4 Classical Organists pre 1900 M to P
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Directory of Past Classical Organists


Extract from Cathedral Organists Past and Present
By John E. West
Published in 1921
Additional information from the British Newspaper Archive.

This page is still a work in progress

A - B - C - D - E - F - G - H - I - J - K - L - M - N - O - P - Q - R - S - T - U - V - W   *
Charles Donald Maclean
27th Mar 1843 - 23rd Jun 1916
Charles Donald Maclean was born at Cambridge, March 27, 1843.
A pupil of Ferdinand Biller at Cologne.
Director of the Music at Eton College, 1872. Resigned the post at Eton and was for some years resident in India.
Eventually settled in London.
Died June 23, 1916.
Composer of an Oratorio, "Noah," a Cantata. "Sulmala," a Requiem Mass, Church Music, Orchestral Music, Chamber Music, Songs, Pianoforte pieces. Etc.
Organist of
Exeter College, Oxford, 1862
1872 - 1875

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Logo, Newspaper article ETON. The College.
The office of musical instructor at the College, vacant by Dr. Haynes's resignation, has been filled up by Dr. Hornby, the head master, with the selection Mr. Charles Donald Maclean, M.A., Mus. Doc, of Exeter College, Oxford, and formerly organist of Exeter College and of the Madras Cathedral, and conductor of the Madras Philharmonic Society.
The post of organist, which is in the gift of the college, was also at the same time conferred on Dr. Maclean.

Bucks Herald
Saturday 13 April 1872
(www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk)
Logo, Newspaper article CIVIL SERVICE OF INDIA
The undermentioned candidates, selected in 1964, have passed the "further examination":-
Charles Donald Maclean.    Madras    (Mark = 1242)
Saunders's News-Letter
Tuesday 01 August 1865
(www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk)
Logo, Newspaper article
In a Convocation holden on Friday. at two o'clock, a grace was passed granting permission to Charles Donald Maclean. Bachelor of Music, of Exeter College, to proceed to the degree of doctor in that faculty earlier than permitted by the statuses in order that he may proceed at once to India.

Oxford Times
Saturday 11 November 1865
(www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk)
Logo, Newspaper article MUSICAL NOTES
The career of Dr. Charles Donald Maclean, who died recently, was peculiar, possibly unique, in the fact that he combined music with long period of work in India as an Indian Civil servant.
Born in 1843, he was educated at Shrewsbury and Exeter College, Oxford, of which he was a scholar.
He was organist of his college and took his degree of Doctor of Music at the early age of 22.
For a few years he was organist and music director at Eton, being succeeded by Sir Joseph Barnby.
In India he held appointments chiefly in Madras. Returning to England in 1593, he became general secretary of the International Musical Society, which before the war had its headquarters Leipzig.
Dr. Maclean produced long list of musical compositions.

Western Daily Press
Monday 03 July 1916
(www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk)
Charles Stewart Macpherson
20th May 1870 - 28th May 1927
Charles Stewart Macpherson was born in Edinburgh, May 20, 1870.
Chorister in St. Paul's Cathedral.
Student of the Royal Academy of Music.
Sub-Organist of St. Paul's Cathedral, 1895.
Composer of an Orchestral Overture and two Suites, 137th Psalm for soli, chorus, and orchestra, Church Music, Part-songs, a Fantasy Prelude for the Organ.
Arranger of Scottish Music. Editor of "The New Cathedral Psalter Chant Book" (Village Church Edition).
Lecturer on musical subjects, Etc.
Organist of
St. David's, Weem, Aberfeldy, 1887;
Private Chapel, Luton Hoo, Beds, 1889;
1916 - 1927
Charles Stewart Macpherson Charles Stewart Macpherson
Charles Stewart Macpherson
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Logo, Newspaper article FAMOUS ORGANIST DEAD
LATE DR. MACPHERSON.
Dr Charles Macpherson, the famous organist of St Paul ' s Cathedral, and whose association with the Cathedral covered almost the whole of his life, died in the street on Saturday afternoon. With his wife he had been to the Grosvenor Hotel, near Victoria Station, London, when he was suddenly taken ill, and fell on the pavement. His wife called a taxi-cab, and Dr Macpherson was assisted into this and taken to St George ' s Hospital. On arrival he was found to be dead-it is believed from heart failure.
He had seemed in his usual health and good spirits up to the time of his seizure He was at St Paul's on Thursday and Friday evening, and on Saturday morning he was laughing and chatting with his friends.
NATIVE OF EDINBURGH.
Dr Macpherson, who was born in Edinburgh in 1870, was the son of the late Charles Macpherson, City Architect. He went to St Paul's as a choir boy in 1870, and was educated at the Choir School. Leaving St. Paul's, where he had also been an organ pupil in 1887, he was for about two years organist of St David's, Weem, near Aberfeldy. From 1889 until 1895 he was organist of the private chapel at Luton Hoo, Bedfordshire, the residence of the late Madame de Falbe. In the latter years he was appointed sub-organist at St Paul's, and in 1916 succeeded Sir George Martin as organist.
From 1890 he was, for five years, a student at the Royal Academy of Music, where he took the Charles Lucas Medal for Composition. Dr Macpherson (the degree was conferred by the University of Durham, honoris causa) produced a number of compositions, orchestral, chamber music, choral, and for organ. Among these are an Overture and an Orchestral Suite on Highland themes, which are still in manuscript, the orchestral "Hallowe'en," and the cantata, "By the Waters of Babylon." His "Te Deum" was written for the signing of peace in 1918.
Dr Macpherson's marriage to Miss Newbolt, daughter of Canon Newbolt, had a peculiar interest in that it was the first wedding in St Paul's within living memory, as St Paul's is not licensed for marriages, and special permission and licence had to be obtained. Dr and Mrs Macpherson had one son, who is now at Uppingham School. In the leisure moments of a busy life, the late Dr Macpherson found recreation in sketching and golf.

The Scotsman - Monday 30 May 1927
(www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk)
Arthur Henry Mann
16th May 1850 - 19th Nov 1929
Arthur Henry Mann was born at Norwich, May 16, 1850.
Chorister in Norwich Cathedral, and Assistant-Organist there to Dr. Z. Buck.
Composer of Church Music, Organ Music, Part-songs, Etc.
Editor of Talus's Motet for forty voices, and other music.
One of the Compilers of the Music Catalogue of the Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge.
Musical Editor of Church of England Hymnal, Etc.
Organist of
St. Peter's, Wolverhampton, 1870;
Tettenhall Parish Church, 1871;
Beverley Minster,1875;
1876 - 1929
Cambridge University 1897
Arthur Henry Mann Arthur Henry Mann
Arthur Henry Mann
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Degrees logo1882
Mus. Doc. Arthur Nenry Mann, New Coll.
Extract: A short historical account of the degrees in music at Oxford and Cambridge.
(Williams, C. F. Abdy)

Logo, Newspaper article DR. A. H. MANN.
Fatal Seizures of Famous Cambridge Organist.
Dr. Arthur Henry Mann, University organist and organist of King's College Chapel, died at a Cambridge nursing home yesterday. He was in his eightieth year, and was one of the most distinguished musical figures at Cambridge.
Dr. Mann played at the service at King's College Chapel on Sunday morning, and sung in the world-famous choir, as he was wont to do at unaccompanied services, in the afternoon. On Monday he had two seizures, which proved fatal.
He was a native of Norwich. He secured his Mus.Bac.Oxon in 1875, and followed that with the Mus.Doc.Oxon the following year. In 1870 he became organist at St. Peter's, Wolverhampton, in 1871 of Tettenhall Parish Church, and in 1875 of Beverley Minster. He was organist of King's College Chapel at the early age twenty-six, which post he held until the day of his death. His knowledge of Handel was profound, and he was the composer hymn tunes which have remained prime favourites.
Yorkshire Post and Leeds Intelligencer
Wednesday 20 November 1929
(www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk)
John Marbeck (Merbek)
John Marbeck was born about 1514. Lay Clerk, and afterwards Organist, of St. George's Chapel, Windsor.
Condemned to the stake, for his adherence to the Protestant faith (1544), but escaped through the intervention of Gardiner. Bishop of Winchester.
Died about 1585.
Adapter of the ancient Plain-Song to the English Service, published in 1550 as "The booke of Common Praier Noted." Composer of Church Music, including a Mass "Per arma justitie." Motets, Etc.
Author of a Concordance, "The Lives of the Holy Sainetes, Prophets, Patriachs, and others, contained in Holy Scripture," 1574, Etc.
In the Dedication, to Edward VI., of his "Concordance," he describes himself as "destitute bothe of learnyng and eloquence, yea, and suche a one as in maner never tasted the swetnes of learned Letters, but altogether brought up in your highnes College at Wyndsore in the study of musike and plaiyng on organs, wherin I consumed vainly the greatest part of my life."
According to the "Injunctions newly given by the Kinges Mats Commissioners for the reformation of certain abuses" (4 Edward VI., October 26, 1550)
Organist of
?1541 - ?1585

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1550.
Mus. Doc.-John Marbeck, or Merbecke.
He was famous for his writings against Popery as well as for his music, and while Organist of St. George's Chapel, Windsor, was, about 1514, condemned to the stake, together with Person, a priest, Testwood, a singing man, and Filmer, a tradesman.
Marbeck escaped through the influence of Gardiner, Bishop of Winchester, while the other three were executed. He takes an important place in the history of English Church music, as being the first to set the whole of the Cathedral Service to music, which he published in 1550 under the title of "The booke of Common Praier Noted." Burney gives copious quotations from this work (which is an adaptation of the ancient Plainsong to the English service) in his second volume, page 578, Etc. Hawkins gives a three-part hymn by Marbeck, "A virgine and Mother," † and there are portions of a five-part Mass by him in Burney's "Musical Extracts" in the British Museum. He died about 1585.
Extract: A short historical account of the degrees in music at Oxford and Cambridge.
(Williams, C. F. Abdy)
Charles George Marchant
1857 - 16th Jan 1876
Charles George Marchant was born in Dublin, 1857.
He was a Chorister in St. Patrick's Cathedral.
Choirmaster of St. Patrick's Cathedral.
Conductor of the Dublin University Choral Society.
Professor of the Organ at the Royal Irish Academy of Music, Etc.
Died January 16, 1920.
Composer of a Service in A and other Church Music, Etc.
Joint Editor (with Dr. C. H. Kitson) of the revised edition of the Irish Church Hymnal.
Organist of
Holy Trinity Church, Rathmines;
Christ Church, Bray, 1876;
St. Matthias', Dublin (for one week only)
1879 - 1920
Dublin University

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James Christopher Marks
James Christopher Marks was born at Armagh, in 1835.
Chorister of Armagh Cathedral.
Pupil of R. Turle. Assistant-Organist at Armagh Cathedral, 1852, until his appointment to Cork. Conductor of Cork Harmonic Society, 1860-61, and of Cork Musical Festival in 1862. Conductor of Cork (New) Harmonic Society.
He was a member of St. Patrick’s Senr. Masonic Lodge, No. 623, Armagh until he moved to Cork.
Died suddenly at Clifton, July 17, 1903.
Composer of an Oratorio, "Gideon" (his degree exercise), Church Music, Etc.
Shortly after Dr. Marks's appointment Full Choral Service was re-established in the Cathedral. This had been discontinued since Bishop Wetenhall's time, at the end of the seventeenth century. The present Cathedral was also completed in 1870, and, in commemoration of its consecration, Dr. Marks was publicly invested, by the Dean, with a gold medal.
Organist of

1860 - 1903
James Christopher Marks James Christopher Marks
James Christopher Marks

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Degrees logo1863 Mus. Bac.—James Christopher Marks, Magd. Hall.
Mus. Doc. 1868.
Extract: A short historical account of the degrees in music at Oxford and Cambridge.
(Williams, C. F. Abdy)

Logo, Newspaper article ADDRESS Brother J. C. Marks, P.M., on his removal to Coik from St. Patrick’s Senr. Masonic Lodge, No. C2d, Armagh.
Dear Brother Marks, as you are leaving us, trust for a sphere of more extended usefulness, we unhesitatingly say "God speed."
The world often says laments the loss of a friend how contrary with the Brotherhood. We rejoice in your removal, thereby enabling you, from youth and talent combined, to advance your professional reputation. As we have long fully appreciated your personal merits, and enjoyed the intercourse of Brotherly society that existed between us, with the warmest feelings for the future ptosperity of yourself and partner, daughter of right worthy' Brother, bid you farewell.
Signed, on behalf of Lodge C 23, Armagh, this 12th day of April, 1860


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Thomas Osborne Marks
1845 - 11th Sep 1916
Thomas Osborne Marks was the brother of Dr. J. C. Marks. (above)
Born at Armagh, 1845.
Chorister in Armah Cathedral and afterwards pupil of Robert Turle. and Assistant-Organist. Appointed Organist on Turle's resignation.
Conductor of the Armagh Philharmonic Society.
Died September 11, 1916.
Composer of Church Music, Organ pieces, Part-songs, Songs, Etc.
Organist of
1872 - 1916
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Logo, Newspaper article OBITUARY.
Organist of Armagh Cathedral.
The death occurred in Armagh yesterday of Dr. Thomas Osborne Marks, organist of St. Patrick’s Cathedral.
Dr. Marks was perhaps the best-known organist in Ireland, having for over forty years been organist of the cathedral and connected with the musical life of Ireland.
Previous to his appointment as organist he was assistant organist in the cathedral to the then organist. Dr. Turle, under whom he received his early tuition as a chorister and afterwards as deputy organist.
After his appointment to the important position of organist he graduated and secured his degree. Dr. Marks took the deepest interest in music, not only locally but all over Ireland. On many occasions he acted as adjudicator in important musical contests, and no later than the present yeartook part as one of the adjudicators at the Derry Feis.
He was in his usual health till about Friday last, and attended the. several services held in connection with the cathedral. On that day he was taken ill, the result of which was the necessity of the carrying out internal operation on Monday. which was performed with the utmost skill.
He leaves a widow and a large family, most of whom are in different parts of Ireland and England in responsible positions, and three of his sons volunteered for service during the present war, one them having been killed lately in France.

