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Directory of Past Classical Organists


Extract from Cathedral Organists Past and Present
By John E. West
Published in 1921
Additional information from the British Newspaper Archive.

This page is still a work in progress

A - B - C - D - E - F - G - H - I - J - K - L - M - N - O - P - Q - R - S - T - U - V - W   *
Charles Quarles
- 1727
Charles Quarles was probably son of Charles Quarles, the builder of the Organs at Pembroke and Christ Colleges, Cambridge, in 1707.
Composer of Church Music, Etc. A "Lesson for the Harpsichord" by him was published by Goodison in 1788.
Organist of
, 1688 - 1709
1722 - 1727
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Dictionary of National Biography

Logo of the Composers of Classical Music web site In 1722 he became Organist of York Minster. He died in 1727.
The only composition by him known is "A Lesson for the Harpsichord," printed by Goodison about 1788.
Composers of Classical Music
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Logo, Newspaper article ORGAN RECITAL AT HOLY TRINITY
The next was a Minuet in the ancient style, written by Charles Quarles, sometime organist at Trinity College, Cambridge.

Hastings and St Leonards Observer
Saturday 29 July 1922
(www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk)

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Quarles, Charles, organist and composer of the early part of the 18th century. He was organist of Trinity College, Cambridge, and in 1698 he graduated Mus. Bac, Cambridge.
In 1722 he was made organist of York Minster. He died at York, in 1727.
He composed lessons for the harpsichord, etc.

British Musical Biography
James Duff Brown , Stephen Samuel Stratton
1897
Robert Ramsey
1590s – 1644
Robert Ramsey was required to compose for his degree a "Canticum" to be performed at St. Mary's Church. A Service in F by him is in the Tudway Collection. There are also Services, Anthems, Etc., at the British Museum, Ely, and Peterhouse, Cambridge.
Dr. Jebb has included settings of the Litany (to English and Latin words), by Ramsey, in his "Choral Responses and Litanies."
He is also one of the composers mentioned in Cliffords Words of Anthems.
Organist of
1628? - 1644

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Ramsey, Robert, organist and composer, of latter part of the 16th and beginning of 17th centuries. He graduated Mus. Bac. Cambridge, in 1616, and was organist of Trinity College. He composed a Service in F, and various anthems.

British Musical Biography
James Duff Brown , Stephen Samuel Stratton
1897
John Randall
1715 - 18th Mar 1799
John Randall was born in 1715.
Chorister in the Chapel Royal.
Organist to Cambridge University and Pembroke Hall. University Professor of Music, 1755.
Died March 18, 1799. Buried in St. Benet's Churchyard, Cambridge.
Composer of Church Music, Songs, Etc. One or two of his Chants were well known in 1921
Organist of
, 1743 - 1799
1777 - 1799
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Degrees logo1744.
Mus. Bac. — John Randall.

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Randall, John, organist and composer, was boru in 1715. Chorister in Chapel Royal under B. Gates. Mus. Bac, Cantab., 1744.
Organist of Trinity College, St. John's College, King's College, 1775, and Pembroke Hall, Cambridge. Professor of Music Cambridge University, in succession to M. Greene, 1755.
Mus. Doc, Cantab., 1756.
He died at Cambridge, March 18, 1799, aged 83.
Composer of odes, anthems, psalms, and chants, and a "Collection of Psalm and Hymn Tunes, some of which are new, others by perinission of the authors." Cambridge, 1794. Songs : Happy Swain,

British Musical Biography
James Duff Brown , Stephen Samuel Stratton
1897
William Randall
William Randall (or Randoll) was a Chorister in Exeter Cathedral.
His name first appears as Organist of the Chapel Royal in 1592 (Chapel Royal Cheque Book).
Composer of Church Music.
Organist of
1592 - 1603?
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Dictionary of National Biography
William Raylton
- 1757
William Raylton was a pupil of Dr. Croft.
Died 1757.
Composer of Church Music.
His Service in A was still sung at Canterbury in 1921, and a Service in E flat and one or two Anthems are in MS. in Canterbury Cathedral books. A setting of the opening Burial Sentences by him is to be found in Vincent Novello's Collection of Purcell's Sacred Music, Vol. IV.
Organist of
1736 - 1757
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Oxford Music Online
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Lloyd Raynor
Lloyd Raynor was a Chorister in Lincoln Cathedral, 1746, and Master of the Song School, Newark-on-Trent.
On September 10, 1771, he was &arraigned and reproved for playing one Anthem while Mr. Binns was singing another&; and, &for insolence,& was suspended from his offce till he apologized.
Dismissed from the post September 17, 1784 ; but afterwards &submitted,& and was allowed a pension of £10 a year, which, however, was discontinued after the first year.
Organist of
1756 - 1784
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Logo, Newspaper article A History of Lincoln Minster
Raynor had been organist at Newark prior to his appointment at Lincoln. Raynor proved less than satisfactory. He amused himself by attempting to throw the soloists Off their stride in the anthems. Brought before the chapter following one such incident in 1771 when a Mr Binns, one of the vicars choral, found himself singing one anthem, whilst Raynor played the Organ in the Tune of a different Anthem whereby the Singer was interrupted and the Choir put into Confusion; he was rebuked; some years later (1784) he abused and threatened the Dean 'in the grossest manner', and his services were dispensed with.
John Reading
John Reading was probably a native of Lincoln, and a relative of John Reading, Organist of Winchester Cathedral, 1675-1692. Composer of Church Music, Etc.
Organist of
1668 - 1674?
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John Reading
c.1645 - 1692
John Reading was Lay Vicar of Lincoln Cathedral, 1667, and Master of the Choristers there, 1670.
Died at Winchester, 1692. Probably buried in the Cloisters of Winchester College.
During Reading's time at Winchester College the organist's salary was increased from £5 to £50 per annum.
Composer of Church Music, and of the Winchester College &Graces.&
Organist of
1675 - 1681
1681- 1692
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John Redford
1486? - 1547
John Redford was born about 1486.
Chorister in St. Paul's Cathedral, afterwards Vicar Choral there, and subsequently Organist and Almoner, the latter appointment including the duties of Master of the Boys.
His Anthem, &Rejoice in the Lord alway,& is still(1921) sung at St. Paul's and elsewhere.
An edition in 8vo size, by Sir George Martin, was issued some years ago by Messrs. Novello. Redford composed some pieces for the organ, one or two of which have been published in recent years. He was also author of the Interlude of &Wyt and Science,& performed in 1538-39.
His name appears among the Vicars Choral in the &Declaration by the Sub-Dean and Canons of St. Paul's, of allegiance to Henry VIII. and Queen Anne Boleyn,& June 20, 1534.
He is mentioned among the distinguished musicians of his time in Morley's &Plaine and Easie Introduction to Practicall Musicke& (1597).
Tusser, in his &Five Hundred Points of Husbandry,& gives the following
eulogy of him :——
By friendship's lot to Paul's I got,
So found I grace a certain fpace
Still to remaine
With Redford there, the like no where
For cunning fuch and vertue much,
By whom fome part of mufic's art
So did I gaine.

Organist of
1525 - 1540

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Arthur Richardson
- 1826
Arthur Richardson was lay Vicar Choral at st. David's. Formerly Assistant-Organist of Armagh Cathedral. He appears, from entries in the St. David's books, to have also been tuner of the organ.
Died 1826.
Organist of
1787 - 1826
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Alfred Madeley Richardson
Alfred Madeley Richardson was Born at Southend, 1868.
A pupil of W. Haynes at Malvern, and afterwards of Sir Walter Parratt, Sir Hubert Parry, and others.
Organ Scholar at Keble College, Oxford, 1885.
Resigned the position at Southwark Cathedral 1909, and went to America.
He wrote a number of books, his Extempore Playing has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. His 'Modern Organ Accompaminent' is available to read on line.
Composer of Church Music, Part-songs, Etc.
Organist of
Hindlip Church, Worcester, 1889
Holy Trinity, Sloane Street
St. Jude's, Cray's Inn Road
Holy Trinity, Scarborough, 1892 - 1897
1897 - 1909
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Degrees logo1888
New Coll. Mus. Bac.— Alfred Madeley Richardson, Keble Coll. B.A., 1888; M.A., 1892.
Extract: A short historical account of the degrees in music at Oxford and Cambridge.
(Williams, C. F. Abdy)

Link to on line books by A.M.Richardson

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Richardson, Alfred Madeley, organist, studied under William Haynes, of Malvern, and at R.C.M. Organ Scholar, Keble College, Oxford, 1885-9. Graduated Mus. Bac, and B.A., 1888 ; M.A., 1892, Oxford. F.R.C.O. Obtained diploma of A.CO. when sixteen, and was then organist of Emmanuel Church, Malvern. Gave recitals in the Priory Church there, 1884. Organist of Hindlip Church, Worcester, 1889 ; Holy Trinity, Sloane Street, London ; St. Jude's, Gray's Inn Road ; All Saints', Scarborough, 1892 ; St. Saviour's Cathedral, Southwark, 1897. He has published church services, part-songs, etc.

British Musical Biography
James Duff Brown , Stephen Samuel Stratton
1897
John Elliott Richardson
1825-1910
John Elliott Richardson was born at Salisbury
Pupil of A. T. Corfe, and Assistant-Organist at Salisbury for eighteen years.
Resigned the appointment at Salisbury owing to ill-health. Afterwards became Organist of a Roman Catholic Church at Bognor.
Composer of Church Music. Editor of the Salisbury Chant Book, a Collection of Sanctuses and Kyries, and a book of Voluntaries for the Organ.
Organist of
1863 - 1881
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Richardson, John Elliott, organist and composer, born at Salisbury. Studied at Salisbury Cathedral, under A. T. Corfe, whose assistant organist he was for eighteen years. Appointed organist and master of the choristers, in 1863, after the death of A. T. Corfe.
Conductor of Sarum Choral Society, 1849-69. Resigned Cathedral appointment, 1881, owing to ill-health.
He composed a service in F ; I will give thanks ; Turn Thee, O Lord ; and other anthems.
Author of "Salisbury Chant Book," Salisbury, 1859; "The Tour of a Cathedral Organist," Salisbury, 1870. Editor of anthems by Greene, etc.

British Musical Biography
James Duff Brown , Stephen Samuel Stratton
1897
Vaughan Richardson
c.1670 - 1729
Vaughan Richardson was a Chorister in the Chapel Royal and a Pupil of Blow.
Temporary Organist for a short time at Worcester Cathedral, before his appointment to Winchester.
Died 1729.
Composer of Church Music, Odes, Cantatas, Songs, Etc. His Anthem, "O how amiable," is still in frequent use(c1921) in all "choirs and places where they sing."

Organist of
1686 - 1688
1692 - 1729

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A song in praise of St Cecilia
Eboracum Baroque
YouTube Channel

Logo, Newspaper article O how Amiable
Sheet music
William Weaver Ringrose
c1839 - 1884
William Weaver Ringrose
Shortly after leaving Southwell his mind gave way, and he died.
Organist of
All Saints', Clifton
1876 - 1879
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Batchelor Of Music
William Weaver Ringrose

Daily Telegraph & Courier (London)
Friday 20 May 1870
(www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk)
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Oh How Amiable Psalm LXXXIV
George Riseley
28th Aug 1845 - 12th Apr 1932
George Riseley was born at Bristol, August 28, 1845.
A Chorister in Bristol Cathedral, 1852. Afterwards articled pupil to J. D. Corfe. Assistant-Organist of Bristol Cathedral and Organist of various churches in and around Bristol.
Conductor of the Colston Hall Concerts, and, following Sir Charles Hallé's death, of the Bristol Musical Festival. Conductor of the Bristol Royal Orpheus Glee Society, 1878. Conductor of the Bristol Society of Instrumentalists, 1887. Conductor of the Bristol Choral Society, 1889. For some time Professor of the Organ at the Royal Academy of Music, Conductor of the Queen's Hall Choral Society, and Musical Director of the Alexandra Palace, in London; resigning these appointments later.
Organist of
Colston Hall, Bristol, 1870
1876 - 1898
George Riseley George Riseley
George Riseley

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Logo, Newspaper article MR. GEORGE RISELEY DEAD
FAMOUS BRISTOL CONDUCTOR
Mr. George Riseley, cx-Sheriff of Bristol, died to-day, aged 87. For many years conducted the Bristol Musical Festival, the Bristol Choral Society, and the Royal Orpheus Glee Society, and for fully 50 years he was the leading personality in musical circles in the West of England. The Royal Orpheus Glee Society gave Royal command performances at Buckingham Palace and Windsor Castle under Mr. Riseley. Mr. Riseley was articled 70 years ago to the organist Bristol Cathedral, and was appointed organist and choirmaster in 1876. founded the Bristol Society of Instrumentalists in 1877, and became conductor to the Royal Orpheus Glee Society in following year. He was conductor of the Bristol Choral Society for many years,

Gloucester Citizen
Tuesday 12 April 1932
(www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk)
John Varley Roberts
John Varley Roberts, M.A., Propter merita, was born at Stanningley, near Leeds, September 25, 1841.
Conductor of the Oxford Choral and Philharmonic Society, 1885-1893.
Founder and first Conductor of the University Glee and Madrigal Society.
Lecturer in Harmony and Counterpoint for the University Professor of Music. One of the Examiners for University Musical Degrees.
Retired December 31, 1918. Died February 9, 1920.
Composer of Church Music, Organ pieces, Songs, Part-songs, Etc.
Editor of the "Parish Church Chant Book," Etc.
Organist of
St. John's, Farsley (12 Yrs old)
St. Bartholomew's, Armley, 1862
Halifax Parish Church, 1868
1882 - 1918
St. Giles's, Oxford, 1885 - 1893
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Degrees logo1876
Mus. Doc. John Varley Roberts
Extract: A short historical account of the degrees in music at Oxford and Cambridge.
(Williams, C. F. Abdy)

