4 Classical Organists pre 1900 M to P
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Directory of Past Classical Organists


Extract from Cathedral Organists Past and Present
By John E. West
Published in 1921
Additional information from the British Newspaper Archive.

This page is still a work in progress

A - B - C - D - E - F - G - H - I - J - K - L - M - N - O - P - Q - R - S - T - U - V - W   *
Charles Donald Maclean
27th Mar 1843 - 23rd Jun 1916
Charles Donald Maclean was born at Cambridge, March 27, 1843.
A pupil of Ferdinand Biller at Cologne.
Director of the Music at Eton College, 1872. Resigned the post at Eton and was for some years resident in India.
Eventually settled in London.
Died June 23, 1916.
Composer of an Oratorio, "Noah," a Cantata. "Sulmala," a Requiem Mass, Church Music, Orchestral Music, Chamber Music, Songs, Pianoforte pieces. Etc.
Organist of
Exeter College, Oxford, 1862
1872 - 1875

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Logo, Newspaper article ETON. The College.
The office of musical instructor at the College, vacant by Dr. Haynes's resignation, has been filled up by Dr. Hornby, the head master, with the selection Mr. Charles Donald Maclean, M.A., Mus. Doc, of Exeter College, Oxford, and formerly organist of Exeter College and of the Madras Cathedral, and conductor of the Madras Philharmonic Society.
The post of organist, which is in the gift of the college, was also at the same time conferred on Dr. Maclean.

Bucks Herald
Saturday 13 April 1872
(www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk)
Logo, Newspaper article CIVIL SERVICE OF INDIA
The undermentioned candidates, selected in 1964, have passed the "further examination":-
Charles Donald Maclean.    Madras    (Mark = 1242)
Saunders's News-Letter
Tuesday 01 August 1865
(www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk)
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In a Convocation holden on Friday. at two o'clock, a grace was passed granting permission to Charles Donald Maclean. Bachelor of Music, of Exeter College, to proceed to the degree of doctor in that faculty earlier than permitted by the statuses in order that he may proceed at once to India.

Oxford Times
Saturday 11 November 1865
(www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk)
Logo, Newspaper article MUSICAL NOTES
The career of Dr. Charles Donald Maclean, who died recently, was peculiar, possibly unique, in the fact that he combined music with long period of work in India as an Indian Civil servant.
Born in 1843, he was educated at Shrewsbury and Exeter College, Oxford, of which he was a scholar.
He was organist of his college and took his degree of Doctor of Music at the early age of 22.
For a few years he was organist and music director at Eton, being succeeded by Sir Joseph Barnby.
In India he held appointments chiefly in Madras. Returning to England in 1593, he became general secretary of the International Musical Society, which before the war had its headquarters Leipzig.
Dr. Maclean produced long list of musical compositions.

Western Daily Press
Monday 03 July 1916
(www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk)
Charles Stewart Macpherson
20th May 1870 - 28th May 1927
Charles Stewart Macpherson was born in Edinburgh, May 20, 1870.
Chorister in St. Paul's Cathedral.
Student of the Royal Academy of Music.
Sub-Organist of St. Paul's Cathedral, 1895.
Composer of an Orchestral Overture and two Suites, 137th Psalm for soli, chorus, and orchestra, Church Music, Part-songs, a Fantasy Prelude for the Organ.
Arranger of Scottish Music. Editor of "The New Cathedral Psalter Chant Book" (Village Church Edition).
Lecturer on musical subjects, Etc.
Organist of
St. David's, Weem, Aberfeldy, 1887;
Private Chapel, Luton Hoo, Beds, 1889;
1916 - 1927
Charles Stewart Macpherson Charles Stewart Macpherson
Charles Stewart Macpherson
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Logo, Newspaper article FAMOUS ORGANIST DEAD
LATE DR. MACPHERSON.
Dr Charles Macpherson, the famous organist of St Paul ' s Cathedral, and whose association with the Cathedral covered almost the whole of his life, died in the street on Saturday afternoon. With his wife he had been to the Grosvenor Hotel, near Victoria Station, London, when he was suddenly taken ill, and fell on the pavement. His wife called a taxi-cab, and Dr Macpherson was assisted into this and taken to St George ' s Hospital. On arrival he was found to be dead-it is believed from heart failure.
He had seemed in his usual health and good spirits up to the time of his seizure He was at St Paul's on Thursday and Friday evening, and on Saturday morning he was laughing and chatting with his friends.
NATIVE OF EDINBURGH.
Dr Macpherson, who was born in Edinburgh in 1870, was the son of the late Charles Macpherson, City Architect. He went to St Paul's as a choir boy in 1870, and was educated at the Choir School. Leaving St. Paul's, where he had also been an organ pupil in 1887, he was for about two years organist of St David's, Weem, near Aberfeldy. From 1889 until 1895 he was organist of the private chapel at Luton Hoo, Bedfordshire, the residence of the late Madame de Falbe. In the latter years he was appointed sub-organist at St Paul's, and in 1916 succeeded Sir George Martin as organist.
From 1890 he was, for five years, a student at the Royal Academy of Music, where he took the Charles Lucas Medal for Composition. Dr Macpherson (the degree was conferred by the University of Durham, honoris causa) produced a number of compositions, orchestral, chamber music, choral, and for organ. Among these are an Overture and an Orchestral Suite on Highland themes, which are still in manuscript, the orchestral "Hallowe'en," and the cantata, "By the Waters of Babylon." His "Te Deum" was written for the signing of peace in 1918.
Dr Macpherson's marriage to Miss Newbolt, daughter of Canon Newbolt, had a peculiar interest in that it was the first wedding in St Paul's within living memory, as St Paul's is not licensed for marriages, and special permission and licence had to be obtained. Dr and Mrs Macpherson had one son, who is now at Uppingham School. In the leisure moments of a busy life, the late Dr Macpherson found recreation in sketching and golf.