Northern Whig - Wednesday 13 September 1916
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Arthur Marriot
1854 - 1935
Arthur Marriot was the son of Frederick Marriott, Lay Clerk, St. George's Chapel, Windsor.
Pupil of Sir George Elvey.
Resigned the post at Southwell, 1888, and went to Denver, America.
Organist of
1879 - 1888
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George Marshall
George Marshall was appointed organist of Kings College, Cambridge, on the recommendation of the Earl of Sheffield, as appears from a letter dated September 29, 1626. Soon afterwards, however, he was granted permission to travel abroad, and was furnished with a protection, under the College Charter, against a press for the wars.
Organist of
1626 - 1627
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William Marshall
1806 - 17th Aug 1875
William Marshall was born at Oxford, 1806.
Chorister in the Chapel Royal.
Pupil of Braham, Neate, and Horsley.
Died at Handsworth, August 17, 1875.
Composer of Church Music, Etc.
Editor, with A. Bennett, of a Collection of Chants, and a book of Words of Anthems. Author of The Art of reading Church Music.
Organist of
1825 - 1846
1825 - 1846
All Saints', Oxford, 1839
St. Mary's, Kidderminster, 1846.
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Degrees logo1826
Mus. Bac.—William Marshall, of Ch. Ch.*
Born in 1806, and educated at the Chapel Royal, under J. Stafford Smith and William Hawes. He was appointed Organist of Ch. Ch. and St. John's College in 1823, proceeded Mus. Doc. in 1840, and in 1846 became Organist of St. Mary's, Kidderminster.
He died in 1875.
His publications are The Art of Reading Church Music " (1842), an edition of some chants, and a book of words of anthems.

* The "Alumni Oxonienses" (Foster) gives 1826 as the date that W. Marshall took his degree, while Grove's Dictionary gives 1836, probably by a printer's error.
Extract: A short historical account of the degrees in music at Oxford and Cambridge.
(Williams, C. F. Abdy)
George Marson
- 1631
George Marson burial register reads thus "1631, Feb. 5, George Marson, once one of the Petticanons of this Churche, Master of the Choristers, and Organist alsoe of this Churche."
Composer of Church Music. A Madrigal by George Matson is included in "The Triumphs of Oriana."
Organist of
1599 - 1631?
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George Clement Martin
11th Sep 1844 - 23rd Feb 1916
Sir George Clement Martin was born at Lambourne, Berkshire, September 11, 1844.
Pupil of J. Pearson and Sir John Stainer.
Organist of Lambourne Parish Church.
Organist to Duke of Buccleuch at Dalkeith, 1871, and St. Peter's Episcopal Church, Edinburgh, holding the two appointments simultaneously.
Master of the Choristers at St. Paul's Cathedral, 1874.
Sub-Organist of St. Paul's, 1876.
Prof. of the Organ, Royal College of Music, 1883.
Created Mus.D. by the Archbishop of Canterbury, 1883.
Knighted in 1897, when he directed the musical arrangements at the great Thanksgiving Service, held June 22, on the West steps of St. Paul's Cathedral, in celebration of the sixtieth year of the reign of H.M. Queen Victoria.
Died February 23, 1916. Buried in the Crypt of St. Paul's Cathedral.
Composer of Services, Anthems, Hymns, Carols, Part-songs, Songs, Etc.
Editor and arranger of Church and Organ Music.
Author of The Art of Training Choir Boys."
Editor, with Dr. C. H. Lloyd and others, of the New Cathedral Psalter, also of the New Cathedral Psalter Chant Book (St. Paul's Edition).
Organist of
1888 - 1916
George Clement Martin George Clement Martin
George Clement Martin
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Mus. Bac.—George Clements Martin, New College. Mus. Doc.,
Cantuar, 1883.
Extract: A short historical account of the degrees in music at Oxford and Cambridge.
(Williams, C. F. Abdy)

Logo, Newspaper article DEATH OF NOTED ORGANIST.
Sir George Clement Martin, of St Pauls, Was Once at Dalkeith.
The death occurred in London this morning of Sir George Clement Martin, Mug. Doc. organist of St Paul's Cathedral since 1888.
Deceased was born in 1844, and he was, created Knight in 1897
His compositions, were mainly for the Church.
The famous organist was created a Knight at the time of the Diamond Jubilee, in 1897, as reward from for his eminent services to St Paul's and to music generally. It is curious to remember that, before going to the Cathedral, Sir George, although he was fairly well known, and had already won a capital position in the musical world, was not nearly so popular or so familiar to the average man as many otherworthy organists in the land. His career had not been very public or notable from thepopular point of view. Compared with such great organists as Lemaire, Best, Jude Etc.he had been somewhere in the background.His work had lain principally at the smallvillage of Lambourn. and afterwards at Dalkeith, and, though he had won high praise and renown at both, yet he was hardly the man the average church musician might haveguessed would be appointed to the seat justvacated by the popular and celebrated Sir John Stainer.But the excellent judgement of the Cathedral authorities was soon justified, and, since his going to St Paul's, Sir George has advanced greatly year by year in public estimationas well as in the musical world.
Besides being a Doctor of Music and a F.R.C.O, Sir George was given the M.V.O. as a mark of the esteem in which he was held by the King and Queena.s mark of the which was held by the King and Queen.

Dundee Evening Telegraph
Wednesday 23 February 1916
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Jonathan Martin
Jonathan Martin was born 1715.
Chorister in the Chapel Royal.
Pupil of Thomas Rosingrave.
Sometime Deputy-Organist of St. George's, Hanover Square.
Died in London (of consumption); April 4,1737. Buried in the Cloisters of Westminster Abbey.
Organist of
1736 - 1737
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George Mason
George Mason composed, with John Earsden, "The Ayres that were sung and played at Brougham Castle in Westmoreland, in the King's Entertainment, given by the right honourable the Earl of Cumberland, and his right noble sonne the Lord Clifford."
His name is given as one of the composers in Clifford's Words of Anthems.
Organist of
1612 - 1629
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Samuel Matthews
1769 - 9th Dec 1832
Samuel Matthews was born 1769.
Chorister in Westminster Abbey.
Lay Clerk of Winchester Cathedral.
Died December 9, 1832. Buried in St. Botolph's Churchyard. Cambridge.
Composer of a Service in D. Arranged and published four Anthems from the works of Haydn, Mozart, and others.
Organist of
1821 - 1823
1821 - 1823
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Edward Gilbert Mercer
c.1873 - 18th Dec 1926
Edward Gilbert Mercer was assistant Music Master at Harrow School.
Served with distinction in the Great War
Colonel of tbe Harrow School Corps.
Organist of St. Michael's, Chester Square, London.
1903 - 1904 (Acting)
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Logo, Newspaper article Local Obituary
Col. E. C. Mercer. Old Boy of the King's School.
Colonel Edward Gilbert Mercer. C.M.G.. music master at Harrow School, was found dead in bed on Sunday morning at his residence, West Hill House, Harrow.
He had played the organ the terminal concert in Speech Room on Saturday might.
He was 53. The son of Mr. E. J. B. Mercer, of Bath, he was sent to the King's School, Gloucester, and went up to Magdalen. College, Oxford, where he took honours in history.
He served in the South African War with the 2nd Battalion the Royal Fusiliers, receiving the Queen's medal with four clasps.
In 1908 he was appointed a master at Harrow by Dr. Joseph Wood, and was particularly occupied in helping Dr. P. C. Buck, the director of Music.
He was both an excellent musician and an excellent teacher, and was regarded with real affection by the boys well by his colleagues, and, indeed, all who knew him.
When the Great War broke out he was over 40 years old, but he served throughout, being promoted to command the Ist London Regiment, the Royal Fusiliers, and being also mentioned in despatches and created C.M.G.
On returning to Harrow he took command the school O.T.C.
He was unmarried.

Cheltenham Chronicle
Saturday 25 December 1926
(www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk)
William Meredith
? - 5th Jan 1637
William Meredith died January 5. 1637.
On his tombstone in the Cloisters of New College, Oxford, he is described as "Vir Pius et facultate sua peritissimus." The following epitaph also upon him is from Wood's "Hist. et Antiq. Univ. Oxon.":- "Here lyes one blowne out of breath,
Who liv'd a merry life, and dyed a merry death."
Organist of
-- 1637
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John Merifield
Elected to Worcester Cathedral, November 25, 1734. Commenced duty in March, 1735.
Died 1748. Buried in the North Cloister of the Cathedral.
Organist of
1734 - 1747
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William Middlebrook
- 1756
William Middlebrook was the son of Robert Middlebrook of the city of Lincoln.
Burghersh Chanter in the Cathedral, 1717, and a Chorister, 1719.
Died 1756.
Organist of
1741 - 1756
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Hubert Stanley Middleton
11th May 1890 - 13th Aug 1959
Hubert Stanley Middleton was born at Windsor, May 11, 1890. Student of the Royal Academy of Music.
Scholar at Peterhouse, Cambridge. Organist of Truro Cathedral, 1920. Conductor of Truro and District Choral and Orchestral Society. Composer of Church Music, Organ pieces,
Organist of
1920 - 1926
1926 - 1931
1931 - 1957
Hubert Stanley Middleton Hubert Stanley Middleton
Hubert Stanley Middleton
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Samuel Mineard

Organist of
1773 - 1777

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John Mitchell
1809 - 6th Jan 1892
John Mitchell was born at Eton, 1809.
Chorister, and afterwards Lay Clerk in St. George's Chapel, Windsor, and Organist of Eton College. Resigned the latter post on the establishment of a separate Choir and Organist, 1867.
Died at Windsor, January 6, 1892.
Mitchell sang at the Coronations of George IV., William IV., and Queen Victoria, and also at the Jubilee Service in Westminster Abbey, June 21, 1887.
After the latter event Her Majesty the Queen presented him with an engraved portrait of herself as a recognition of his long musical services.
Organist of
1831 - 1867
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Edwin George Monk
13th Dec 1819 - 3rd Jan 1900
Edwin George Monk was born at Frome, December 13, 1819.
Pupil of Henry and George Field, John Hullah, Henry Phillips, and afterwards of Professor Macfarren.
Precentor of St. Columba's College, Navan, Ireland, 1844.
Music Master of St. Peter's College, Radley, 1848.
Moved to Radley 1883
Died January 3, 1900.
Composer of two Odes, Church Music, Part-songs, Editor of the "Anglican Chant Book,"
Compiler of the libretti of two Oratorios set to music by his friend Professor Macfarren.
Author of "A Descriptive Account of the York Minster Organ" (Novello, 1863).
Dr. Monk also devoted considerable attention to the study of Astronomy, and was a Fellow of the Royal Astronomical Society.
Organist of
Midsomer-Norton Parish Church, Frome
Christ Church, Frome
1844
St. Peter's College, Radley, 1848
1859 - 1883
Edwin George Monk Edwin George Monk
Edwin George Monk
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Degrees logo1848 Mus. Bac.—Edwin George Monk, of Exeter Coll. Mus. Doc., 1856
Extract: A short historical account of the degrees in music at Oxford and Cambridge.
(Williams, C. F. Abdy)

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Logo, Newspaper article OBITUARY. DR. EDWIN GEORGE MONK
Dr. Edwin George Monk. Mus. Doc., F.R.A.S., formerly organist at York Minster, died at his resi dence at Radley Berkshire, on Wednesday last
Age d80 years. Dr. Monk, who was no relation to the musician of the same name associated with "Hymns Ancient and Modern," was a native of Frome, his father being an amateur musician of local note.
After studying piano and organ at Bath with Henry and George Field, he joined Hullah’s singing classes in London.
After holding several appointments as organist, he studied harmony and composition under Sir George Macfarren. Settling in the fifties at Oxford, where he was organist and music master at Radley College, He took his bachelor’s and doctor's degrees, and by 1859 he had attained such eminence in his profession thot he was appointed to succeed Dr. Camidge asorganist and choirmaster of York Minster. This position he held fur 23 years, resigning in 1882. when he was succeeded by the late Dr. Naylor.
Dr. Monk achieved some eminence as a composer of Church music.. He published a service, and several other pieces, and edited "The Anglican Chant Book" and "The Anglican Choral Service Book." was joint editor of "The Anglican Hymn Book," and collaborated with Sir Frederick Ousley in two psalters. He was a very devout Churchman, and never sought popularity, his great aim being that devotion should be the chief end of music in public worship

Yorkshire Post and Leeds Intelligencer - Saturday 06 January 1900
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Mark James Monk
16th Mar 1858 - 5th May 1929
Mark James Monk was born at Hunmanby, March 16, 1858.
Chorister in York Cathedral, and afterwards pupil of his namesake, Dr. E. G. Monk.
Conductor of the Diocesan Festivals and of various choral bodies.
Retired 1920.
Composer of Church Music, an Elegiac Ode, a Madrigal, pieces for Pianoforte and Organ, Etc.
Organist of
St. John's, Ladywood, Birmingham, 1879
Ashby-de-la-Zouch Parish Church, 1880
Banbury Parish Church, 1883 - 1890
1890 - 1920
Mark James Monk Mark James Monk
Mark James Monk
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Degrees logo1878
Mus. Bac.—Mark James Monk, New Coll.
Mus. Doc., 1888.
Extract: A short historical account of the degrees in music at Oxford and Cambridge.
(Williams, C. F. Abdy)
Charles Harry Moody
22nd Mar 1874 - 10th May 1965
Charles Harry Moody was born at Dennis Park, Stourbridge, March 22, 1874.
Articled pupil of T. Westlake Morgan at Bangor Cathedral.
Successively Acting-Organist of St. Michael's College, Tenbury; Deputy-Organist, afterwards Acting-Organist of Wells Cathedral.
Lecturer in Music at Ripon and Wakefield Diocesan Training College from 1902.
Conductor of the Cathedral Oratorio Choir, the Huddersfield Glee and Madrigal Society, and the Halifax Choral Society.
Composer of Church and other Music.
Organist of
Wigan Parish Church, 1895
Holy Trinity Church, Coventry, 1899
1902 -
Charles Harry Moody Charles Harry Moody
Charles Harry Moody
By J.H. Bayley, Ripon
The Musical Times(May 1, 1908)
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Logo, Newspaper article LIFE INTEREST
THE recent death at the age of 91 of Dr. Charles Harry Moody, who for half a century was organist at Ripon Cathedral. Yorkshire, will bring back nostalgic memories for elderly Coventerians.
In the last year of the 1800's Dr Moody came as organist and choirmaster to Holy Trinity church. at a time when Canon F. M. Beaumont was vicar. When he was not too busy with his church work he gave piano lessons.
After he left Holy Trinity he had a distinguished musical career. By 1954 he had completed 54 years at Ripon, and was then the senior cathedral organist of Great Britain and Ireland .
But even after his retirement this remarkable man kept up his musical interest. Only two years ago his music was played at a Westminster Abbey Service commemorating the 800th anniversary of the founding of Fountains Abbey near Ripon.


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Tom Westlake Morgan
1869 - 1937
Tom Westlake Morgan was born at Congresbury, Somerset, 1869.
Chorister in King's College,Cambridge, and afterwards Pupil-Assistant to Dr. Mann.
Student at the Royal College of Music.
Appointed Examiner to the Welsh Section cf the Incorporated Society of Musicians, 1894.
Music Master of the North Wales Training College, Bangor, 1895-1897.
Collected funds for, and superintended the building of, the large four-manual organ by Hill in Bangor Cathedral, opened in 1897.
Composer and editor of Church Music, Etc.
Organist of
St. Catharine's College
St. George's Church, Paris, 1889
St. John's, Wilton Road, London, 1890
St. David's, Merthyr Tydvil, 1891
1892 - 1906
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Logo, Newspaper article DR WESTLAKE MORGAN.
FEW EMPTY SEATS AT THE HULL CITY HALL
ORGAN RECITAL POPULARITY, was last year that the Hull Corporation Property Committee decided upon what was the courageous policy in view of the meagre support received by most musical events in the city, of arranging for series of organ recitals on the City Hall organ. It was thought that the fine instrument the hall was allowed remain mute for too long. The experiment, while not meeting with the public support it deserved, was not a failure financially for the series of organ recitals given just about paid their way, and it was decided organise similar series of recitals during this season. The first was given on Monday night when the recitalist was that thoroughly sound musician, Dr Westlake Morgan, and, despite the counter attraction of the Monday night opening theatre performances, there were few vacant seats the hall. Dr Morgan's programme was strangely varied. On one band there was all the majesty and dignity of Bach's famous prelude and fugue in B minor, and the other the tricks of The Storm," and the closing sweetness Ketelby's Monastery Garden." - For the former, which it was stated on the programme was a request to which the performer had pleasure acceding, we had the expected black out," with the accompaniment lightning effects, engineered by switch board artist," who made the City Hall lights twinkle. This item was the most popular of the evening, and the audience followed The Storm ' the organ by another " storm ' —of applause, but one could not help regretting that Handel's fine theme the Cuckoo and Nightingale " concerto had been commandeered to lend hand an item which can musically have little to commend it. The recitalist throughout showed himself a thorough master of bis instrument. The technical difficulties of the Prelude and Fugue were overcome with consummate ease, and the pedal work was especially impressive. Other organ items were the overture to Eurvanthe " (Weber), Song of Sorrow" Nevin), Berceuse in D Flat " (Theodore Salome), Offertoire (No. 3), De Ste Cecile " (Jules Grison), The Village Harvest Home (Walter Spinney), and Carillon (Leon Boellman).

Hull Daily Mail - Tuesday 13 November 1928
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Thomas Morley
1557 - 1604
Thomas Morley was born about 1557.
Chorister in St. Paul's. Pupil of Bird. Probably for some time Organist of St. Giles', Cripplegate. Resigned the post of Organist of St. Paul's on his appointment as a Gentleman of the Chapel Royal in 1592, which he held until 1602.
Died in 1604.
Composer of Church Music (including a Service for the Burial of the Dead), Madrigals, Canzonets, Lessons for the Virginals. Author of "A Plaine and Easie Introduction to Practicall Musicke," set down in the forme of a dialogue. Divided into three partes. The first teacheth to sing with all things necessary for the knowledge of prickt song. The second treateth of descante and to sing two parts in one upon a plain song or ground, with other things necessary for a descanter. The third and last part entreateth of composition of three, foure, five, or more parts, with many profitable rules to that effect, with new songs of 2, 3, 4. and 5 parts (London, 1597). This work was dedicated to "the most excellent musician Maister William Birde."
In 1598 Morley was granted a patent for the exclusive right of printing music.
Organist of
1591 - 1592
Thomas Morley Thomas Morley
Thomas Morley