Logo, Newspaper article DEATH OF DR. VARLEY ROBERTS
Famous Organist, Choirmaster and Composer.
By the death or Dr. J. Varley Roberts, which. has just taken place at Oxford, British Church music Ioses a. predominant figure. The deceased musician was a, Yorkshirernan having been born at Stanningley, near Leeds, on September 25th, 1841. His talent developed early, and at 12 years of age he held a responsible position as organist at Farsley, near Leeds, After filling a number of positions as organist and choirmaster in mid-Yorkshire, including that at Halifax Parish Church, he was, in 1882, elected organist and master of the choristers at Magdalen College, Oxford, succeeding Sir Walter:. Parratt, and it was while occupying this position —which is regarded as one of the plums of the musical profession—that his wide fame was built up,

Extract:- Sheffield Daily Telegraph
Tuesday 10 February 1920
(www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk)
Robert Roberts
24th May 1840 - 9th Feb 1871
Robert Roberts was born in St. Anne's Parish, Llandegai, near Bangor, May 24, 1840.
A Chorister in St. Anne's Church. Pupil of H. S. Hayden (Organist of St. Mary's, Carnarvon, and son of William Hayden, Deputy-Organist of St. Asaph Cathedral. Student of the North Wales College for Schoolmasters, Carnarvon, where he became successively Third Master, Third Master and Music Master, and Music Master only.
Assistant-Organist of Bangor Cathedral, 1866; Organist, 1868 (appointed probationally by the year.)
Died of pleurisy, February 9, 1871. Buried in Glanadda Cemetery, Bangor.
Composer of a Welsh Funeral Service, Cantata, "The Siege of Harlech Castle," Part-songs, Etc.
A window was erected to his memory, and that of the Principal's two children, in the North Wales Training College Chapel at Carnarvon (now removed to Bangor). He was much beloved and respected, and his death, at the age of thirty, was greatly deplored. At the funeral service, held in the Cathedral, Spohr's "Blest are the departed" was sung, when one of the choristers, William Jones (a great favourite of the deceased Organist), became so affected during the singing of one of the solo portions that he completely broke down, and sobbed aloud.
Organist of
1868 - 1871
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Dictionary of Welsh Biography
Francis James Robinson
1799 - 21st Oct 1872
Francis James Robinson was born in Dublin, 1799.
Chorister in Christ Church Cathedral. Assistant Organist of Christ Church Cathedral, 1816. Vicar Choral of Christ Church Cathedral, 1833 ; Vicar Choral of St. Patrick's Cathedral, 1843.
Died October 21, 1872. Composer of Church Music, Songs, Etc.
Editor of a collection of Irish Melodies.
The greatest tenor singer that the Dublin Cathedrals have ever possessed
Organist of
1828
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John Robinson
1812 - 1844
John Robinson wasborn 1812(?). Brother to Francis James Robinson.
Chorister in Christ Cathedral Dublin.
Died 1844.
Organist of
, 1829
Trinity Chapel, 1834
, 1841
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John Robinson
1682 - 30th Apr 1762
John Robinson was born 1682.
Chorister in the Chapel Royal, and pupil of Blow.
Deputy-Organist at Westminster Abbey for some years before succeeding Dr. Croft in the full offce.
Died April 30, 1762. Buried in the North Aisle of the Choir of the Abbey, in the same grave as Dr. Croft.
His Double Chant in E flat, said to have been the favourite of George Ill., is still very popular. (c1921)
Boyce, in the biographical notes to his "Cathedral Music," describes Robinson as "a most excellent performer on the organ."
From the following memorandum, in a MS. book at the Abbey, it appears that during Robinson's time the organ was removed from its ancient position in the North Choir Aisle to the Screen :— "The new organ built by Mr. Shrider and Mr. Jordan was opened on the 1st August, 1730, by Mr. Robinson ; the anthem, Purcell's 'O give thanks.'"
Organist of
St. Lawrence, Jewry, 1710 - 1762
St. Magnus, London Bridge, 1713 - 1762
1727 - 1762

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James Roche
? - 6th Jun 1811
James Roche Organist and Master of the boys.
Paid for keeping the organ in repair and tune.
Died June 6, 1811.
Organist of
1797 - 1811
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Benjamin Rogers
May 1614 – Jun 1698
Benjamin Rogers, was born at Windsor, 1614. Chorister in St. George's Chapel, Windsor, and afterwards Lay Clerk there. Organist of Christ Church Cathedral, Dublin, 1639. Returned to England owing to the Rebellion and was again Lay Clerk of Windsor until 1644, when the Choir was disbanded.
After the Restoration he became Organist of Eton College and, for the third time, Lay Clerk of Windsor, also Assistant-Organist there to Dr. Child. Organist and "Informator Choristarum" of Magdalen College, Oxford, 1664, at a salary of £60 per annum and rooms in the College.
Was dismissed by the College, 1685-6, but was allowed a pension of £30, and lived in comparative obscurity at Oxford until his death in June, 1698. Buried at St. Peter-le-Bailey, Oxford.
Composer of much Church Music, Glees. Suites for Strings, and the Hymn "Te Deum Patrem colimus," which is sung annually on May 1st at early morning on the Magdalen Tower. Some of his Anthems are in MS. at Magdalen and New Colleges.
One cause of his dismissal was "his troublesome behaviour in the Chapel, where usually he would talk so loud in the organ loft, that he offended the company, and would not leave it off, though he hath been sent to by the President not to make such a scandalous noise there. There were frequent complaints of him from the Clerks, to whom, especially the Chanter, he used to be very cross, in not playing Services as they were willing and able to sing, but out of a thwarting humour would play nothing but Canterbury Tune, wherein he minded not the honour of the College, but his own ease and laziness."
Organist of
1639
1664 - 1685/6

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George Frederick Handel Rogers
George Frederick Handel Rogers ... Born 1806. Appointed Vicar Choral, Limerick Cathedral, 1861. Resigned, 1885. Died, 1892.
Organist of
1835 - 1885
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Roland Rogers
1847 - 31st Jul 1927
Roland Rogers was born at West Bromwich, 1847. Resigned the post at Bangor Cathedral, 1892, and became Organist of St. James's, Bangor, and Lecturer in Music at the University College of North Wales. Reappointed Organist of Bangor Cathedral, 1906.
Composer of Cantatas, "Prayer and Praise," "Florabel," and "The Garden," Church Music, Part-songs, Organ pieces.
Organist of
St. Peter's, West Bromwich, 1858;
St. John's, Wolverhampton, 1862
Tettenhall Parish Church, 1867
1871 - 1892
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Thomas Rolfe
Thomas Rolfe No names are available in the Rolls of St. George's Chapel, Windsor, from 1442 until Thomas Rolfe was paid that year 26s. 8d. as a Clerk, 20s. as Master of the Choristers, 13s. 4d. for playing the organ during the whole year, and a further 3s. 4d. for playing ad Missam Beatae Mariae Virginis. This last is an interesting detail, for it shows that the daily Mass of the Virgin was celebrated with music as well as the daily High Mass, and that independent remuneration was given to the Organist for the two Services. The Statutes of 1352 order that our Lady's Mass is to be said "cum nota" (with note) and the precise meaning of this has been the subject of different opinions. But this entry in the Windsor Rolls provides clear evidence that the phrase does denote a musical rendering, though of a less elaborate character than that employed at the High Mass.
In the 1463 Rolfe received 13s. 4d. for playing the organ in choro, meaning at High Mass, and 3s. 4d. for playing ad missam Beatae Mariae Virginis. Rolfe probably held office as Organist continuously till the year 1468-9.
Extract:- Organists And Masters Of The Choristers Of St. George's Chapel by E.H. Fellowes

Organist of
1461-69 & 1470-84
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Cyril Bradley Rootham
5th Oct 1875 - 18th Mar 1938
Cyril Bradley Rootham was the son of D. W. Rootham, the Conductor for many years of the Bristol Madrigal Society.
Born at Bristol, October 5, 1875. Pupil of W. F. Trimnell and Cedric Bucknall, at Clifton College, and afterwards student of the Royal College of Music under Sir Charles Stanford and Sir Walter Parratt. Organist successively of Christ Church, Hampstead, 1898; St. Asaph Cathedral, 1901 ; and St. John's College, Cambridge, 1901. Composer of an Ode, a Ballad for baritone, a Cantata, "Andromeda," Church Music, Part-songs, Organ pieces, Songs,
In 1939 broadcast on National radio.
Organist of
Christ Church, Hampstead, 1898
1901
1901
Cyril Bradley Rootham Cyril Bradley Rootham
Cyril Bradley Rootham
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Logo, Newspaper article COMPOSER’S DEATH
Unfinished Symphony to be Completed Friend
An unfinished symphony left by Dr. Cyril Bradley Rootham, the 62-years old composer, who died at his home at Cambridge yesterday from pneumonia, will be completed by Dr. Patrick Hadley, his friend and former pupil.
Dr. Rootham had been working on the composition of his second symphony for two years, but latterly his hands had failed him and he dictated the work to his pupils. The sketch is finished, but part of the scoring is incomplete. Dr. Rootham left it with Dr. Hadley for the instrumentation for orchestra to be completed.
The composer’s works were frequently broadcast by the B.B.C. one, "Brown Earth," a fortnight ago.
He was University lecturer in form and analysis of music from 1913-18, and conductor of the University Musical Society for 14 years until 1936. He had been Fellow since 1914, and organist since 1901, of St. John’s College, Cambridge.
Formerly organist at St. Asaph Cathedral, Dr. Rootham examined for musical degrees at Cambridge University and conducted performances of works in the Cambridge Theatre between 1911 and 1928.

Belfast News-Letter
Saturday 19 March 1938
(www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk)
Edgar Stanley Roper
23rd Dec 1878 - 19th Nov 1953
Edgar Stanley Roper, was born at Croydon, December 23. 1878.
Chorister in Westminster Abbey, 1887.1893. Pupil of Sir Frederick Bridge, 1896-1899. Organ-Scholar of Corpus Christi College, Cambridge, 1899-1903. Studied at Cambridge under Sir Charles Stanford, Dr. Sweeting, and Dr. E. W. Naylor. Stewart of Rannoch Scholar, 1900-1903.Musical Director of Bishopsgate Institute, 1913. Assistant-Organist of Westminster Abbey, 1917. Professor at Trinity College of Music. Conductor of Lothbury and Stock Exchange Male Choirs. Organist and Composer to the Chapel Royal, 1919.
Organist of
St. Paul's, Hammersmith, 1903-1912
Assistant-Organist of the Chapel Royal, 1905-1916
Organist to the Danish Service, Marlborough House, 1909-1919
St. Stephen's, Walbrook, 1912-1919
1919 -

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Logo, Newspaper article New Organist of St James Palace
The King has appointed Mr Edgar Stanley Roper, F. R. C. O., to be organist, choirmaster, and composer at the Chapel Royal, St James's Palace, in room of the late Dr Charles Harford Lloyd

The Scotsman
Saturday 15 November 1919
(www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk)
Logo, Newspaper article Was 50 years organist at Chapels Royal
Dr. Edgar Stanley Roper, former organist, choirmaster and composer at the Chapels Royal died to-day. He would have been 75 next month. He had been critically ill at his home in Streatham Hill, London.
For over SO years he was suborganist or organist at the Chapels Royal, a record unequalled by any of his predecessors, who included Thomas Tails, William Byrd, Henry Purcell, and Orlando Gibbons.
He took part in the Coronation ceremonies of King Edward VII. King George V. and King George VI. He was organist at Westminster Abbey for tie funeral service of the Unknown Warrior, and wrote the special settings for the Te Deum and the Benedictus for the Coronation of King George VI. to whom the work was dedicated.

Belfast Telegraph
Thursday 19 November 1953
(www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk)
Daniel Rosingrave
c.1655 – May 1727
Daniel Rosingrave was a Chorister in the Chapel Royal. Pupil of Henry Purcell and Dr. Blow.
Organist and Stipendiary of Christ Church Cathedral, Dublin, 1698.
Died in Dublin, 1727.
Composer of Church Music.
In 1699 Daniel Rosingrave and Robert Hodge (Master of the Choristers at Christ Church, and predecessor of Rosingrave as Organist of St Patrick's), were ordered to appear before the Dean and Chapter of St. Patrick's for using "very scurrilous language" and for fighting together at a tavern. Rosingrave, as "ye first and chief aggressor," was fined £3, and Hodge 20s. , the former being required to "beg publick pardonv of the latter. At Christ Church, also, Rosingrave was ordered suspension in 1700 for assaulting Thomas Finell, and the Dean and Chapter further ordered "that from henceforth no Vicar or Stipendiary of this Church do wear a sword, under the penalty of expulsion." The suspension order was subsequently annulled by payment of a fine. In 1679, while Organist of Gloucester Cathedral, he had been admonished "for beating and wounding of John Payn, one of the singing men of this Church."

Organist of
1679
1682
1692

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Ralph Rosingrave
- 1747
Ralph Rosingrave Son of Daniel Rosingrave. Appointed a Vicar Choral of St. Patrick's Cathedral, 1719 ; Assistant-Organist there, 1726.
Died 1747.
Two Services, in C and F, and several of his Anthems are in the Dublin Cathedral books. An old organ book formerly in the possession of Mr. J. S. Bumpus contains a Service in F by R. Rosingrave, with a setting of the Benedicite. Ralph Rosingrave was probably the "young Rosingrave" mentioned as being appointed Organist of Trinity College Chapel in 1705.
Organist of
1727 - 1747
1727 - 1747
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John Bernard Sale
1779 - 16th Sep 1856
John Bernard Sale was born at Windsor, 1779. Chorister in St. George's Chapel, Windsor, and in Eton College. Lay Vicar of Westminster Abbey, 1800. Gentleman of the Chapel Royal, 1803. Instructor in Music to H.M. the Queen.
Died in London, September 16, 1856.
Editor of "Psalms and Hymns for the Service of the Church," Glees, Songs, Etc.
Organist of
St. Margaret's, Westminster, 1809
1838 - 1856
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(Listed under his father)
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Logo, Newspaper article DEATHS
On the 16th inst., at 21, Holywell-street, Millbank, in the 78th year of his age, John Bernard Sale, Esq., formerly musical instructor to her Majesty.

Northampton Mercury
Saturday 20 September 1856
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Bertram Luard-Selby
12th Feb 1853 - 26th Dec 1918
Bertram Luard-Selby was born at Ightham, Kent, February 12, 1853. Studied at the Leipzig Conservatorium under
ReineckeCarl Reinecke
Carl Reinecke
23 Jun 1824 – 10 Mar 1910
A German composer, conductor, and pianist in the Middle Romantic Era.
and
Jadassohn Salomon Jadassohn
Salomon Jadassohn
13 Aug 1831 – 1 Feb 1902
German pianist, composer and a renowned teacher of piano and composition at the Leipzig Conservatory.
. Director of Music at Bradfield College, Berks, 1916.
Died December 26, 1918.
Composer of Operas, Church Music, Orchestral Music, Chamber Music, Organ pieces, Part-songs, Pianoforte pieces, Songs, Chamber Music, Etc.
Organist of
St. Barnabas, Marylebone 1876
Highgate School, 1876
1881 - 1883
St, John's, Torquay, 1884
St. Barnabas, Pimlico, 1887
St. Andrew's, Willesden Green
All Saints', Norfolk Square
1900 - 1916
Bertram Luard-Selby Bertram Luard-Selby
Bertram Luard-Selby
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Logo, Newspaper article Deaths
It will be learnt with regret that Mr. Bertram Luard Selby, who was formerly organist of Rochester Cathedral, died onBoxing Day in his sixty-sixth year, at Winterton Vicarage, Lincolnshire

Kent & Sussex Courier
Friday 03 January 1919
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William Sexton
1764 - 1824
William Sexton was born 1764. Chorister in St. George's Chapel, Windsor, and in Eton College. Pupil of Edward Webb. For some years Assistant-Organist of St. George's Chapel. Organist, Sub-Precentor, and Master of the Choristers, of St. George's Chapel 1801
Died 1824.
Composer of Church Music, Glees, Songs, Etc.
Organist of
1801 - 1824

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Alexander Shaw
Alexander Shaw
Composer of Services in G and E minor, and two Anthems in the Cathedral books.
Extract from an Organ book at Durham: "Prick'd by Alexr Shaw, Orgt.—Mr. Alexr Shaw was paid to pricking thus far, Oct. 30, 1678 (and again), 1679, by me, Thos. Smith, Treasurer."
Organist of
1677 - 1681
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John Sheppard
John Sheppard
Instructor of the Choristers at Magdalen College and probably also Organist. Fellow, 1549-1551. Chorister in St. Paul's Cathedral under Thomas Mulliner. He appears to have supplicated, as a "student of music for the space of twenty years," for the degree of Mus.D., but it is not known whether he was admitted. Admonished three times by his College for offences "contra formam statuti." One of these was entrapping and carrying away a chorister from Malmesbury without the Kings license for so doing. He was a Gentleman of the Chapel Royal under Queen Mary. His music, some of which is preserved in MS., is mentioned by Hawkins, Burney, and Morley ("Introduction"). The words of some of his Anthems appeared in Clifford's Collection. An Anthem by him, "I give you a new Commandment," was printed in "The Parish Choir" (1848).
Organist of
1542 - 1554
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Degrees logo1554.
Mus. Doc.—John Shepeard, or Sheppard, who had been a student of music at Oxford for twenty years, and had composed many Cantiones. His grace was granted, but it does not seem that he took the degree, for in the succeeding year he is mentioned in official documents without the title of Doctor. Grove's Dictionary makes him a Mus. Bac., but in his supplication for the degree of Mus. Doc. he is called simply "studiosus musices." He was Organist, Choirmaster, and Fellow of Magdalen College. Morley includes him among famous Englishmen. Burney and Hawkins give specimens of his compositions, of which a considerable number is extant in Day's "Morning and Evening Prayer," 1560 ; "Whole book of Psalms," 1563 ; in the Music School at Oxford, in the British Museum, and the Library of the Royal College of Music.
Extract: A short historical account of the degrees in music at Oxford and Cambridge.
(Williams, C. F. Abdy)
William Shrubsole
1760 - 18th Jan 1806
William Shrubsole wasd born at Canterbury, 1760.
Chorister in Canterbury Cathedral.
Dismissed from Bangor Cathedral in 1784 for "frequenting Conventicles." † Appointed the same year Organist of Spa Fields Chapel, Clerkenwell, London.
Died in London, January 18, 1806. Buried in Bunhill Fields, Finsbury.
Composer of the tune
"Miles Lane,"Richard Shireby plays the 1877 Conacher tracker pipe organ in the workshop of Ireland-Shireby
which is generally associated with Perronet's Hymn "All hail the power of Jesu's Name." The first strain of this tune was cut upon his
tombstoneShrubsole tombstone
, in 1892, when it was restored, at the instigation of the late F. G. Edwards, who collected subscriptions for that purpose.
Within a month of his appointment at Bangor, he performed his duties in a manner so satisfactory and promising that the Chapter thought proper for his encouragement to allow him £8 8s. towards the expense of his journey and the removal of his harpsichord and other effects from London to Bangor.
a secret or unlawful religious meeting, typically of nonconformists
Organist of
1782 - 1784

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John Silver
John Silver had been Master of the Choristers of Winchester Cathedral since 1638, and was appointed Organist at the Restoration. From this time the offices of Master of the Choristers and Organist were combined. The MS. parts of a Service in F and two Anthems by him were in the possession of the late J. S. Bumpus.
The Survey of Houses in the Cathedral Close, July, 1649, includes the following :-—
"A Howse in the possession of one Mr. Silver, formerly Organist of the Cathedrall Church, and did hold the same in right of his place. The said Howse consistinge of three chambers and three small roomes, all above staires, valued at Forty Shillings p. ann. (Etc.)"
From this it would appear that John Silver had also been Organist before the period of the Rebellion. Probably he undertook the duties of this office from the time Gibbons joined the Royalist Army until the Cathedral Services were suspended in the Autumn of 1645. The name of John Silver also occurs in the records of Dulwich College (1627-1631), and Wimborne Minster (in 1663), as Organist. It cannot be ascertained, however, whether all the appointments above-mentioned were held by the same person.
Organist of
?1627
1661 - (?)1666
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George Robertson Sinclair
28th Oct 1862 - 7th Feb 1917
George Robertson Sinclair, was born at Croydon, October 28, 1862.
Student at the Royal Irish Academy of Music. Chorister in, and afterwards Assistant-Organist at, St. Michael's College, Tenbury. Pupil of Dr. C. Harford Lloyd, and Assistant-Organist of Gloucester Cathedral. Conductor of the Hereford Festivals, Hereford Choral Society, Hereford Orchestral Society, Birmingham Festival Choral Society, Etc.
Died suddenly at Birmingham, February 7, 1917.
Composer of Church Music, Etc.
The new organ in Truro Cathedral, by Willis, was built under Dr. Sinclair's direction; and during his appointment at Hereford the sum of £2,300 was raised through his energy, and the Cathedral organ rebuilt (also by Willis) from his specification.
Organist of
St. Mary-le-Crypt, Gloucester, 1879
1881
George Robertson Sinclair George Robertson Sinclair
George Robertson Sinclair
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Logo, Newspaper article SUDDEN DEATH OF DR. SINCLAIR. OBGANIST OF HEREFORD CATHEDRAL
Dr. George Robertson Sinclair. Mus. Doc., Hon. F.R.C.0.. Hon. R.A.M., L.R.A.M.. organist of Hereford Cathedral and conductor Birmingham Festival Society, died suddenly at Birmingham on Wednesday night. He conducted a rehearsal in the city, and afterwards went to his hotel, where, at 11.30, he was found in his bedroom in state of collapse. "Medical assistance was summoned, but death took place before the doctor arrived. Dr. Sinclair, who was54years of age, was well known in English musical circles, Born at Croydon in 1863, and educated atSt. Michael's College, Tenbury, of which was honorary fellow.Dr. Sinclair studiedmusic under Sir F. Ouseley. Sir Robert Stewart, and Dr. C. H. Lloyd. He was assistant organist at Gloucester Cathedral, and organist and choirmaster St. Mary de Crypt Church, Gloucester (1880); and at the age 17 was appointed organist and choirmaster of Truro Cathedral. As conductor of the Three Choirs Festivals at Hereford Cathedral, where went in 1889, Dr. Sinclair is best known to music lovers in this part the country. He filled this role during the time he was at Hereford eight, times, viz., 1891-4-7, 1900-3-6-9-12. The fact of his appointment as conductor to the Birmingham Festival Choral is sufficient testimony to the esteem in which he was held in the larger world of music. He also conducted the Hereford Choral Society, the Herefordshire Orchestral Society, the Diocesan Choral Union, and the Ross Musical Society; was Grand Organist to the Freemasons' Grand Lodge of England; Grand Organist to the Grand Lodge of Mark Master Masons (1903) and Grand Organist to the Supremo Grand Chapter of the Royal Arch (1909). In music his tastes were catholic, and his abilities both as an executant and conductor of a high order; he was also a composer of merit. In his leisure hours he hobbied in motor-cycling and photography. His death will be much regretted in the musical world .

Cheltenham Chronicle
Saturday 10 February 1917
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Highmore Skeats (Senr.)
1760 - 29th Jun 1831
Highmore Skeats (Senr.) was born 1760. Chorister in Exeter Cathedral. Vicar Choral of Salisbury Cathedral.
Died at Canterbury, June 29, 1831. Buried in St. Martin's Churchyard.
Composer of Church Music (including a Complete Morning and Evening Service in C, in triple time throughout), Glees, Songs, Etc. Editor of Dr. J. Stephens's Cathedral Music and of a Collection of Songs. His Anthem, "The righteous souls that take their flight," is included in a Collection of Short Anthems by Dr. Longhurst, and has been sung at the burial of several of the Canons, Etc., of Canterbury. In 1825 (or 1826) James Longhurst, father of Dr. W. H. Longhurst, added "German pedals" to the old organ, then standing on the Rood Screen, and supplied the instrument with seven 16-ft. pedal pipes. These "German pedals" were supposed to have been the first examples of their kind introduced into Kent. Skeats, then Organist, had a great aversion to them, and would not use them. When anybody wished to hear the pedal pipes he would call his pupil, Jones, saying: "Here, Jones, come and show these things off, I never learned to dance."
Organist of
, 1778-1803.
1803 - 1831
Highmore Skeats (Senr.) Highmore Skeats (Senr.)
Highmore Skeats (Senr.)
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Highmore Skeats (Junr.)
1786 - 24th Feb 1835
Highmore Skeats (Junr.) Son of the above was born at Canterbury, 1786. Presumably a pupil of his father, whom he succeeded as Organist of Ely Cathedral.
Died at Windsor, February 24, 1835. Buried in the Cloisters of St. George's Chapel.
Composer of Church Music.
Organist of
1804 - 1830
1830 - 1835
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George Skelton
George Skelton Son of George Skelton, a blacksmith of Lincoln. Admitted a Burghersh Chanter in Lincoln Cathedral, 1782 ; Chorister, 1785. Succeeded Hasted as Organist of Lincoln Cathedral, 1794. Resigned 1850. His son, G. J. Skelton (with whom he resided after his retirement), was Organist of Holy Trimty Church, Hull, and composer of the once well known Chant Service—Skelton in D.
Organist of
1850 - 1794
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George Thomas Smart
10th May 1776 - 23rd Feb 1867
Sir George Thomas Smart, was born in London, May 10, 1776. Chorister in the Chapel Royal. Pupil of Dupuis and Ayrton.
Knighted at Dublin, 1811.
Conductor of the Philharmonic Society, 1813-1844.
Composer to the Chapel Royal, 1838.
Conductor of the principal Musical Festivals of the time.
Died at 12, Bedford Square, London, February 23, 1867. Buried in the catacombs, Kensal Green Cemetery.
Composer of Church Music, Glees, Sonatinas for the Pianoforte. Editor of a Collection of Madrigals, Etc.
Organist of
St. James's Chapel, Hampstead Road, 1791
1822 - 1867
George Thomas Smart George Thomas Smart
George Thomas Smart

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Logo, Newspaper article Public Notice
Sir George Thomas Smart, the veteran organist of the Chapel Royal, St. James's, died in London on Saturday, in his 92nd year.
He was born in 1776, was knighted in 1811, and was for many years an eminent and successful teacher of music He succeeded Mr. Charles vett, as organist of the Chapel Royal in 1822. on the nomination of the late Archbishop of Canterbury (Howley) when Bishop of London and Dean of the Chapels Royal.
Sir George directed the music at the coronations of King William IV. and Queen Victoria, and, as a conductor, had directed above 1020 oratorios.
Weber was an intimate friend of his, and lived for a long time at his house; and Jenny Lind studied the "Messiah" with him preparatory to her first memorable appearance in English oratorio.

Birmingham Journal
Saturday 02 March 1867
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George Townshend Smith
14th Nov 1813 - 3rd Aug 1877
George Townshend Smith was the son of Edward Smith, a Lay Clerk of St. George's Chapel, Windsor.
He was born at Windsor, November 14, 1813.
Chorister in St. George's Chapel, Windsor, under Skeats. Pupil of Dr. S. S. Wesley.
Succeeded J. Hunt, at Hereford Cathedral. 1843. Conductor and Hon. Secretary of the Hereford Festivals.
Died suddenly, August 3, 1877.
There is a
stained glass window THE TOWNSHEND SMITH MEMORIAL
We learn from the Hereford Times that the memorial to the late George Townshend Smith, for 34 years the accomplished organist of Hereford Cathedral, and one of the most genial men that ever lived, has taken the form of a window, which has been fixed in the clerestory of the north transept.
The originally proposed idea of a mural tablet of incised marbles was given up in a ccordance with the wishes of the Dean and Chapter.
The window consists of seven circles, arranged to form a rose-shaped design. The central circle is two feet in diameter; each of the smaller circles is about one foot in diameter. The subject of the central circle is that of David playing on the harp. This circle also contains the words "David Rex," let in on the left side of the figure. The smaller circles contain each an angel figure playing upon a stringed instrument, varied for each circle. In these circles also occur the words "Alleluia" and "Holy, Holy, Holy." In a border surrounding the central circle is contained the inscripion—"George Townshend Smith, ob. Aug., 1877, ret 63." The prevailing colours are Prussian blue, ruby, orange, and white. "The great height of the window caused, many to express a doubt whether the colours and figures would be seen at all, but now that the memorial is erected, surprise has been expressed at the beauty of the colouring arid clearness of outline of the subjects at a height of 62 feet from the floor. This reflects great credit upon the artists, Messrs Clayton and Bell, of Regent street, London, and shows that the position of the window was carefully borne in mind in preparing the design and colours. The work of fixing the glass in the cathedral has been carefully carried out under the superintendence of Mr. Hobart Clarke, sculptor, of Portland-street, Hereford. The window has a rich and artistic appearance, and is conidered to be an ornament to the spot where it is placed.
The thanks of the subscribers are due to the Dean and Chapter for having granted them so visible and favourable a site.
An ornamental brass had previously been placed on the south wall near the back of the organ by the widow and daugh-tors of the demised.

Windsor and Eton Express
Saturday 05 November 1881
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to his memory in the Cathedral. Composer of Church Music. A Jubilate by him was written expressly for and performed at the Hereford Festival of 1855 ; and an Anthem, "O how amiable," was composed for and produced at the re-opening Service at Hereford Cathedral, after its restoration.
Organist of
Old Parish Church, Eastbourne;
St. Margaret's, Lynn;
1843 - 1877
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John Stafford Smith
1750 - 21st Sep 1836
John Stafford Smith was the son of Martin Smith, Organist of Gloucester Cathedral.
Born at Gloucester, 1750. Pupil of his father, and afterwards of Dr. Boyce.
Gentleman of the Chapel Royal, 1784. Organist at the Gloucester Festival of 1790. Lay Clerk of Westminster Abbey, 1794.Master of the Children at Chapel Royal and "Lutenist," 1805 until 1817.
Died September 21, 1836.
Composer of Church Music, Glees, Etc.
Editor of "Musica Antiqua," Songs, Etc.
Smith greatly assisted Hawkins in the compilation of his "History of Music," by lending him old and rare MSS., of which he possessed a large and interesting collection. His extensive and valuable Musical Library was sold by auction in 1844.
Organist of
1802 - 1836
John Stafford Smith John Stafford Smith
John Stafford Smith

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Logo, Newspaper article Composed Tune Of U.S. Anthem
Somewhere about 1780 John Stafford Smith wrote "The Anacreoutic Song" for a Society with that name London. Some years later an American wrote words fit the tune and it became "The Star Spangled Banner", the national anthem of the U.S.A.
John Stafford Smith, born in and educated in Gloucesterwas the second son Martin Smith, organist of Gloucester Cathedral.
Next year marks the bi-centennary of John Stafford Smith's birth and a move being considered mark it In suitable fashion Gloucester.

Gloucester Journal
Saturday 01 October 1949
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Martin Smith
Martin Smith Father of John Stafford Smith, master of the Children and organist of the Chapel Royal.
The words of Anthems by him are included in Marshall's Collection.
Organist of
1782 - 1740
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Edward Smyth
Edward Smyth was the son of William Smyth.
Died 1611.
Composer also of Anthems and Responses in the Durham Cathedral books.
His name appears as one of the composers in Clifford's Words of Anthems.
Organist of
1609 - 1611
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Charles Frederick South
6th Feb 1850 - 12th Aug 1866
Charles Frederick South was born in London, February 6, 1850.
Pupil Of his brother, H. J. South, and George Cooper, occasionally deputising for the latter at St. Paul's Cathedral.
Conductor for a few years of the Sarum Choral Society.
Died August 12, 1916.
Composer of Church Music.
Organist of
Aske's Hospital, Hoxton, 1866
St. Augustine and St. Faith, E.C., 1868
1883 - 1916

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Mr Charles Frederick South, organist of Salisbury Cathedral, has died nis residence, The Close, Salisbury, at the age of sixty-six. He had held the position over 32 years, being appointed in January, 1884.

Dundee Evening Telegraph
Monday 14 August 1916
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John Speechly
1811 - 7th Aug 1869
John Speechly was born at Peterborough, 1811.
Died August 7, 1869. He is buried in the South Choir Aisle of Peterborough Cathedral, where there is a tablet to his memory.
Organist of
St. John's Church, Peterborough
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Reginald Spofforth
1769 - 8th Sep 1827
Reginald Spofforth, the glee writer, is said to have been Organist of Lincoln Cathedral, and to have resigned in 1789 but this is obviously wrong. He acted for a short time, however, as Deputy-Organist.
Organist of
?

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Samuel Spofforth
1780 - 6th Jun 1864
Samuel Spofforth was the younger brother of Reginald Spofforth, the Glee writer.
Born 1780.
Pupil of his uncle, Thomas Spofforth, of Southwell. Chorister in Southwell Minster.
Died 1864. Buried in the Cathedral Close, Lichfield.
His Double Chant in G was once a favourite.
Organist of
, 1799
, 1807 - 1864
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Logo, Newspaper article DEATHS
June 6th, Mr. Samuel Spofforth, aged 84 upwards cf thirty seven years organist of the Cathedrsl Lichfield

Sheffield Independent
Friday 17 June 1864
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Thomas Spofforth
1742 - 16th May 1826
Thomas Spofforth was born 1742. Uncle and Musical Instructor of Reginald Spofforth and of Samuel Spofforth.
Retired on a pension, 1818.
Died May 16, 1826. Buried in the South Transept of Southwell Cathedral, to which he was a considerable benefactor.
A Double Chant in F by him was inserted in Cleland's Bath Collection in 1823.
Organist of

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Sir John Stainer
Sir John Stainer was born in London, June 6, 1840.
Chorister in St. Paul's. Pupil of W. Bayley, Dr. Steggall, and George Cooper. Organist to the (Royal) Albert Hall Choral Society, 1873-1888.
Musical Juror at the Paris Exhibition, 1878. Chevalier of the Legion of Honour of France, 1878. Principal Of National Training School for Music, 1881-82. Appointed H.M. Inspector of Music in Schools, 1882. Resigned his post at St. Paul's in consequence of failing eyesight, 1888. Knighted 1888. Honorary Fellow of Magdalen College. Professor of Music in the University of Oxford, 1889. Resigned the latter post May, 1899. President of the Musical Association, 1899. Master of the Musicians' Company, 1900.
Died at Verona, March 31, 1901. Buried in Holywell Cemetery, Oxford.
Composer of an Oratorio, "Gideon," Cantatas, Services, Anthems, and other Church Music, Organ Music, Songs, Part-songs, Etc. Author of "The Music of the Bible" and of works on Harmony, Composition, the Organ, Vocalization, Etc. Joint author, with Dr. W. A. Barrett, of a "Dictionary of Musical Terms."
Editor and arranger. Lecturer on various musical subjects.
Organist of
St. Benet and St. Peter, Paul's Wharf, 1855
, 1857
, 1859
University of Oxford, 1860
, 1872 - 1888
Sir John Stainer Sir John Stainer
Sir John Stainer

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Degrees logo1859
Mus. Bac. — John Stainer, Christ Church. B.A., 1863 ; M.A., 1866; Mus. Doc., 1865 ; Knighted, 1888; Professor of Music, in succession to Sir F. A. G. Ouseley, 1889.
Extract: A short historical account of the degrees in music at Oxford and Cambridge.
(Williams, C. F. Abdy)

Logo, Newspaper article DEATH OF SIR JOHN STAINER.
News was received in Oxford on Monday of the death of Sir John Stainer at Verona.
He was taking a tour on the Continent, and his death, it is believed, was sudden.
Sir John Stainer will be best remembered, perhaps, as awriter of church music. He was an enthusiastic disciple of Dykes, and believed, as Dykes did, in the great educating influence of fine words accompanied by fine music. He held that the words of a hymn well set mean far more to the singer or hearer, and influence him far more than the same words, however beautiful, set to indifferent music. He did not claim to be, nor was he, as great a composer of hymn-music as was Dykes, but his methods were the same, and occasionally he achieved almost equally beautiful results. The difference between master and disciple in this Connection is well illustrated by their settings of the funeral hymn, "Now the labourer's task is o'er." Stainer's setting, though fine in many respects, does not approach the beauty and solemnity of his master's music.
His anthems and services are too numerous to mention: they are well known to every churchgoer. Of his longer works, perhaps his oratorio, "The Crucifixion," is best known—an exquisitely beautiful piece of music which has become very familiar to Londoners by reason of its annual performance in Marylebone Parish Church and elsewhere during the season of Lent. His cantatas, "The Daughter of Jairus," which was performed at the Worcester Festival in 1878, and "St. Mary Magdalen," which was performed at Gloucester in 1883, are not so well known. Of all his music, however, the shortest piece he wrote is undoubtedly that which is sung most often, perhaps no piece of music is likely be sung more often. is the "Sevenfold Amen" a few bars of music in which for beauty and simplicity the cadences are unsurpassed in church music. Sir John was born in 1840. and was the son of a schoolmaster in Southwark; he was a chorister at St. Paul's between 1847 and 1856.
At the age of sixteen he became organist to St. Michael's College, Tenbury. then recently founded the late Sir F. G. Ouseley; and at the early age of nineteen he was made organist of Magdalen College, Oxford. He seized the opportunity of graduating in arts well as in music, proceeding to Mus. Bac. in 1859, B.A. in 1363, Mus. Doc. 1855, M.A. 1855. In 1850 Dr. Stainer had been appointed organist of the University Church by the then Vice-Chancellor, Dr. Jeune, some time Bishop of Peterborough, and he held this appointment, together with the of Magdalen, until 1372, when was appointed to succeed Sir John Goss as organist of St. Paul's Cathedral, which post he resigned early in 1888. In 1373 was nominated by his Royal Highness the Prince of Wales as one of the jurors of the Exhibition in Paris, and when was closed he was made a Chevalier of the Legion of Honour.
In 1828 Dr. Stainer was appointed Inspector of Music on the Education Department, in the place of the late Dr. Huilah, and also had the honour of being nominated member of the Council of the Royal College of Music by the Prince of Wales. 1885 Dr. Stainer received the degree of Doc., and in 1885 that of D.C.L., honoris causa, from the University of Durham. In 1833 he received the honour of knighthood, and in was appointed Professor of Music to the University of Oxford, as successor to Sir F. G. Ouseley, deceased.
He was an honorary member of the Royal Academy of Music, one of the vice-presidents of the Royal College of Organists, and president of the Musical Association.
In 1893 he received the distinction of being elected an Honorary Fellow of Magdalen College, Oxon. In July, 1899, he was entertained at dinner by the Dean and Chapter of St. Paul's, to commemorate the completion of the fiftieth year of his association with the cathedral. Sir John was well known to music lovers in Birmingham. So recently as Februaiy he was chosen by the Birmingham Clef Club to become their president in succession to the late Sir Arthur Sullivan, and the members looked forward to a visit from him on the occasion of the forthcoming annual meeting. The only visit in connection with the performance of his works was made to the Midland Institute about fifteen years ago, when he lectured upon "Christinas' Carols," and the Madrigal Society, of which Mr. Stockley was conductor, sang several of his compositions. Other visits were to Saltley College in the discharge of his duties as musical examiner. Several churches have included his "Crucifixion" in their choral programme for Good Friday.

Lichfield Mercury
Friday 05 April 1901
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Charles Villiers Stanford
30th Sep 1852 - 29th Mar 1924
Charles Villiers Stanford was born in Dublin, September 30, 1852.
Pupil of Arthur O'Leary and Sir Robert Stewart, and afterwards of Reinecke and F. Kiel.
Matriculated at Cambridge University, and, in 1873, succeeded Dr. J. L. Hopkins as Organist of Trinity College, Cambridge. For some years Conductor of the Cambridge Amateur Vocal Guild and Cambridge University Musical Society.
Professor of Composition and Conductor of the Orchestra at the Royal College of Music since its opening in 1883. Conductor of the Bach Choir, 1885. University Professor of Music at Cambridge, 1887. Resigned the post of Organist of Trinity College, Cambridge, 1892, and removed to London.
Elected Corresponding Member of the Société des Compositeurs de Musique, Paris, 1892. Conductor of Leeds Philharmonic Society, 1897. Knighted, 1901. Composer of Oratorios, Operas, Cantatas, Odes, Incidental Music to Plays, Church Music, Orchestral Music, Chamber Music, Organ pieces, Songs, Pianoforte pieces, Etc. Editor of Irish Melodies. Writer and Lecturer on Music, Etc.
Organist of
1873 - 1892
Charles Villiers Stanford Charles Villiers Stanford
Charles Villiers Stanford

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Degrees logo1893
Mus. Doc., by Grace of the Senate.— CharIes Villiers Stanford.
Trinity Coll. B.A., 1874 ; M.A., 1877 ; Mus. Doc. , Oxon., 1883 ; Professor of Music, 1887.
Extract: A short historical account of the degrees in music at Oxford and Cambridge.
(Williams, C. F. Abdy)

Logo, Newspaper article SIR CHAS. STANFORD, DEATH OF EMINENT COMPOSER
By the death of Sir Charles Villiers Stanford, in London, on Saturday, the musical world has suffered its third great loss within a fortnight, Sir Frederick Bridge and Sir Walter Parratt having both also passed away during that period.
In these the Royal College Music has lost three of the very small remaining band of professors who have been on its staff sinfce its foundation in 1883. Sir Charles Stanford, who was in his 72nd year, had been connected with music during the whole of his life. At the age of eight he composed a march. At 18, he went to Cambridge as choral scholar at Queens', and at 21 became organist of Trinity. A year later became conducfor of the University Musical Society, which, in his hands achieved great importance, giving the first, English performance of several important works of contemporary foreign composers, such as Brahms, of whom Stanford was a great admirer. The public first heard of Sir Charles as a composer in 1876, when he composed the music for the Lyceum production of Tennyson's "Queen Mary" A close friendship followed until Ternyson's death, and Stanford also wrote the settings "The Revenge" and the Wellington "Ode." Sir Charles was the composer of numerous orchestral pieces and a very large selectionof chamber music, and, in addition a large amount incidental music for plays, he wrote nine operas. His choral pieces have been produced atmost of the big festivals, and he was noted as a choral conductor, in which he acted for some time at the Leeds Festival. He will also be remembered for his songs, notably his "Songs the Sea." As Professor of Music at Cambridge and senior teacher of composition at the Royal College of Music, he had as pupils many composers whose names are now prominentin this country. He was the author ofseveral books dealing with various aspects of the musician's art.

Western Morning News
Monday 31 March 1924


WILL
Sir Charles Villiers Stanford, for many years Professor of Music at the University Cambridge and at the Royal College Music, London, left £5328.

Aberdeen Press and Journal
Monday 28 April 1924
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Charles John Stanley
17th Jan 1712 - 19th May 1786
Charles John Stanley was a famous blind Organist.
Born in London, January 17, 1713.
Became blind from an accident when about two years old. Pupil of John Reading and Dr. Greene. Succeeded Dr. Boyce as Master of the Royal Band of Music, 1779.
Died in London, May 19, 1786.
Composer of three Oratorios, Church Music, Cantatas, Songs, Concertos, Etc., for Strings, Organ Voluntaries, Concertos for Harpsichord or Organ, Etc.
Organist of
All Hallows', Bread Street, 1724
St. Andrew's, Holborn. 1726;
1734 - 1786
Charles John Stanley Charles John Stanley
Charles John Stanley

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Degrees logo1729
Mus. Bac.—John Stanley. Born in 1713, he became blind at two years of age from an accident. He was a pupil of John Reading and Maurice Greene, and in 1724 was appointed Organist of All Hallows', Bread Street, and, two years later, of St. Andrew's, Holborn. In 1739 he was appointed Organist of the Temple Church. He composed and produced the following Oratorios: "Jephthah," in 1757 ; "Zimri," 1760 ; and the "Fall of Egypt," 1774. He assisted in carrying on the Oratorio performances formerly conducted by Handel. In 1779 he succeeded Boyce as Master of the King's Band. He died in 1786. His compositions, besides those already mentioned, consist of six cantatas, for voice and instrument, three cantatas and three songs, three sets of organ voluntaries, and "Arcadia," a dramatic pastoral in honour of the marriage of George Ill.
Extract: A short historical account of the degrees in music at Oxford and Cambridge.
(Williams, C. F. Abdy)
Heathcote Dicken Statham
7th Dec 1889 - 29th Oct 1973
Heathcote Dicken Statham was a Chorister in St. Michael's College, Tenbury, 1900.
Mus. Scholar, Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge, 1908. Scholar of Royal College of Music, 1912.
Organist of
Calcutta Cathedral, 1913
1920 -
Heathcote Dicken Statham Heathcote Dicken Statham
Heathcote Dicken Statham

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Extract: A short historical account of the degrees in music at Oxford and Cambridge.
(Williams, C. F. Abdy)

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James Brealsford Stephens
? - 3rd Mar 1860
James Brealsford Stephens was master of the boys at Cork Cathedral
Died March 3, 1860.
Organist of
1811 - 1860
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John Stephens
? - 15th Dec 1805
John Stephens was a Chorister in Gloucester Cathedral.
He conducted the Gloucester Festival of 1766.
Died at Salisbury, December 15, 1780.
Buried in the Salisbury Cathedral, North Aisle of Nave.
A volume of his Church Music was issued in 1805, edited by Highmore Skeats, Senr.
He composed one of the four melodies still to be heard on the Gloucester Cathedral chimes.
Organist of
1746 - 1780?
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Degrees logo1763.
Mus. Doc.—John Stephens.
Was a chorister in Gloucester Cathedral, and succeeded Edward Thomson, as Organist Of Salisbury, in 1746. He conducted the Gloucester Festival in 1766. He died in 1780. A volume of his Cathedral Music was published in 1805, edited by Highmore Skeats.
Extract: A short historical account of the degrees in music at Oxford and Cambridge.
(Williams, C. F. Abdy)
Edwin Stephenson
1871–1922
Edwin Stephenson was born at Windermere, 1871.
A pupil of Dr. E. Brown of Barrow-in-Furness, and afterwards of Sir Walter Parratt, Dr. C. H. Lloyd, and others at the Royal College of Music.
Organist of
Priory Church, Cartmel, 1888
Sunningdale Parish Church, 1891
St. Michael's, Brighton, 1901
Brighton Parish Church, 1905
1906 -1914
St. Margaret's, Westminster, 1914 - 1922

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Mr. Edwin Stephenson, organist St. Margaret's, Westminster, whose death has taken place at Ulverston, was for some time organist the Parish Church Brighton. He was appointed Canon Carnegie to the Cathedral Church at Birmingham, in 1914 he succeeded Mr Goss-Custard as organist of St. Margaret's, and has played many notable services during and since the war. His organ recitals were much appreciated by the public.

Yorkshire Post and Leeds Intelligencer - Tuesday 26 September 1922
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Richard John Samuel Stevens
27th Mar 1757 - 23rd Sep 1837
Richard John Samuel Stevens was Born in London, March 27, 1757.
Chorister in St. Paul's Cathedral.
Gresham Professor of Music, 1801.
Resigned the Organistship of the Temple Church, March 25, 1810.
Died at Peckham, September 23, 1837.
Composer of Glees, Songs, Etc. Compiler of a selection of Sacred Music.
Organist of
1786 - 1810
Charterhouse, 1796

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Robert Stevenson
Robert Stevenson supplicated for a degree at Oxford in 1583, stating that he had been thirty- three years a student. Was granted the degree of Mus.B. in 1587 and of Mus.D. in 1596.
An Anthem, "When the Lord turned again," in the Library of Peterhouse, Cambridge, may have been his Degree exercise. In the Treasurer's Accounts are several entries of payments to him for copying music into the singing books.
Organist of
1570 1599
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Degrees logo1587.
Mus. Bac.—.Robert Stephenson, or Stevenson,
who was thirty-three years a student, and had supplicated in 1583.
He took the degree of Mus. Doc., 1596.
Extract: A short historical account of the degrees in music at Oxford and Cambridge.
(Williams, C. F. Abdy)
Charles Hylton Stewart

Organist of
Sep 1932 - Nov 1932

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Extract: A short historical account of the degrees in music at Oxford and Cambridge.
(Williams, C. F. Abdy)

Logo, Newspaper article DEATH
"The Times" announces the death at Windsor at the age of 48, of Mr Charles Hylton Stewart. M.A . Mus. Bac. (Camb ), organist of St George’s Chapel. Windsor Castle. He was appointed to St George’s from Chester Cathedral on the retirement of Sir Walford Davies, and took up his post only September.

Hartlepool Northern Daily Mail
Tuesday 15 November 1932
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Haldane Campbell Stewart
28th Feb 1868 – 14th Jun 1942
Haldane Campbell Stewart was a Chorister in Magdalen College under Mr. (now Sir Walter) Parratt, 1879- 1882.
Classical Exhibitioner of Magdalen College, 1887-1891. Director of Music at Lancing College, 1891-1898 ; ditto at Tonbridge School, 1898- 1919.
Composer of Church Music, Etc.
He played in 75 first-class cricket matches as a batsman.
Organist of
1919 -
Haldane Campbell Stewart Haldane Campbell Stewart
Haldane Campbell Stewart
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Robert Stewart
16th Dec 1825 - 24th Mar 1894
Sir Robert Presscott Stewart was born in Dublin, December 16th 1825.
He was a Chorister in Christ Church Cathedral.
Organist of Christ Church Cathedral and Trinity College Chapel, 1844.
Organist of St. Patrick's Cathedral, 1852. Resigned the post of Organist, St. Patrick's Cathedral, 1861, in order to obtain a Vicar Choralship there, but the latter office was divided, and he only succeeded to one half. He still, however, played the Sunday afternoon services, by arrangement with his successor, Mr. Murphy, who on these occasions sang for Sir Robert in the choir.
Half Vicar Choral of St. Patrick's Cathedral, 1861. Professor of Music in Dublin University, 1862
Knighted 1872.
Died in Dublin, Easter Eve, March 24, 1894.
Composer of Odes, Cantatas, Church Music, Organ pieces, Songs, Glees, Etc.
Editor of and lecturer on music.
Inscription on the Brass placed to his memory in Christ Church Cathedral, Christmas, 1896 :—

To the Glory of God, and in Memory of
ROBERT PRESCOTT STEWART, Knt
Doctor of Music.
Trained as a Chorister in the Cathedral School, he was appointed Organist at the age of eighteen, and continued in that post during fifty years.
His name stands foremost among the many who for seven centuries devoted their musical talents to the Service of God within this Ancient Sanctuary.
Upright in life and modest in spirit, he gained the warm affection of a large circle of friends, and universal honour and respect. A brilliant Organist and Composer, he impressed his genius on the Use and Mode of Services in this Cathedral Church, and enriched its Library with many noble compositions.
Born 1825.
He entered into his Rest on Easter Eve, 1894.
[Here are engraved the opening bars of the Te Deum from Stewart's Service for Double Choir, in E flat.]

A statue, erected to his memory on Leinster Lawn, Dublin, was unveiled by the Lord Lieutenant of Ireland (Earl Cadogan) on March 8, 1898.
Organist of
1852 - 1861
1844 - 1894
Robert Presscott Stewart
Robert Stewart

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James Stimpson
1st Jan 1820 - 3rd Oct 1886
James Stimpson was born at Lincoln, 1820.
Chorister in Durham Cathedral. Articled pupil of Ingham, at Carlisle.
Organist and Chorus-master of Birmingham Festival.
Trained the chorus for the production of Mendelssohn's "Elijah," in 1846.
For many years Professor of Music at the Birmingham Blind Institution.
Died at Birmingham, 1886.
Composer of Songs, Pianoforte pieces, Etc.
Author of a "Manual of the Theory of Music."
Editor of Church and Organ Music, Etc.
Organist of
St. Andrew's, Newcastle on-Tyne, 1836
1841 - 1842
Birmingham Town Hall

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Logo, Newspaper article Obituary.
Mr. James Stimpson, the organist of the Town Hall, Birmingham, died at Edgbaston on Monday. He was a son of a lay-vicar of Lincoln Cathedral, and was born in 1820.

Worcester Journal
Saturday 09 October 1886
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Logo, Newspaper article Death
The death of Mr. James Stimpson, who for forty-four years has been organist at the Birmingham Festival, will carry the memory of musical veterans back to the old days. Mr. Stimpson, then a young man of six-and-twenty, played the organ at the first performance of "Elijah," under Mendelssohn's conductorship, at the Birmingham Festival of 1846.

Truth
Thursday 21 October 1886
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Harold Carpenter Lamb Stocks
1884 - 1956
Harold Carpenter Lamb Stocks was born at Essendon, Herts, 1884.
Pupil of Dr. A. W. Wilson and others.
Assistant-Organist of Ely Cathedral, 1906.
Invalided from Army after active service in Egypt and Salonika, 1916.
Organist of St. Asaph Cathedral, 1917.
Composer of Church Music, Songs, Etc.
Organist of
Littleport Parish Church, 1902
St. Mary's, Ely, 1906
Yeovil Parish Church, 1909
Ludlow Parish Church, 1911
1917 -
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DOO Icon STOCKS, HAROLD CARPENTER LAMB
Ebor House, Ludlow.
Born 1884 at Essenden, Herts.
Trained at Ely Cathedral and private. MUS. BAC. OXON., F.R.C.O.
Organist Littleport Parish Church, 1902-06 ; St. Mary's, Ely, 1906-09 ; (Assistant), Ely Cathedral, 1906-09 ; Yeovil Parish Church, 1909-11 ; Ludlow Parish Church since 1911. Publications : Hymn tunes ; song, "Echoes."
Recreations : Walking and cycling.

Dictionary of Organs and Organists
F.W Thornsby
1921
William Stonard
? - 1630
William Stonard
Composed a Choral Hymn in eight parts for his degree.
Composer also of Church Music, Etc.
Died 1630.
His name is given as one of the composers in Clifford's Words of Anthems.
Organist of
1608 - 1630
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Degrees logo1608.
Mus. Bac.—William Stonard, Organist of Christ Church.
He was required to compose a choral hymn of eight parts for his degree. Some of his compositions are in the Tudway Collection, in Clifford, and in the Music School at Oxford.
The dictionaries of Grove and Brown, following Hawkins, say that he took the Doctor's degree in 1608. There is nothing to show that he ever became a Doctor of Music.
He died 1630.

Extract: A short historical account of the degrees in music at Oxford and Cambridge.
(Williams, C. F. Abdy)
Richard Storey
Richard Storey He was Organist OF Peterborough Cathedral in the time of the Monastery, and continued to hold the office at the Reformation, at a salary of £10 per annum.
Organist of
1541 - ?
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John Stringer
1617 - 1673
John Stringer (Son of the Peter Stringer.)
A Minor Canon. At the request of the Chapter he served also as Treasurer for a short time.
Organist of
1673 - 1686
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Peter Stringer
30th Oct 1617 - 1673
Peter Stringer was born at Chester, October 30, 1617.
Successively Chorister and Conduct ; afterwards simultaneously Minor Canon, Precentor, Organist, and Treasurer.
His name occurs several times in the Accounts in connection with the building of a new organ.
Died 1673.
The words of some of his Anthems are included in Clifford's Collection.
He appears to have been Organist of Manchester Collegiate Church (now the Cathedral) for a short time in 1666, although his salary at Chester continued without a break.
Organist of
1661 - 1673
1666?
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William Sudlow
1772 - 1848
William Sudlow Son of a music dealer in Hanging Ditch, Manchester. Born 1772. Died 1848 Composer of Anthems, Songs, Etc. He was also a Violoncellist.
Organist of
1804 - 1848
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Henry Swarbrick (or Schwarbrook)
- 1754
Henry Swarbrick was Supposed to have been a relative of Thomas Schwarbrook, the organ-builder.
Died 1754.
A Morning Service by him in MS. is at Hereford. In a curious old oblong MS. volume of Chants written on parchment, formerly in the possession of the late J. S. Bumpus, there is a Chant by "Mr. Henry Swarbrick, Organist of Hereford, in E lami."
Organist of
1721 - 1754
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Edward Thomas Sweeting
16th Sep 1863 - 1930
Edward Thomas Sweeting was born at Alsager, Cheshire, September 16, 1863.
Scholar of the National Training School for Music.
Music Master of Rossall School, 1882. Music Master of WinChester College, 1901.
Composer of a Choral Ballad for men's voices, "The Burial of Dundee" a Festal March for Orchestra, Madrigals, Part-songs, Songs, pieces for Violin and Pianoforte, eTc.
Organist of
St. Mary's, West Kensington, 1874
1897 - 1901
1901 -
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Degrees logo1889
Mus. Bac. Edward Thomas Sweeting
New Col.
Extract: A short historical account of the degrees in music at Oxford and Cambridge.
(Williams, C. F. Abdy)

Logo, Newspaper article MUSICIAN’S FUNERAL.
Formerly Organist at Winchester College.
The funeral took place on Saturday at St. Albans of Dr. Edward Thomas Sweeting. who was for 23 Years Organist and Master of the Music at Winchester College, a position from which retired in 1924
Dr. Sweeting, who was born in 1863, was organist at Rossall School from 1882to 1897. and at St. John’s College, Cambridge. from 1897 to 1901.
He did a great work at Winchester and on his retirement he went on tour all round the Empire conducting examinations for the R.C.M.
He was the author of numerous songs, pianoforte and violin pieces and Church music.
Dr. Sweeting married on August 15, 1900. Miss Keith Craven, daughter of Mr. James Glen, who. with son and a daughter, survives him.

Portsmouth Evening News
Monday 14 July 1930
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Thomas Tallis (or Tallys)
c.1520 - 23rd Nov 1585
Thomas Tallis is Often called the Father of English Church Music. Born about 1520. He was supposed to have been a Chorister in the Chapel Royal.
Organist of Waltham Abbey for some years, until its dissolution, 1540.
Gentleman of the Chapel Royal.
Held letters patent, jointly with Bird, for the exclusive right to print music.
Died, November 23, 1585. Buried in Greenwich Parish Church.
Composer of a large number of works for the Church, some with Latin and others with English words. Known at the present day chiefly by his harmonies to the old Plain-song Responses, called "Tallis's Responses."
If You Love Me Recorded by The King's Singers.
Fantasia Vaughan Williams Music Video
The Best of Tallis 11 songs (1Hr 17Min) Conductor: Jeremy Summerly
It is said that Tallis was in attendance upon Queen Elizabeth at Greenwich Palace at the time when he died. There was an epitaph to him engraved upon a brass plate in the chancel of the old church of Greenwich, where he was buried. The church was pulled down during the last century, when all trace of the
brass plate The epitaph occurs, however, in Strype's continuation of Stow's "Survey Of London," and is as follows:-

Enterred here doth ly a worthy wyght,
Who for long tyme in musick bore the bell ;
His name to shew was Thomas Tallis hyght,
In honest vertuous lyff he dyd excell.
He served long tyme in Chappel with grete prayse,
Fower sovereygnes reignes (a thing not often seene),
I mean King Henry and Prince Edward's dayes,
Quene Marie, and Elizabeth our Quene.
He maryed was, though children he had none,
And lyv'd in love full three and thirty yeres
With loyal spowse, whos name yclept was Jone,
Who here entom'b, him company now bears.
As he dyd lyve, so also dyd he dy,
In myld and quyet sort, O happy man,
To God ful oft for mercy did he cry,
Wherefore he lyves, let Deth do what he can.
was lost.

Organist of
Waltham Abbey
1545 - 1585

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James Targett
Oct 1778 - 15th May 1803
James Targett was born near Kidderminster, October, 1778.
Chorister in Chichester Cathedral, and afterwards Organist there.
Died May 15, 1803, aged 24.
John Marsh, a distinguished amateur of Chichester, edited "Three Anthems and a Hymn in four parts, composed by the late James Targett."
There are also three Chants by him in Marsh's "Cathedral Chants."
Organist of
1801 - 1803
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John Taverner
c. 1490 - 25th Oct 1545
John Taverner 1526 1530 Born at Boston, Lincs, about 1490. Master of the Choir and Stipendiary of Tattershall Collegiate Church, 1525. Appointed, by Cardinal Wolsey, Informator of the Children and Organist at Cardinal College (now Christ Church Cathedral), Oxford, November, 1526, at a salary of £10 a year, with livery and commons.
It is said that, while at Oxford, he narrowly escaped martyrdom for being concerned with heretics. Resigned this appointment, April, 1530. In August, 1538, he and another courtier, named Jones, were appointed by Cromwell to arrange matters for the suppression of the four Friaries at Boston. Died at Boston, the exact year of his death being unknown.
Composer of Masses, Motets, In Nomines, Etc.
(Dr. W. H. Grattan Flood, Musical Times, September, 1921).
Organist of
1526 - 1530
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James Taylor
1833 - 1st Aug 1900
James Taylor was born at Gloucester, 1833.
Pupil of G. W. Morgan. Organist of . Organist of New College, Oxford, 1865. Organist also to the University. Died August 1, 1900. There is a memorial tablet to him on the wall of the Cloisters. Composer of Church Music, Organ pieces, Pianoforte pieces, Songs, &c.
Organist of
St. Mary-le-Crypt, Gloucester, 1850
1865 - 1900
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Degrees logo1873
James Taylor
Mus. Bac.
New Col.
Extract: A short historical account of the degrees in music at Oxford and Cambridge.
(Williams, C. F. Abdy)

Logo, Newspaper article FUNERAL OF DR. TAYLOR.
The funeral of James Taylor, organist the University and to New College, whose death occuired on the 1st inst. at his residence. No. 43, Panbury-road. in this city, took place on Saturday afternoon. The coffin, on which were placed number of beautiful wreaths, was conveyed to New College Chapel, where the first part of the Tonal Service was read by the Rev. Canon Spooner, and the Rev. Canon King, vicar of St. Peter-in-the-East, read the concluding portion at the interment in Holywell Cemetery. The mourners were Mrs. Taylor, widow of the deceased. Mr. Leonard Taylor, Mr. R. Taylor and Mr. C. Taylor, sons, and Miss and Miss Taylor, daughters. The plate on the coffin, which was of polished oak, bore the following inscription : James Taylor, Died August Ist. 1900, Aged 67.
Mr. Leonard C. Taylor asks us to state, in correction of the announcement in last week’s issue, that bis father, the late Dr. James Taylor, enjoyed excellent health for the last two years of his life, except for an illness he had last term, from which had quite recovered. He was quite well on the Tuesday before his death, and died suddenly and unexpectedly from a stroke.

Oxford Times
Saturday 11 August 1900
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George Thaxton

Organist of
1547 - c.1558
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Edward Thompson

Was a Chorister in Magdalen College, Oxford. and probably an articled pupil to his cousin, Thomas Hecht, the Organist there.
Organist of
1718 - 1746
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Edward Henry Thorne
1834 - 26th Dec 1917
Edward Henry Thornewas born at Cranbourne, Dorset, 1834.
Pupil of Sir George Elvey, and Assistant-Organist at St. George's Chapel, Windsor, when only 12 years of age.
While at St. Anne's, Soho, London, his performances of the "Christmas Oratorio," the "St. John" Passion, and other works of Bach, and his Bach Organ Recitals, were notable events among Church musicians and others.
Died December 26, 1917.
Composer of Church Music, Organ pieces, Part-songs, Pianoforte pieces, Etc. His Anthem, "I was glad" was written for the reopening Service at Chichester Cathedral in 1867, after the falling in of the spire.
Organist of
Parish Church, Henley-on-Thames, 1853
, 1863 - 1870
St. Patrick's, Hove, 1870
St. Peter's, Cranley Gardens, London, 1873
St. Michael's, Cornhill, 1875
St. Anne's, Soho, London, 1891

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Extract: A short historical account of the degrees in music at Oxford and Cambridge.
(Williams, C. F. Abdy)

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Logo, Newspaper article DEATH
Dr Edward Henry Thorne, organist and choirmaster of St. Anne's, Soho, London, since 1891, died on Tuesday, aged 82 years.
At the age of 12 he was appointed assistant organist at Windsor Castle, and on many occasions played before Queen Victoria and the Prince Consort.
As a composer he was well known for his anthems and Church music, including "All Thy works praise Thee, In the beginning was the word, O cast thy burden upon the Lord."

Hull Daily Mail
Saturday 30 December 1916
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Logo, Newspaper article EDWARD HENRY THORNE
Dr. Edward Henry Thorne, organist and choirmaster of St. Anne's. Soho, died on Tuesday, at the age of 82 years.
Born at Cranborne, Dorsetshire, in 1834. he was appointed at the age of twelve assistant organist at the Chapel Royal, Windsor Castle, where he was educated.
For seven years he was Cathedral organist at Chichester. and then moved to London. Dr. Thorne was recently described "the Grand Old Man of the musical world," linking the younger generation with S. S. Wesley, W. S. Best, Turle, Goss. Stainer, Sullivan, and Barnby. all of whom knew personally.
As a composer Dr. Thorne was known throughout the English Church for his anthems and Church music, but he will probably more widely remembered as the composer of the setting of three popular hymns, "Jesus calls us o'er the tumult," "Around the Throne of God," and "He. who once in righteous vengeance."
He was for twenty five years organist at St. Anne's, Soho, where he continued the Bach traditions of that church. It is computed that his performances of the Christmas oratorio and the Passion Music drawn over 200,000 persons to those services.

Hastings and St Leonards Observer
Saturday 30 December 1916
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William Tireman
William Tireman
Died March 16, 1777. Buried in All Saints' Church, Cambridge.
Organist of
Doncaster Parish Church, 1739
1741 - 1777
University of St John's College, Cambridge, from February to March, 1777
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Giles Tomkins
? - 1668
Giles Tomkins (Senr.) 1668 1631 According to the records at Salisbury his appointment there was made "Salvo Jure Ed. Tucker, Organiste." He had previously (1629) been appointed Altarist.
Brother of Thomas and John Tomkins.
Reappointed to Salisbury Cathedral post at the Restoration.
Appointed a "Musician for the Virginalls with the voices in ordinary" to Charles 1., April 2, 1630.
Joint-Organist with his brother John to the King on his journey to Scotland, 1633.
Reappointed a "virginal player" in 1660.
Died 1668.
Organist of
, 1624-1626
1631 - 1668
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Giles Tomkins
1633 - 1725
Giles Tomkins (Junr.) Nephew of Thomas Tomkins and son of Giles Tomkins of Salisbury.
Born at Salisbury, 1633.
Dismissed from Worcester Cathedral for absence, April 26, 1662.
Organist of
1661 - 1662
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John Tomkins
c.1586 - 1638
John Tomkins,was the brother of Thomas Tomkins.
Gentleman of the Chapel Royal, 1626.
His stipend on appointment at Kings College, Cambridge, was 50s. a quarter as Organist and 11s. 8d. for instructing the Choristers. The stipend as Organist was afterwards augmented to 58s. 4d.
According to the records his payment as Organist at Kings College, Cambridge, ceased in 1619 ; but his name appears from time to time in the list of resident members of the College who were entitled to allowances for Commons, until 1621.
Died 1638. Buried in St. Paul's Cathedral.
Some Anthems by him are to be found in Barnard's Collection.
An inscription to him in the North Aisle of the Old Cathedral, where he was buried, read as follows:—

Johannes Tomkins, Musicæ
Baccalaureus, organista sui
temporis celeberrimus, post-quam
Capellæ regali, per annos
duodecim, huic autem Ecclesiæ
per novem decem sedulo inser-
viisset, ad cœlestem chorum
migravit Septembris 27, Anno
Domini 1638. Ætatis suæ 52.
Cujus desiderium mærens uxor
hoc testatur marmore.

Organist of

1622 - 1638
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1608.

Mus. Bac.—John Tomkins, son of Rev. Thomas Tomkins, Minor Canon of Gloucester. He was born in 1586, and became Organist of King's College, Cambridge, in 1606. He belonged to a large family of musicians, and was a brother of Thomas Tomkins, Mus. Bac., of Oxford).
Later in life he became Organist of St. Paul's Cathedral and a member of the Chapel Royal, and died in 1638. Barnard's collection contains some anthems by him.
Extract: A short historical account of the degrees in music at Oxford and Cambridge.
(Williams, C. F. Abdy)
Thomas Tomkins (Senr.)
Thomas Tomkins (Senr.) was the father of the Thomas Tomkins who became Organist of Worcester Cathedral.
Was Vicar Choral in 1571, when on July 12 he was admonished by the Precentor. On April 29, 1577, he is described as "Master of the Choristers and Organ Player," when, upon his declaration that he was unable to live upon the "wages and commodity" then offered to him, his son—Thomas Tomkins, Junr. was granted a Vicar's Stall which had become vacant, "to the end that his poor father, at whose finding he is, may thereby the rather be relieved." This, however, he forfeited in 1586, for misbehaviour.
Thomas Tomkins, Senr., afterwards became Precentor of Gloucester Cathedral. He is probably the composer of the Madrigal "The fauns and satyrs tripping," included in "The Triumphs of Oriana," 1601.
Organist of
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Thomas Tomkins
1575 - 1656
Thomas Tomkins, (jnr.) was the son of Thomas Tomkins, Senr., a Vicar-Choral and Organist of St. David's Cathedral.
Born at St. David's about 1575. Possibly a Chorister in the Chapel Royal. Pupil of Bird. Gentleman and Organist of the Chapel Royal, 1621 ; afterwards Organist of Worcester Cathedral.
Died 1656. Buried at Martin Hussingtree, near Worcester.
Composer of "Musica Deo Sacra et Ecclesiæ Anglicanæ; or, Musick dedicated to the Honor and Service of God," and other Church Music, Madrigals, pieces for Virginals, Etc.
In 1613-14, and again in 1639-40, Tomkins appears to have been actively concerned in the erection of new organs in the Cathedral.
In 1625, 40 shillings was paid to him "for composing of many songes against the Coronation of Kinge Charles." From the Treasurer's Accounts, 1643 .—— quot;To the Mason for tyles, lyme and worke, done in repaöion of Mr. Organist's house, ruined by a canon shott.
When
William WallerSiege of Worcester (1643)
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attempted the taking of the city, May 29, 1643 4s. 4d "

Organist of
1596 - 1656
1621 - 1656
Thomas Tomkins Thomas Tomkins
Thomas Tomkins

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Organist of

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Extract: A short historical account of the degrees in music at Oxford and Cambridge.
(Williams, C. F. Abdy)
John Tomkins

Organist of
1606 - 1619 (21?)
1622 - 1638

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John Travers
John Travers was born about 1703. A Chorister in St. George's Chapel, Windsor. Pupil of Dr. Greene and Dr. Pepusch.
Died 1758.
Composer of Church Music, Songs, Organ pieces, Etc.
Organist of
St. Paul's, Covent Garden
Fulham Parish Church
1737 - 1758

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Edward Tucker
Edward Tucker was a Composer of Church Music. The Anthem, "This is the day," generally attributed to the Rev. Wm. Tucker (Minor Canon of Westminster, 1660), is more probably the composition of Edward Tucker, from the fact that it appears in an old MS. Bass part-book, formerly in the possession of the late J. S. Bumpus, bearing evidences of belonging to a pre-Restoration period. It is there attributed to "Mr. Tucker."
Organist of
1626 - 1638
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Thomas Tudway
- 23rd Nov 1726
Thomas Tudway was born about 1650. Is said to have been a Chorister in the Chapel Royal and afterwards a Lay Vicar of St. George's Chapel, Windsor. Organist of King's College, Cambridge, 1670 ; also Organist to the University and of Pembroke Hall. University Professor of Music, 1705. Composer and Organist Extraordinary to Queen Anne, 1705. Deprived of his appointments owing to some remarks which he made being considered disloyal to the Queen, 1706, but re-instated in all these posts the following year.
Eventually resigned them in 1726, and spent the latter portion of his life in forming, at the instigation of Lord Harley, the valuable collection of English Music known as the "Tudway" Collection (British Museum, Harleian MSS., 7337-7342).
Died 1730.
Composer of Church Music, Songs, Etc.
Tudway was an inveterate punster, and part of the offence which deprived him of his appointments was a remark complaining of the paucity of the patronage of the Chancellor, the Duke of Somerset: "The Chancellor rides us all, without a bit in our mouths"
Organist of
1670 1726
Thomas Tudway Thomas Tudway
Thomas Tudway

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Logo, Newspaper article Laft Week died
Dr. Thomas Tudway, Profeffor of Mufick in the Univerfity of Cambridge, being upwards of 70 Years of Age. He was Organift of King's College, and Pembroke-Hall ; the former of which Places he enjoy'd above fifty Years.

Newcastle Courant
Saturday 10 December 1726
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Harry William Tupper
1871- 28th sep 1929
Harry William Tupperwas born at Dartford, Kent.
Pupil of Drs. C. W. Pearce and E. H. Turpin and Sir John Stainer.
Acting-Organist and Master of the Choristers at Lichfield Cathedral for a time during 1904.
Organist of
St. Peter's, Staines, 1889
Parish Church, Bishop's Stortford, 1891
Parish Church, Burton-on-Trent, 1898
Hexbam Abbey, 1917
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Logo, Newspaper article Organist's Tragic Death.
When members of the Press arrived at the house of the late Mr. Harry William Tupper, Mus. Bac. (Oxon.). F.R.C.0.. of 88. Radcliffe-road, West Bridgford, they were informed by the County Coroner (Lt.-Col. Bradwell), that the inquest would be held in camera. This is a most unusual procedure, and a wrong construction may have been put on the reason for the exclusion of newspaper men.
For many years the deceased was organist at the Burton-on-Trent Parish Church. subsequently filling a similar post at, Bouthwell Cathedral.
Last Friday he retired to bed about 10 p.m.. but early the next morning was found dead by his wife. The room was full of gas, and a coat and towel had been placed around the frame of her husband's bedroom door. Near his mouth was a tube attached to the gas bracket.
Hilda Mary Tupper, the widow, was the only witness called at the inquest, although Dr. C. H. Warner. of Southwell, who is the Medical Officer of Health for Beeston, was also present. Mrs. Tupper stated that her husband was 58 years of age. Until July he had been organist at Southwell Minster for 11 years. He resigned owing to a breakdown in health. The fact of leaving Southwell made him depressed. He had said he would be better out of the way. On Friday he seemed depressed.
Deceased retired to bed about 10 p.m. as usual, sleeping in a room by himself. "I awoke, and thought I could smell gas, about 5.10 a.m.," said witness. "I thought I was mistaken. I went to his room about 7.40 a.m., and found the door blocked. I found him in bed, with a gas tube near him, which was attached to a bracket near his bed. He was dead, and in his nightshirt." The verdict was: "That Harry William Tupper died from carbon monoxide poisoning. and that he committed suicide whilst in an unsound state of mind."

Beeston Gazette and Echo
Saturday 05 October 1929
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Logo, Newspaper article Organist's Will.
Mr. Harry William Tupper. Mus.Bac.. F.R.C.0.. of 88. Radcliffe-road. West Bridgford. formerly organist at Southwell, Cathedral. who died on September 28th intestate. left (state of the gross value of £3.557. with net personalty £2.841. Letters of administration of his will has been granted to his widow. Hilda Mary Tupper, of 88. Radchffe-rcad, West Bridgford. and Henry George Seymour. bank manager. of 36. Ashfield-avenue, King's Berth. Birmingham.

South Notts Echo
Saturday 30 November 1929
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James Turle
5th Mar 1802 - 28th Jun 1882
James Turle was born at Taunton, March 5, 1802.
Chorister in Wells Cathedral. Pupil of J. J. Goss and G. E. Williams.
Appointed Deputy-Organist at Westminster Abbey, 1819.
Music Master to the School for the Indigent Blind, 1829.
Succeeded
Greatorex
Thomas Greatorex
1758 - 18th Jul 1831
as Organist of Westminster Abbey, 1831.
Retired from active duties of the post. 1875.
Died in London, June 28, 1882. Buried in Norwood Cemetery.
Composer of Church Music, Glees, Etc.
Joint-Author, with E. Taylor, of"The Art of Singing at Sight. "
Editor of Willbye's First Set of Madrigals; Single and Double Chants, composed for the use of the Choral Service of Westminster Abbey.
Joint Editor, with Dr. J. F. (now Sir Frederick)
Bridge
Sir Frederick Bridge
5th Dec 1844 – 18th Mar 1924
, of the Westminster Abbey Chant Book, Etc. Compiler of Hymn and Chant Books, Etc.
On the day of Tune's retirement, September 19, 1875, his Service in D was sung at Westminster Abbey.
There is a memorial tablet to him in the West Cloister, and a window in the North Aisle of the Choir.

Organist of
Christ Church, Southwark, 1819;
St. James's, Bermondsey, 1829.
1831 - 1882
James Turle James Turle
James Turle

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Robert Turle
1804 - 1877
Robert Turle was the Younger brother of James Turle, Organist of Westminster Abbey.
Born at Taunton, 1804. Appointed Organist of Armagh Cathedral, in succession to F. W. Horncastle. Retired on a pension, 1872.
Died at Salisbury, 1877.
Composer of Church Music. Two Double Chants by him are still in use.
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Christopher Tye
c.1500 - c,15th Mar 1573
Christopher Tye "Magister Choristarum" and Organist.
Born about 1500.
Probably a Chorister in King's College, Cambridge. Lay Clerk there in 1536, obtaining his degree of Mus.B. in the same year. Took Orders in 1560, and held successively the Rectories of Little Wilbraham, Newton, and Doddington-cum-March.
Is said to have been appointed Organist of the Chapel Royal in 1562, but this seems doubtful. Possibly he took occasional duty there (see the anecdote below).
Died circa January, 1572-3.
A prominent Organist and Composer of the Reformation period. Commenced rhythmical paraphrase of the Acts of the Apostlep, and set it to music. It was unsuccessful, and he never completed the task. Early copies of his Evening Service in G minor and of four Anthems are in the Ely Cathedral Library.
According to Anthony Wood : "Dr. Tye was a peevish and humorsome man. especially in his later days, and sometimes playing on the organ in the Chapel of Queen Elizabeth, which contained much music but little to delight the ear, she would send the verger to tell him that he played out of tune, whereupon he sent word that her ears were out of tune."
Organist of
1562?
1841 - 1561
Christopher Tye Christopher Tye
Christopher Tye

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Degrees logoActs of the Apostles into English metre, and set them to music ; but they were not a success, for Tye, though he had a good reputation as a literary man, was no poet.
Hawkins quotes a portion of this work, consisting of a fine Canon to words beginning &qute;It chanced in Iconium, as we ofttimes did use.&qute; After this he set selections from the Psalms, which compositions he called anthems, a corruption of antiphon.
In 1541 he became Organist of Ely Cathedral, and held this post till 1561, when he was probably appointed to the Royal Chapel.
In 1548 he incorporated at Oxford. He died about 1580.
Compositions by him are preserved in the Music School and at Ch. Ch., Oxford, in the Tudway collection, in Rimbault's and Boyce's Cathedral Music, in Barnard's Church Music, in Page's &qute;Harmonia Sacra,&qute; and in Mulliner's MS. (Add. MSS., 30,513).
He was in Holy Orders, and held successively the Rectories of Little Wil- braham, Newton, and Doddington-cum-March, all in Cambridgeshire.
Tye was the first of the great school of composers for the English Cathedral Service, and prepared the ground for Tallis and Bird. Wood attributes to him the restoration of Church music, after it had been ruined by the dissolution of the monasteries.
1545 - Mus. Doc. — Christopher Tye.
Extract: A short historical account of the degrees in music at Oxford and Cambridge.
(Williams, C. F. Abdy)

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Walter Vicary
1770 - 5th Jan 1845
Walter Vicary was born 1770.
Chorister in the Chapel Royal. Assistant-Organist to Dr. P. Hayes at Magdalen College; Organist, Magdalen College, 1797. Lay Chaplain of New College, Oxford, 1812-1844. Lay Clerk of St. John's College, Oxford, 1816-1828. Organist to the University, 1830.
Died at Oxford, January 5, 1845. Buried in Holywell Churchyard.
Composer of Church Music, Songs, Etc.
Organist of
1797 - 1845
Walter Vicary Walter Vicary
Walter VicaryClick to see orriginal
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Organist of Magdalen College, 1797- 1845 ; Lay-Chaplain of New College, 1812-44 i Singing Man of St. John's College, 1816-28 ; Organist of St. Mary's Church, 1830.
He was born in 1770, and died in 1845.
Extract: A short historical account of the degrees in music at Oxford and Cambridge.
(Williams, C. F. Abdy)

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On the 5th instant, at his residence in holywell-street, Oxford, at a very advanced age, Walter Vicary, Esq., for upwards of thirty years of Magdeline College.

Morning Chronicle
Tuesday 07 January 1845
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Frederick William Wadely
1882 - 1970
Frederick William Wadely was born at Kidderminster, 1882, and received his early musical training from his father.
Organ Scholar of Selwyn College, Cambridge, and Stewart of Rannoch Scholar, 1900-1903.
Pupil of Sir Charles Stanford, Sir Walter Parratt, and Dr. Charles Wood at the Royal College of Music and at Cambridge.
Conductor of the Carlisle Symphony Concerts and the Carlisle Musical Society.
Composer of two Concert Overtures, a set of Symphonic Variations, various pieces for Chorus and Orchestra, Songs with orchestral accompaniment, Church Music, Organ pieces, Part-songs, Etc.
Organist of
Wolverly Parish Church, 1895
St. Andrew's, Uxbridge, 1903
Malvern Priory Church, 1904
1910.

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John Wainwright
1723 - 1768
John Wainwright was born at Stockport, 1723. Baptized April 14, 1723. Buried at Stockport, January 28, 1768.
Deputy-Organist at Manchester Cathedral prior to becoming organist.
Composer of Anthems, Hymns, Chants, Etc. His well known tune to "Christians, awake, salute the happy morn," was first published in his "Collection of Psalm Tunes, Anthems, Hymns, and Chants, for One, Two, Three, and Four voices," in 1766.
Organist of
1767 - 1768

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Richard Wainwright
1758 - 20th Aug 1825
Richard Wainwright Son of the preceding. Born 1758.
Succeeded his brother as organist at St. Peter's, Liverpool, 1782. Organist for some time at St. James's, Toxteth Park. Re- appointed Organist of St. Peter's, 1813.
Died August 20, 1825.
Composer of Church Music, Glees,
Organist of
St. Anne's, Manchester
1775 - 1782
St. Peter's, Liverpool, 1782 & 1813

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Robert Wainwright
1748 - 15th Jul 1782
Robert Wainwright was the son of John Wainwright. Born 1748.
Died July 15, 1782.
Buried in St. Peter's, Liverpool.
Composer of an Oratorio, "The Fall of Egypt," a Te Deum, Psalm Tunes, Etc.
In 1766 Robert Wainwright competed for the post of Organist at Halifax Parish Church. Dr. Miller, in his "History of Doncaster," relates the following story in connection with that occasion :— "A new organ by Snetzler had been erected in the Parish Church, and was opened with an Oratorio by Mr. Joah Bates. There were seven candidates for the situation of Organist: among them were Robert Wainwright and F. W. Herschel, then leader of the concerts at Halifax, and an intimate friend of Dr. Miller. Concerning the others we have no information. On the day of trial, August 30, they attended at the church, and the order in which they were to play was decided by lot. The second was drawn by Wainwright and the third by Herschel. Wainwright's execution was so rapid that old Snetzler ran about exclaiming, ' Te tevil, te tevll, he run over te keys like voh cat; he vill not give my piphes room for to shpeak.' During this performance Miller said to Herschel, What chance have you to follow this man?' He replied, ' I don't know, but I am sure fingers will not do.' In due time he ascended the gallery and drew from the organ such a full volume of slow solemn harmony as Miller could by no means account for. After a short extempore effusion of this character, he finished with the Old 100th tune, which he played better than his opponent had done. Aye, aye,' cried Snetzler, ' tish is very goot, very goot inteet; I will luff tish man, for he gives my piphes room for to shpeak.' Herschel being afterwards asked by Miller by what means he had produced so uncommon an effect, answered, I told you fingers would not do,' and, taking two pieces of lead from his waistcoat pocket, he said. ' One of these I placed on the lowest key of the organ and the other on the octave above; thus, by accommodating the harmony, I gained the power of four hands instead of two.' Herschel was thereupon appointed, but soon after entered upon other pursuits, and the Musician has been long forgotten in the Astronomer ."—(See Parr's "Church of England Psalmody."
Organist of
1768 - 1775

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1774
Mus. Bac. and Mus. Doc. — Robert Wainwright, of Magdalen College. Born in 1748; Organist of St. Peter's, Liverpool, 1775. His Oratorio "The Fall of Egypt" was produced at Liverpool in 1780, and he wrote some services and anthems. He died in 1782.
Extract: A short historical account of the degrees in music at Oxford and Cambridge.
(Williams, C. F. Abdy)

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Tuefday laft, very fuddenly at Liverpool, Robert Wainwright, Doctor in mufic, organift of St. Peter’s Church in that town, a gentleman eminent in his profeffion, both a compofer and performer, and not more refpected for thefe than for the virtues his mind, which were confpicuous to all his acquaintances.