The Scotsman - Monday 30 May 1927
(www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk)
Arthur Henry Mann
16th May 1850 - 19th Nov 1929
Arthur Henry Mann was born at Norwich, May 16, 1850.
Chorister in Norwich Cathedral, and Assistant-Organist there to Dr. Z. Buck.
Composer of Church Music, Organ Music, Part-songs, Etc.
Editor of Talus's Motet for forty voices, and other music.
One of the Compilers of the Music Catalogue of the Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge.
Musical Editor of Church of England Hymnal, Etc.
Organist of
St. Peter's, Wolverhampton, 1870;
Tettenhall Parish Church, 1871;
Beverley Minster,1875;
1876 - 1929
Cambridge University 1897
Arthur Henry Mann Arthur Henry Mann
Arthur Henry Mann
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Degrees logo1882
Mus. Doc. Arthur Nenry Mann, New Coll.
Extract: A short historical account of the degrees in music at Oxford and Cambridge.
(Williams, C. F. Abdy)

Logo, Newspaper article DR. A. H. MANN.
Fatal Seizures of Famous Cambridge Organist.
Dr. Arthur Henry Mann, University organist and organist of King's College Chapel, died at a Cambridge nursing home yesterday. He was in his eightieth year, and was one of the most distinguished musical figures at Cambridge.
Dr. Mann played at the service at King's College Chapel on Sunday morning, and sung in the world-famous choir, as he was wont to do at unaccompanied services, in the afternoon. On Monday he had two seizures, which proved fatal.
He was a native of Norwich. He secured his Mus.Bac.Oxon in 1875, and followed that with the Mus.Doc.Oxon the following year. In 1870 he became organist at St. Peter's, Wolverhampton, in 1871 of Tettenhall Parish Church, and in 1875 of Beverley Minster. He was organist of King's College Chapel at the early age twenty-six, which post he held until the day of his death. His knowledge of Handel was profound, and he was the composer hymn tunes which have remained prime favourites.
Yorkshire Post and Leeds Intelligencer
Wednesday 20 November 1929
(www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk)
Charles George Marchant
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Organist of
E. G. Monk
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Organist of

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Dictionary of National Biography

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F. Ouseley
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Organist of
Clement Charlton Palmer
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Organist of
Walter Parratt
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Organist of
Dodd Perkins
1750 - 9th Apr 1820
Dodd Perkins Was a composer of Songs, Glees Etc. Two chants by him are contained in Dr. Beckwith's Collection. Died April 9 1820. Buried in the "Palm Churchyard"e.
Organist of
1781 - 1819

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William Perkins
c.1784 - 11th Nov 1860
William Perkins was the son of the Dodd Perkins.
He wrote a Double Chant in E, traditionally known at Wells as "
Malibran's
Maria Felicia Malibran
24 Mar 1808 – 23 Sept 1836
Spanish singer who commonly sang both contralto and soprano parts,
Chant," from the circumstance of that great singer joining in it at Wells Cathedral, August 22, 1830.
Died November 11, 1860. Buried by the side of his father.
Two Anthems by him, "I cried unto the Lord" and "O Lord, our Governour," are in the Cathedral books.
Organist of
1819 - 1860

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Logo, Newspaper article Deaths
Nov. 11, Horsington, near Wells, William Perkins, Esq., aged 76.
Deceased was for many years in the Commission of the Peace for Wells, and several times filled the civic chair.
He was formerly the organist and vicarchoral of Wells Cathedral.

Taunton Courier, and Western Advertiser
Wednesday 21 November 1860
(www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk)