and discriminating critic: endeared to his select associates by a conversation and demeanour of impressive and fascinating simplicity. Born in this city xxix May, 1730. Died v July. 1803"

Composer of Operas, Odes, Songs, Sonatas, and a quantity of Church Music, including the once popular Service in F.
Writer on musical and other subjects; also skilled as a painter. the great artist, was one of his intimate friends,
Organist of
1777 - 1803
William Jackson William Jackson
William Jackson

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Logo, Newspaper article EXETER ORGANIST AND HANDEL.
William Jackson, organist of Exeter Cathedral in the I8th century, could not appreciate the music of Haydn, Mozart, and Handel.
He was born at Exeter in May, 1730, and began his musical studies at twelve years of age, becoming a chorister in the Cathedral.
Apparently Jackson was actually taught very little at this time in organ playing, but by constant practice he mastered Handel's organ concertos and some of Correlli's sonatas.
After training in London he returned to Exeter, where he settled down as a music teacher and composer, and in 1777 became Cathedral organist.
He was highly indignant that the public should appreciate the music of Haydn, Mozart, and Handel, and gave vent to his feelings in a publication in 1791. He appears to have been highly annoyed by the great Handel Commemoration in Westminster Abbey in 1784.
He died of asthma in 1803, and was buried in St. Stephen's Church, Exeter, where there is a tablet to his memory.

Western Morning News
Wednesday 23 December 1931
(www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk)
Robert Janes
1806 - 1866
Robert Janes was born, 1805.
"Sol-fa Scholar" (i.e., Chorister) in Dulwich College.
Pupil of Dr. Z. Buck at Norwich.
Appointed Organist of Ely Cathedral at the age of eighteen. Died at Ely, 1866.
Composer of the well-known "Ely Confession" and other Church Music.
Editor of a Psalter, which was in use for many years at Ely.
Janes had a very large teaching connection in Norfolk and Suffolk, and in later years was wont to relate how he rode long distances on horseback to fulfil his engagements; also how he had arranged a pair of lamps, attached to his saddle like pistol holsters, to light his lonely road at night through the Fen country. It is said that his income at this time could not have been expressed in less than four numerals. (See "Fifty Years of Church Music," by the Rev. W. E. Dickson, M.A.)
He possessed some ability as an amateur printer, and several part-books, set up and printed at his own press, were in use at Ely until 1866.
Organist of
1831 - 1866

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John Edward Jeffries
18th Oct 1863 - 11th May 1918
John Edward Jeffries was born at Walsall, October 18, 1863.
Chorister, and afterwards Assistant- Organist at St. Paul's, Walsall, under his father.
Student at the Royal College of Music, under Dr. (afterwards Sir George) Martin, Dr. (now Sir F.) Bridge, Dr. Gladstone, and Mr. Franklin Taylor. Appointed Organist of Walsall Parish Church, 1881, where he frequently introduced Oratorio Services with orchestral accompaniment.
Conductor of Jarrow Philharmonic Society and Newcastle Amateur Vocal Society.
Died at Walsall, May 11, 1918.
Composer of an Oratorio and other Church Music, Songs, Etc.

Organist of
Walsall Parish Church, 1881,
1895 - 1918

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Stephen Jefferies (snr)
1662 - 1712
Stephen Jefferies was born 1662.
Chorister in Salisbury Cathedral and afterwards Assistant Organist there.
Appointed Organist of Gloucester Cathedral at the age of twenty.
Composer of one of the melodies played by the Gloucester Cathedral chimes.
A set of Variations on this melody has been written for the pianoforte together with pieces upon the other chime melodies by an Organist of Gloucester Cathedral, Mr. C. Lee Williams, Mus.B., and published by Messrs Novello.

Died 1712.
Buried in the Cathedral Cloisters.

From the records
31st Janry, 1684. Jefferies' first monition' for manifold neglect and unreasonable absence from the Church without leave desired or obtained.
8th Feby, 1688. Jefferies' second monition for playing over upon the organ a common ballad, "insomuch that the young gentlewomen invited one another to dance."
"8th Feby, 1688. Mr. Subdean pronounced against Mr. Stephen Jefferies, Organist of this Church, his second monition to depart this Church, for that he, the said Stephen Jefferies, did upon Thursday last in the morning (being the Thanksgiving day), immediately after the sermon ended and the Blessing given, play over upon the organ a common ballad in the hearing of 1500 or 2000 people, to the great scandal of religion, prophanation of the Church, and grievous offence of all good Christians. And further, because though Dr. Gregory (the Senior Prebendary of this Church) did immediately express his great detestation of the same to Mr. Deighton, the Chaunter of this Church, and Mr. John Tyler, the senior singingman of the Choir, informing them of the unspeakable scandal that universally was taken at it, and that they immediately acquainted the said Stephen Jefferies therewith, yet he, the said Stephen Jefferies, in direct despite to religion, and affront to the said Dr. Gregory, did after evening prayer, as soon as the last Amen was ended, in the presence and hearing of all the congregation, fall upon the same strain, and on the organ played over the same common ballad again; insomuch that the young gentlewomen invited one another to dance, the strangers cryed it were better that the organs were pulled down than they should be so used, and all sorts declared that the Dean and Chapter could never remove the scandal if they did not immediately turn away so insolent and profane a person out of the Church."

5th Decr, 1699. Jefferies' first admonition for frequent absences, especially on Sunday mornings; but more particularly for not educating the Choristers in the grounds of music.
According to ("History of Music," p.770), there was a story concerning Jeffries amongst the Choirmen of Gloucester, who used to relate that "To cure him of a habit of staying late at the tavern, his wife drest up a fellow in a winding-sheet, with directions to meet him with a lanthorn and candle in the cloisters through which he was to pass on his way home; but that, on attempting to terrify him, Jeffries expressed his wonder only by saying 'I thought all you spirits had been abed before this time'."
Hawkins also gives the following story as a proof of Jeffries's eccentric character:- A singer from a distant church, with a good voice, had been requested and undertook to sing a solo anthem in Gloucester Cathedral, and for that purpose took his station at the elbow of the organist in the organ loft. Jeffries, who found him trip in the performance, instead of palliating his mistake and setting him right, immediately rose from his seat, and leaning over the gallery, called out aloud to the choir and the whole congregation-"He can't sing it!"

Organist of
1682 - 1710

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Logo, Newspaper article THE THREE CHOIRS’ FESTIVAL.
The history the "Three Choirs Festival" is well known. As far as can be ascertained, the meetings were established at Gloucester some time prior to the year 1723, their purpose being to promote intercourse between the members of the choirs of the three Cathedrals, there being no idea in these early days of assisting any charitable object.

Gloucestershire Chronicle
Saturday 15 September 1906
(www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk)
Stephen Jefferies (jnr)
Stephen Jefferies (jnr) was the son of Stephen Jefferies, Organist of Gloucester Cathedral.
Educated at King's School, Gloucester.
Lay Clerk of Gloucester Cathedral, 1696. Admonished there in 1697 for the neglect of his service in the Quire and his often repair to the Organ loft, and that for the future he refrain so to do without notice first given to Mr. Chanter.
Resigned his appointment at Gloucester in 1700.
Organist of
1701 - 1710

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Charles Sherwood Jekyll
Charles Sherwood Jekyll was born at Westminster, November 29, 1842.
Chorister in Westminster Abbey.
Pupil of and
Assistant-Organist of Westminster Abbey, 1860-1875.
Composer to the Chapel Royal, 1876.
Retired 1891:
Died in London, November 7, 1914.
Composer of Church Music, Part-songs, Songs, Organ pieces, Pianoforte pieces, Etc.
Organist of
St. Paul's, Kensington, 1857;
Acton Parish Church, 1860;
St. George's, Hanover Square 1861;
1876 - 1891

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Randolph Jewitt
1603- 3rd Jul 1675
Randolph (Randall) Jewitt was the son of Randall Jewitt, a Gentleman of the Chapel Royal, and one of a distinguished family of Chester citizens.
Chorister in Chester Cathedral. Pupil of Dr. Orlando Gibbons.
Organist of Christ Church and St. Patrick's Cathedrals, Dublin, 1631. Returned to England for a short time and became Organist of Chester Cathedral, 1643. After the siege of Chester he again went to Ireland, and became Vicar Choral of Christ Church and St. Patrick's Cathedrals, Dublin. Returning a second time to England, he was appointed Almoner of St. Paul's Cathedral, 1660, and Minor Canon and Junior Cardinal there, 1661. Organist of Winchester Cathedral, 1666.
Died July 3, 1675. Buried in the North Transept of Winchester Cathedral.
Composer of Church Music.
Organist of
1631
1631
1643
1666

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Basil Johnson
5th Apr 1861 - 1950
Arthur Basil Noel Johnson was born at Oxford, 1861.
The son of the Very' Rev. G. H. S. Johnson, Dean of Wells.
Educated at Malvern College and Magdalen College, Oxford: Organist of the former, Academical Clerk of the latter.
Student of the Royal College of Music.
Musical Director at Rugby School, 1886. (Reginald Foort was one of his pupils)
Conductor of the Rugby Philharmonic Society for twenty-seven years.
Examiner for the Associated Board of R.A.M. and R.C.M.
Precentor of Eton College. 1914.
Organist of
St. James's, Norlands;
St. Gabriel's, Pimlico;
Rugby School, 1886;
1914 - 1926

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Logo, Newspaper article FORMER RUGBY SCHOOL ORGANIST DEAD
Dr. Arthur Basil Noel Johnson, former organist and music master Rugby School and later precentor and organist at Eton, died at his home at Wells, Somerset. He was 89.

Northampton Mercury
Friday 15 December 1950
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John Jones
1767-1820
John Jones was born 1767.
Pupil of Dr. Arnold.
Vicar Choral of Armagh Cathedral, 1796;
Died 1820.
Organist of
Armagh Cathedral 1797 - 1816

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John Jones
1728 - 17th Feb 1796
John Jones was born 1728
Vicar Choral of St. Paul's.
He held the three appointments — Temple, Charter-house, and St. Paul's — until his death, February 17, 1796. Buried in the Charterhouse Chapel Cloisters.
Composer of "60 Chants, Single and Double, respectfully dedicated to the Dean and Chapter of St. Paul's,"
Lessons for the Harpsichord, Songs, Etc.
There are two MS. Services by him in the St. Paul's books. His well-known Double Chant in D was admired by Haydn, who heard it at a Festival of the Charity Children in St. Paul's, 1791, and noted it, in an improved form, in his Diary.

"Jones . . . appears not to have been worthy of the situation, for he was not capable of doing the duty for a length of time after the appointment: and as he could not play from score, he employed himself in arranging the Anthems in two lines. The same book is now in use at the Cathedral. (From "A description of the Organ at St. Paul's Cathedral," in The English Musical Gazette, January 1, 1819.)
Organist of
1749
Charterhouse 1753
1755 - 1796

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Jones Thomas
Jones Thomas was a Chorister at Chester Cathedral
A document referring to the lease of a farm and tenements (&c.), quoted in the "Cheshire Sheaf," February 11, 1891, commences thus:— "This Indenture made the 7 Feb. 1625 between William Trafford, of Bridge Trafford, co. Chester, gent., on the one part, and Thomas Johnes, of the city of Chester, Bachelor of Music, and Anne Johnes, now wife of the same Thomas Jobnes on the other part (&c., &c,)."
The locale of his degree cannot be ascertained.
Organist of
1614 - 1637

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Thomas Evance Jones
1805 - 1872
Thomas Evance Jones was born 1805.
Chorister in Canterbury Cathedral. Pupil of Skeats. Lay Clerk of Canterbury Cathedral, 1822;
Master of the Choristers, Canterbury Cathedral, 1830.
Succeeded Skeats as Organist, 1831.
Died at Canterbury, 1872. Buried in St. Martin's Churchyard.
Composer of Church Music. Only one Anthem by him was published— "Unto Him that loved us."
Organist of
1831 - 1872

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Logo, Newspaper article Thomas Evance Jones
The next to join the Cathedral choir as a Lay Clerk was Thomas Evance Jones, who has already been mentioned(1) as having been required to dance on the organ pedals by an irascible Highmore Skeats.
His career at the Cathedral, first as Chorister 1813-1819, Lay Clerk from 1821, Assistant Organist in 1824, Master of the Choristers in 1830, and then Organist when he succeeded Skeats in 1831, is prescient of the career of William Henry Longhurst who was yet to join the choir in 1826-according to legend, the young William Henry was enthusiastically crawling in and around the cathedral organ pipes as his father fixed and tuned it.
Jones serves as a reminder that the Organist was not originally a separate appointment, but was drawn from the ranks of the Lay Clerks; only in 1845, during Jones' tenure, did the Dean and Chapter resolve "that the Organist be no longer a Lay Clerk also but that no diminution be made of the payments made to him." It cannot have helped the standards of cathedral music in this period that the choir had been thus diminished when one of their number went into the organ loft to accompany and that, in any case, it had no conductor.

(1)Mr Skeats, however high his other qualifications, could scarcely be termed an adept as an executant. He was very much averse to improvements of any kind, and when, in 1825-6, Mr Longhurst the elder added to the old organ a set of pedals (the first seen or heard, Dr Longhurst believes, in Kent) he was much annoyed, and persistently refused to touch them. When any strangers were desirous of hearing their effect, Mr Skeats would call his young pupil, and say, "Here, Jones, you come and show off these things; I never learned to dance!"

The Canterbury Catch Club 1826: Music in the Frame
Haydn Keeton
26thOct 1847 - 27th May 1921
Haydn Keeton was born at Mosborough, Derbyshire, October 26th, 1847. Chorister in St. George's Chapel, Windsor. Pupil of Sir George Elvey. Organist of Datchet Parish Church, 1867, and afterwards at Hawtrey's School at Slough, which he resigned on his appointment to Peterborough Cathedral.
Conductor of Peterborough Choral and Orchestral Societies. Conductor and Organist of Peterborough and Lincoln Festivals.
Composer of Church Music, a Symphony for orchestra, Pianoforte pieces, Part-Songs, Songs, Etc.
Author of "Church and Cathedral Choristers' Singing Method. "
On March 24th 1920, Dr. Keeton completed the fiftieth year of his Organistship at Peterborough Cathedral. During this long period he had effected many improvements in the Cathedral Services there. The four-manual Organ, by Messrs. W. Hill & Son, was built under his direction, and opened in 1894.
Died May 27th 1921.

Organist of
St. John's Church, Peterborough.
Trinity College, Glenalmond
St. Alban's Church, Birmingham
1870 - 1921
Haydn Keeton
Haydn Keeton

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Logo, Newspaper article WILL
He bequeathed his full scores of works by Mendelssohn, Mozart, Beethoven, Schubert, Spohr, Weber and Gounod to his nephews A. C. Keeton and H. K. Hardwick. £100 a year and the household effects to his wife; and the residue in trust for his wife and daughter

Nottingham Journal
Tuesday 30 August 1921
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Thomas Kelway
- 21st May 1749
Thomas Kelway was born at Chichester.
Chorister in the Cathedral, and probably a pupil of Reading, whom he succeeded as Organist.
Died at Chichester, May 21, 1749. Buried in the South Aisle of the Cathedral.
Keiway's gravestone, having been lost sight of for many years, was found and replaced, and the inscription re-cut, about 1846. This circumstance gave rise to the following pleasing sonnet by Mr. Charles Crocker, a former well-known Verger of Chichester Cathedral:-
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LINES PROM CROCKER

Charles Crocker was a Chichester shoemaker who composed poems while at work at his last, and published book them in 1860.


Thomas Kelway
In the south aisle of Chichester Cathedral lies the grave-stone of Thomas Kelway, who in his day enjoyed considerable celebrity as a composer of sacred music. The inscription is as follow:-

In memory of Thomas Kelway, Organist of this Cathedral 23 years, who died May ye 21st, 1749.
My hope is in my Saviour, Jesus Christ.

Kelway! thy memory, fresh Morn of May, In many a heart's most secret, holiest cell. Where love of Sacred Song delights to dwell, Lives—and shall live while Music holds her sway within these hallowed walls, where, day by day year after year, he plied his wondrous art. Which bids the spirit from its prison start. And soar awhile to happier realms away. His strains full oft still fall upon the ear Of those who tread yon aisle; while at their feet His name, and record of his hope appear. Peace to his ashes—be his slumbers sweet. Till that glad morn when he shall wake to hear The angelic choir in nightless Heavens's bright sphere.

Chichester Observer - Wednesday 25 October 1911
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Seven Services and nine Anthems in his own handwriting are in Chichester Cathedral Library. His Evening Services in B minor, A minor, and G minor are still in frequent use. His brother, Joseph Keiway, was one of the most celebrated organists of his time.
Organist of
1733 - 1747

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Joseph Kemp
1778 - 1824
Joseph Kemp was born at Exeter, 1778.
Pupil of William Jackson.
In 1803 he was presented by the Dean and Chapter of Bristol Cathedral with a Gold Medal "for his unremitting attention to the improvement of the Choir of this Church."
Removed to London and became a teacher there.
Died in London, 1824.
Composer of an Oratorio, "The Crucifixion," Church Music, "Twenty Double Chants," Cantatas, Glees, Etc.
Organist of
1802 - 1807

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Thomas Kempton
Thomas Kempton was born 1694.
Died June 16, 1762.
Buried in St. Mary's Churchyard, Ely,
Composer of the well-known Service, Kempton in B flat, the autograph score of which, together with those of four other Services and three Anthems, is included in the Cathedral MSS.
Organist of
1729 - 1762

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Logo, Newspaper article MR. KEMPTON
ORGANIST OF St. MARK’S, DUNDELA
(For many years Deputy Organist of Ely Cathedral, and Professor of Singing and Theory the Lichfield Training College),
BEGS to announce that, for the convenience of Town Pupils, he will continue his Pianoforte, Singing, and Theory Lessons at 90 Donegall Street.

Belfast Telegraph - Saturday 30 August 1879
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William Kenge
William Kenge was conductor of the Worcester Three Choirs Festivals in 1809 and 1813.
Organist of
1807 - 1813

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Logo, Newspaper article BY Order of the Court for the Relief of Insolvent Debtors.
The Petition WILLIAM KENGE, late of Ross, Herefordshire, Professor of Music, but now a Prisoner for Debt, confined in His Majesty's Gaol of Hereford, the County of Hereford, will heard before His Majesty's Justices of the said County, at an adjournment of the General Quarter Sessions of the Peace which will be holden at the New Shire-Hall, Hereford, in and for the said County, on Saturday the 21st day March, 1818. at the hour of Ten o’clock the morning,

Bristol Mirror - Saturday 28 February 1818
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James Kent
13th Mar 1700 – 6th May 1776
James Kent was the son of a glazier. Born at Winchester, March 13, 1700.
Chorister in Winchester Cathedral, and afterwards in the Chapel Royal.
Resigned Winchester Cathedral and College appointments, 1774.
Died at Winchester, May 6, 1776. Buried in the North Transept of the Cathedral.
Composer of a number of Services and Anthems, Organ pieces, Etc.

"A few years before his death he presented some of his compositions to Trinity College, Cambridge, for which he received the thanks of that body, from the Master, informing him at the same time that the College had voted him a piece of plate, value ten pounds, and desiring to know in what form it should be presented. Mr. Kent chose a tankard."—(From the "Succinct Account"in Arnold's "Cathedral Music")

The following paragraph occurs in Bishop Huntingford's (of Hereford) account of James Kent, written for Joseph Corfe's edition of the second volume of Kent's Anthems, published in 1796. (The autograph of this account was in the possession of the late J. S. Bumpus) :-


"As an Organist he was conscientiously diligent, not only in punctual attendance at times of Choral Prayers, but also in the more laborious and indispensably requisite part of an Organist's duty, the teaching of the boys. His manner of playing was neither indecorously rapid, nor heavily slow but such as became the sanctity of the Church and the solemnity of the Service. He was reputed to be one of the best players of Dr. Croft's music in the kingdom."

Organist of
Finedon Parish Church, 1717;
1731 1737
1737 1774
1737 1774

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Logo, Newspaper article JAMES KENT (1700—1776)
James Kent became organist Trinity College, Cambridge, in 1731, and six years later removed to Winchester Cathedral. said to have been largely copyist; much of the famous Hear prayer is said fco hare been borrowed from work Charles Stroud on the same theme. Be that as it may, I shall never forget the beauty of the duet it, as rendered by two boys in King's College, Cambridge. Kent had excellent choice of suitable words, which he wedded to tuneful and moving music.

Todmorden & District News
Friday 06 February 1920
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William Key
William Key
Organist of
1670 - 1679
1680 - 1686
George King was the father of William King(below)
Dies 1665. Buried in the Cloisters of Winchester College.
Organist of
1645 - 1665

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William King
1642 - 17th Nov 1680
William King was the son of George King (Organist of Winchester College).
Clerk of Magdalen College, 1648-1652.
Chaplain of Magdalen College, 1652-1654.
Died November 17, 1680. Buried in New College Cloisters.
Composer of a complete Service in B fiat, containing a setting of the Litany still sung at Lichfield Cathedral. It was published by John Bishop, of Cheltenham, half-a-century ago. Composer also of Anthems, Songs, Etc. Inscription on his gravestone: "Hoc sub lapide obdormiscit quicquid mortale reliquum est Gulielmi King, istius Collegii nuperrime Organistæ, cujus in Musicâ singularis eminentia ipsum angelorum consortii participem fecit die mensis Nov. 27, 1680, ætat 57."
Google translated as
This stone obdormiscit whatever the mortal remains of William King's College recently organist whose music very high degree of individual participant has the company on Oct. 27, 1680, age 57

Organist of
1663 - 1680

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Thomas Kingston
On the 3oth of March, 1611, Thomas Kingston was arraigned before Lincoln Cathedral Chapter "for beating the boys and calling Mr. Dye, the Master of the Choristers, an ass(!). He confessed all the misdemeanours charged against him, and submitted to the censure of the Chapter. Whereupon they gave him an admonition, and gave him order to amend upon pain of being turned out and deprived."
In 1612, however, he "is ordered never hereafter to meddle with teaching the Quiristers."
In 1615 again admonished: "He ys verye often drunke and by means therof he hathe by unorderlye playing on the organs putt the quire out of time and disordered them."

Organist of
1599 - 1616

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Kirby (Kirkby)
Kirby was buried under the Window of the Clock (Rose window) in York Cathedral
The inscription on his tomb reads:

Hic jacet egiregius cantor Kirkbius in urna,
Organa qui fcite tangeret unus erat. Edidit infignes cantus modulamine dulci.
Hujus erat templi gloria, fplendor, honor.
Magna hujus fuerat probitas, sapientia, virtus,
Confilio enituit, moribus, ingenio.

Translation: "Here lie the ashes of Kirby, an excellent Chanter and incomparable Organist. He sang extraordinary songs to charming tunes. He was the boast, glory, and honour of this Church. Great were his probity, wisdom, and virtue; and his understanding, morality, and genius remarkable."

Organist of
- 1633

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Charles Herbert Kitson
13th Nov 1874 – 13th May 1944
Charles Herbert Kitson was born at Leyburn, Yorks, 1874
Assistant Music Master at Haileybury College, 1897.
Music Master at St. Edmunds School, Canterbury, 1899.
Professor of Music at University College, Dublin, 1915. Resigned the appointment in Dublin and became resident in London.
Professor of Music at Dublin University, 1920.
Author of several musical text-books.
Composer of Church Music, Organ pieces, Etc.
Joint editor (with Dr. C. G. Marchant) of the revised edition of the
Irish Church Hymnal. Web site giving locations where this work can be viewed

Organist of
St. John the Baptist, Leicester, 1902;
1913 - 1920
Charles Herbert Kitson Charles Herbert Kitson
Charles Herbert Kitson

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Article icon KITSON, Dr. Charles Herbert (1874-1944)

Born in Leyburn, Yorkshire on 13 September 1874; died in Kensington, London on 13 May 1944.
Educated at Ripon School. Organ scholar (1894-1897) at Selwyn College, Cambridge, where he read divinity, winning a prize and graduating B.A. (1896) and MA. (1903). Also graduated B.Mus. (1897) and D. Mus. (1902) at St. Edmund Hall, Oxford.
Assistant music master of Haileybury School (1897-1898) and St. Edmund's School, Canterbury, Kent (1898-1901).
Organist of the Church of St. John the Baptist, Leicester (1901-1913). Held four major musical appointments in Dublin. Organist of Christ Church Cathedral (1913-1920); senior theory professor at the Royal Irish Academy of Music (1918-1920). A professor of music at University College (1915-1920) and, later, Trinity College (1920-1935). Witnessed and later wrote an account of the Irish Rebellion of 1916.