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Degrees logo1588.
Mus. Bac. — Thomas Morley, born 1557, a pupil of Bird. In 1592 he became Gentleman of the Chapel Royal ; in 1598 he obtained a patent for the exclusive right of printing music books. He was a prolific composer of madrigals, church and instrumental music, much of which has been republished in modern times. He occupies an important position in musical history through his Plaine and Easie Introduction to Practicall Music, published in 1597, the first regular treatise on music published in England. This work contains many things relating to ancient notation which are not found in other treatises of his day. Several editions of it have been published, and in the seventeenth century it was translated into German, under the title Musica Practica, by J. C. Trost. Morley died in 1604. Fétis* places him above Bird in merit as a composer, and considers that he had profited much by the study of the works Of Palestrina.
Extract: A short historical account of the degrees in music at Oxford and Cambridge.
(Williams, C. F. Abdy)
Herbert C. Morris
18th Jun 1873 - 1940
Herbert C. Morris was born at Coventry, June 18, 1873.
Pupil of Frank Spinney, at Leamington ; A. H. Brewer, at Coventry; and Sir Walter Parratt and others, at the Royal College of Music.
Assistant-Organist of Manchester Cathedral.
Composer of Anthems, Services, Etc.
Organist of
Parish Church, Kenilworth
various Churches in London
Boscombe Pavilion
St. Andrew's, Bath, 1896
1896 -
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John Mudd
John Mudd was Organist, Vicar Choral, and Epistoler.
Probably grandfather or some early relative of the Mudd who was Organist of Lincoln Cathedral.
Joint Organist of Peterborough Cathedral with Richard Tiller, 1583 - 1592
In 1629 he was awarded £4 as "benevolence money."
Buried in St. Giles', Cripplegate, London, July 26, 1639.
A Complete Service and four Anthems by him are included in the Ely MS. Collection. An 8vo edition of his Anthem, "
O God, Who hast preparedSheet music
Presto Sheet music
," was issued by Messrs. Novello.
Organist of
1592 - 1639
Thomas(?) Mudd
Thomas(?) Mudd. Possibly the Thomas Mudde given as one of the composers in Clifford's Words of Anthems.
Great complaints were made to Dean Honywood of his drunkenness, as will be seen from the following extracts from letters, written by the Precentor to the Dean . -—
"14 March, 1662/3.
"Mr. Mudd hath been so debauched these assizes, and hath so abused Mr. Derby that he will hardly bee persuaded to stay to finish his worke unlesse Mudd bee removed.* And I have stuck in the same Mudd too; † for he hath abused mee above hope of Pardon. I wish you would be pleased to send us downe an able and more civill organist."
"16 March, 1662." "Yesterday Mr. Mudd shewed the effects of his last weeke's tipling, for when Mr. Joynes was in the midst of his sermon Mudd fell a-singing aloud, insomuch as Mr. Joynes was compelled to stopp ; all the auditorie gazed and wondered what was the matter, and at length some neere him, stopping his mouth, silenced him, and then Mr. Joynes proceeded: but this con- tinued for the space of neere halfe a quarter of an houre. So that now wee dare trust him no more with our organ, but request you (if you can) to helpe us to another; and with what speed may be."
Organist of
1662 - 1663
John Mundy (munday, Or Mundie)
1555 – 29th Jun 1630
John Mundy is said to have succeeded Marbeck as Organist at St. George's Chapel.
Pupil of his father, William Mundy, and for some time Organist of Eton College.
Died 1630. Buried in the Cloisters, St. George's Chapel.
Composer of Church Music, Madrigals, "Songs and Psalms," Etc.
There are several pieces by him in the Fitzwilliam Virginal Book.
Organist of
c.1575
1585 - 1630
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Degrees logo1586
Mus. Bac.—John Munday, of Christ Church, one of the Organists to Queen Elizabeth, and successor to Marbeck, at Windsor, about 1585.
He was held in "high esteem," both as a theorist and a practical musician.
He published, in 1594, "Songs and Psalms composed into three, four, and five parts, for the use and delight of such as either love or learne musicke." Burney gives a part-song by him, "In deep distresse."
In 1624 he took the degree of Mus. Doc.
Compositions by him are contained in the "Triumphs Of Oriana," Barnard's MS. Collections, Burney's MSS., and the so-called "Queen Elizabeth's Virginal Book."
He died 1630.
Extract: A short historical account of the degrees in music at Oxford and Cambridge.
(Williams, C. F. Abdy)
F. Ouseley
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Clement Charlton Palmer
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Walter Parratt
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Dodd Perkins
1750 - 9th Apr 1820
Dodd Perkins Was a composer of Songs, Glees Etc. Two chants by him are contained in Dr. Beckwith's Collection. Died April 9 1820. Buried in the "Palm Churchyard"e.
Organist of
1781 - 1819

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William Perkins
c.1784 - 11th Nov 1860
William Perkins was the son of the Dodd Perkins.
He wrote a Double Chant in E, traditionally known at Wells as "
Malibran's
Maria Felicia Malibran
24 Mar 1808 – 23 Sept 1836
Spanish singer who commonly sang both contralto and soprano parts,
Chant," from the circumstance of that great singer joining in it at Wells Cathedral, August 22, 1830.
Died November 11, 1860. Buried by the side of his father.
Two Anthems by him, "I cried unto the Lord" and "O Lord, our Governour," are in the Cathedral books.
Organist of
1819 - 1860

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Logo, Newspaper article Deaths
Nov. 11, Horsington, near Wells, William Perkins, Esq., aged 76.
Deceased was for many years in the Commission of the Peace for Wells, and several times filled the civic chair.
He was formerly the organist and vicarchoral of Wells Cathedral.

Taunton Courier, and Western Advertiser
Wednesday 21 November 1860
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