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Thomas Night
1789 - 21st Nov 1811
Thomas Night
Organist of
1808 - 1811

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Charles William Lavington
Feb 1819 - 27th Oct 1895
Charles William Lavington was born February, 1819 at Wells.
Chorister at Wells Cathedral.
Pupil of William Perkins, and afterwards of James Turk at Westminster Abbey.
Assistants Organist of Wells Cathedral, and, in 1842, Acting-Organist.
Appointed to the full office on the death of William Perkins; also Organist of the Theological College.
Died at Wells, October 27, 1895.
Buried in the Cloister Churchyard at Wells Cathedral.
Composer of Anthems Chants, Etc. (
Andante in F)Paul Winter
Hereford Cathedral organ (Hauptwerk)

Organist of
1860 - 1895

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Edwin Henry Lemare
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Organist of
Charles Harford Lloyd
16th Oct 1849 - 16th Oct 1919
Charles Harford Lloyd was born at Thornbury, Gloucester, October 16, 1849.
Graduated in Arts and Music at Magdalen Hall, Oxford.
Conductor of the Gloucester Festivals, 1877 and 1880.
Resigned the post at Gloucester on his appointment as Organist of Christ Church Cathedral, Oxford, 1882.
First President of Oxford University Musical Club.
Succeeded Sir Joseph Barnby as Organist and Precentor of Eton College, 1892.
President of the Royal College of Organists, 1902-1903.
Retired from the appointment at Eton College, 1914.
Organist and Composer to the Chapel Royal, 1916.
Died October 16, 1919.
Composer of Cantatas, Church Music, Organ pieces, Madrigals, Part-songs, Songs, Etc.
Editor, with Sir George Martin and others, of The New Cathedral Psalter, also of the New Cathedral Psalter Chant Book (Parish Choir Edition).
Organist of
1876 - 1882
1882 - 1892
1892 - 1914
1916 - 1919
Charles Harford Lloyd
Charles Harford Lloyd

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Logo, Newspaper article Dr. C. Harford Lloyd's Memorial.
I am informed that the donations to the Memorial to Dr. Charles Harford Lloyd, M..A., Mus.Doc., organist of Gloucester Cathedral from 1876 to 1882 amount to £401, and after defraying the cost of the window- £94-there is a balance of £311, which will, be invested by trustees to found the Lloyd Musical Scholarship for old Gloucester Cathedral Choristers who intend adopting music as a profession.
The window, which has been placed in his Lady Chapel of the Cathedral, faces that of Dr. Lloyd's predecessor. Dr. S. S. Wesley. There are two lights; above, the figure of St. Gregory teaching a choir, and in the background s lectern with a book of Gregorian music open upon it. In the lower light the central figure is Jubal, father of ' all such as handle the harp and the organ." The figure of Jubal himself is adapted from one on the base of Giotto's Tower at Florence, where the fathers of all the arts are expressed in sculpture.
The window will be unveiled by Sir Henry Hadow Vice-Chancellor of Sheffield University on Tuesday next, at 3 p.m., when all subscribers to the Fund are invited to be present.
With regard to the balance of £300 odd to be invested to found a Lloyd Memorial Scholarship, Dr. Brewer is anxious by this means to found a school for Church musicians, and it is. hoped that many more such scholarships will eventually be added. There is no better nursery than a Cathedral Choir to shape the mind of young musicians. Dr. Brewers idea for the foundation of such a school is quite a new one in connection with Cathedral life in this. country.
The music for the Unveiling Service on Tuesday is all by Charles Harford Lloyd, and an address on Music will be given by Sir Henry Hadow.

Gloucestershire Chronicle
Saturday 04 February 1922
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Edward Lowe
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Organist of