Cumberland Pacquet, and Ware's Whitehaven Advertiser
Tuesday 23 July 1782
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On Thurfday laft was married, Robert Wainwright, Muf. D. Organift in Manchefter, to Mifs Woodworth

Leeds Intelligencer
Tuesday 17 January 1775
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Anthony Walkeley
1672 - 1717
Anthony Walkeley was born 1672.
Chorister in Wells Cathedral, and afterwards Vicar Choral there.
Died at Salisbury, 1717. Buried in Salisbury Cathedral Nave.
A Morning Service by him in E flat is included in Tudway's Collection, and some of his Anthems are extant in MS. His Morning Service in A was for a long time a favourite at Salisbury.
Organist of
1698? - 1717
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George Waterhouse
- Feb 1602

Organist of
? - ?
1588 - 1602

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Thomas Attwood Walmisley
21th Jan 1814 - 17th Jan 1856
Thomas Attwood Walmisley was born January 21st 1814 at Westminster.
Pupil of his father, Thomas Forbes Walmkley, and of his godfather, Thomas Attwood.
University Professor of Music, 1836, while he was still in residence for his B.A. degree. It is said that about this time he was playing the organ at as many as eight services every Sunday—twice at each of the following places: King's College, Trinity College, St. John's College, and the University Church.
Died at Caroline Place, Hastings, January 1st 1856.
Buried in Fairlight Churchyard.
Composer of Odes, Church Music, Organ pieces, Songs, Duets for Pianoforte and Oboe, Etc.
His Cathedral music was edited by his father, T. Forbes Walmisley.
Organist of
Croydon Parish Church ,1830
1821 - 1832
1833 - 1856
Thomas Attwood Walmisley
Thomas Attwood Walmisley

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Thomas Forbes Walmisley
22nd May 1783 – 10th Jul 1866
Thomas Forbes Walmisley was the father of Thomas Attwood Walmisley.
Organist of
St Martin-in-the-Fields
Thomas Forbes Walmisley
Thomas Forbes Walmisley

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William Walond
Jan 1750 - 9th Feb 1836
William Walond was probably a son of William Walond, Mus.B., of Oxford.
Deputy-Organist Chichester Cathedral 1775.
Resigned his post at Chichester Cathedral in 1801 and lived for some time in the city in extreme poverty, his only means of subsistence being a small annuity raised upon the sale of some houses.
Died February 9, 1836.
Portions of his compositions are to be found in the Chichester Cathedral Choir books.
Organist of
1794 - 1801

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Theodore Walrond
5th Dec 1872 - 1935
Theodore Walrond was born at Glasgow. December 5, 1872.
Pupil of Edwin Edwards and Basil Johnson at Rugby School, and of Dr. Harwood, at Oxford.
Music Master at Giggleswick School, 1899.
Assistant-Organist of Carlisle Cathedral, 1906.
Organist of
St. Cuthbert's, Carlisle
1909 - 1910
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Logo, Newspaper article MR. THEODORE WALROND APPOINTED
The Dean and Chapter have appointed Mr. Theodore Walrond acting organist of the Cathedral in succession to Mr. Sydney H. Nicholson, who isgoing to Manchester Cathedral in July.
Mr. Walrond come to Carlisle on January 1st. 1906. having been appointed organist of St. Cuthberts, Church in succession to Mr. C. O'Connor Morris.
During the past two years he has acted as assistant to Mr. Nicholson and become thoroughly acquainted with the Cathedral organ and the choir.
Prior to 1906 Mr. Walrond was for seven years music master and organist at Giggleswick School.
He was educated at Rugby and at Balliol College. Oxford. He is an M.A. of Oxford, and a Fellow of the Royal College of Organists.
He was born at Glasgow, but spent the greater part of his life at Rugby.
Since coming to Carlisle he has taken great interest in local musical affairs, and has done much in the capacity of hon. secretary of the Carlisle Musical Festival to help forward the annual competitions held in the Drill Hall. He is a skilful executant and accomplished soloist.
By his appointment the post of organist at St. Cuthbert's will shortly become vacant.

Carlisle Journal
Friday 22 May 1908
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George Walsh
- 2nd Mar 1765
George Walsh was appointed a Vicar Choral of St. Patrick's Cathedral, 1760.
Died March 2, 1765.
Composer of a Morning Service in D, which is still in use at Christ Church, and copies of which are said to exist in some of the English Cathedrals. Sir Robert Stewart thought so highly of it that he added a Communion Service in the same key and style. A fine score copy of "Walsh in D" was in the possession of Mr. J. S. Bumpus.
Organist of
1747 - 1765
1760 - 1765
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John Wanless(e)
John Wanless(e).
Admitted Organist of Lincoln Cathedral by the Chancellor after Evening Prayers. Salary, £20 per annum.
In 1625 the Gate House Cbambers in Vicars' Court were assigned to him at a rent of 10s. per annum.
Organist of
1616 - ?
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Thomas Wanless
Thomas Wanless was probably the son of John Wanless(e), of Lincoln.
In the York Cathedral Chapter books he is described as in "musicis experium." He published at York a collection of Words of Anthems sung in the Cathedral. Composer of the "York Litany," of which there are different versions extant. An Anthem by him is in the Tudway Collection.
Organist of
1691 - ?
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George Warne
George Warne was born 1792. He was blind.
Retired from the Temple Church, 1843.
Died at Bath, October 29, 1868.
Composer of a "Set of Psalm Tunes, as sung at the Temple Church, London " (1838), several Songs, and Pianoforte pieces.
Organist of
St Helen's Bishopsgate 1819 - 1820
St Magnus-the-Martyr 1820 - 1826
1826 - 1843
St. Nicholas Church, Great Yarmouth 1843 - 1856

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Logo, Newspaper article DEATHS
October 20th. at Bath. Mr. George Warne. formerly organist of the Temple Church, London, aged 71

Derbyshire Courier
Saturday 07 November 1868
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William Warren
? - 1841
William Warren was the nephew of Langrish Doyle.
Joint-Organist with Dr. Doyle at Christ Church Cathedral, 1805
Died in Dublin, 1841.
Organist of
1814 - 1841
1827 - 1828
Trinity College Chapel
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Thomas Warrock (or Warwick)
Thomas Warrock (or Warwick) was a descendant of an old Cumberland family, and father of Sir Philip Warwick , Secretary to the Treasury in the reign of Charles Il.
In 1641 he appears in the list of the King's musicians as "For the Virginall." The year of his death is unknown. Composer of Church Music, and a Song in forty parts, which is said to have been performed before Charles I. There are two pieces by him in the Fitzwilliam Virginal Book.
His name appears among the benefactors to the Library of the Vicars Choral at Hereford.
During his appointment as Organist of the Chapel Royal, he had (on March 29, 1630) to forfeit a month's salary "because he presumed to play verses on the organ at service tyme, being formerly inhibited by the Deane from doinge the same, by reason of his insufficiency for that solemn service."
Organist of
1586 - 1589
1625

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John Watkins
John Watkins, Vicar Choral, was probably Organist Lincoln Cathedral 1518-1524.
He was required to compose a Mass and an Antiphon for his Degree.
Clerk of the Revestry Lincoln Cathedral, 1527.
Died 1542.
Organist of
1518 - 1524 ??
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James Weare
James Weare was admitted as Vicar Choral and Organist at Wells Cathedral for a year of probation. In 1609 he was admitted a perpetual Vicar Choral.
Organist of
1608 - 1613
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Thomas Henry Weaving
1881 - 1966
Thomas Henry Weaving was born at Birmingham, 1881.
Organ and Harmony Scholar at the Royal Irish Academy of Music, 1897-99
Conductor of the Æolian, Rathmines and Bray Musical Societies.
Composer of Church Music, secular, choral, and instrumental music.
Organist of
Straffan Church, 1897
Rutland Square Church, 1899
Christ Church, Kingstown, 1910
Chapel Royal, Dublin, 1917
1920 -
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Edward Webb
Edward Webb Died 1788, through loss of blood, after undergoing an operation for the removal of a
wen a benign encysted tumor of the skin, especially on the scalp, containing sebaceous matter; a sebaceous cyst.
from the nostril.
Buried in the Cloisters of St. George's Chapel, Windsor.
Organist of
1756 - 1788
1756 - 1788
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Robert Webb
Robert Webb
The Accounts of Gloucester Cathedral mention that at the time of the building of the organ by Harris (1665), "he was a-lying sick and poverty-stricken." There are several payments recorded in connection with his illness, burial, and his orphan daughter.
Organist of
1662 - 1664
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John Wederby
John Wederby
Organist of
c.1441 - 1442
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Thomas Weelkes
1575 - 30th Nov 1623
Thomas Weelkes was born about 1575.
Organist of Winchester College, at a salary of 15. 4d. a quarter.
Died, while on a visit to London, November 30, 1623. Buried at St. Bride's, Fleet Street.
Better known at the present time by his Madrigals than by his Church Music. There is an Anthem by him, "O Lord, grant the king a long life," in Barnard's Collection ; two were also published by the Musical Antiquarian Society, and others are extant in MS. His Service in F is given in Benjamin Cosyn's Virginal Book.
"The Organist shall remain in the Choir until the last psalm be sung and then go up to the organs, and there having done his duty, return into the Choir again to bear his part all along, under the amercement of iij. toties quoties. This is thought a meet matter in all double choirs, much more is it necessary in all half-choirs, as ours Statutes of the Dean and Chapter, 1616.")
Organist of
1598 - 1602
1602 - 1623

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Degrees logo1602 Mus. Bac. — Thomas Weelkes, of New College, Organist of Wykeham's College, Winchester. Nothing is known of his life or the time of his birth or death. He was one of the most eminent of the madrigal writers, and his compositions, which are numerous, are still very popular, and several have been republished of late. Besides his published collections, he contributed to Leighton's "Teares and Lamentacions," Barnard's Collection, and there are MSS. of his compositions at the Royal College of Music and the British Museum.
Extract: A short historical account of the degrees in music at Oxford and Cambridge.
(Williams, C. F. Abdy)
John Weldon
19th Jan 1676 - 7th May 1736
John Weldon was a Composer to the Chapel Royal 1715. (A second Composer's appointment was created and Weldon was the first to hold it.)
Born at Chichester, January 19, 1676. Pupil of John Walter at Eton College, and of Henry Purcell.
Gentleman Extraordinary of the Chapel Royal, 1701.
Composer (in the second place) to the Chapel Royal, 1715.
Died May 7, 1736. Buried in the Churchyard of St. Paul's, Covent Garden.
ComposerJohn Weldon's manuscript of "O be joyful". In the British Library.
of Church Music, Operas, Songs, Airs for two Flutes and a Bass, Etc.
Organist of
St. Bride's, Fleet Street
St. Martin-in-the-Fields, 1726
1694 - 1702
1708 - 1736
John Weldon John Weldon
John Weldon

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Samuel Sebastian Wesley
Wesley-S-S
14th Aug 1810 - 19th Apr 1876
Samuel Sebastian Wesley,was the Son of Samuel Wesley and grandson of the Rev. Charles Wesley, the hymn writer.
Born in London, August 14, 1810. Chorister in the Chapel Royal.
Died at Gloucester, April 19, 1876. Buried in the Old Cemetery, Exeter. There is a tablet to his memory in the North Aisle of the Nave at Exeter Cathedral, one also in the North Choir Aisle of Winchester Cathedral, and a stained glass window in the South Chantry of the Lady Chapel at Gloucester Cathedral.
Distinguished Church composer and Organist. Composer of Church Music, Odes, Madrigals, Organ pieces, Pianoforte pieces, Songs, Etc.
Author of pamphlets on Cathedral Music. Editor of a "Selection of Psalms and Hymns" and "The European Psalmist (1872)". There is an interesting Organ book at Hereford Cathedral containing the organ part of Wesley's Anthem, "The Wilderness," in the composer's own handwriting. The same book also contains his "Blessed be the God and Father," and "O God, Whose nature and property."
Dr. Wesley was a prominent advocate of reform in musical matters at our Cathedrals, and wrote and lectured with considerable insight and ability on the subject. But his efforts to obtain from the Cathedral authorities a larger amount of interest, and to place the musical service on a higher and more satisfactory footing, were only partly successful during his lifetime; and being a man of unusually sensitive temperament, it is more than probable that the many troubles and disappointments which he experienced in his Cathedral duties, helped in a great measure to shorten his days.
There can be no doubt that these troubles largely accounted for the migratory character of his career as a Cathedral Organist.
The following extracts from a pamphlet by him, entitled "A few words on Cathedral Music and the Musical System of the Church, with a plan of Reform" (London: Rivingtons, 1849), Will serve to illustrate one or two of his views.
"Painful and dangerous is the position of a young musician who, after acquiring great knowledge of his art in the Metropolis, joins a country Cathedral. At first he can scarcely believe that the mass of error and inferiority in which he has to participate is habitual and irremediable. He thinks he will reform matters, gently, and without giving offence ; but he soon discovers that it is his approbation and not his advice that is needed. The choir is 'the best in England' (such being the belief at most Cathedrals), and, if he give trouble in his attempts at improvement. he would be, by some Chapters, at once voted a person with whom they 'cannot go on smoothly,' and 'a bore.'
"He must learn to tolerate error, to sacrifice principle, and yet to indicate, by his outward demeanour, the most perfect satisfaction in his ofifce, in which, if he fail, he will assuredly be worried and made miserable. If he resign his situation a hundre less scrupulous candidates soon appear, not one of whom feels it a shame to accept office on the terms, and his motives being either misunderstood, or misrepresented wilfully, or both, no practical good results from the step."
Referring to the careless performances and to the inferior quality of the music often performed, he says :—
"The illusive and fascinating effect of musical sound in a Cathedral unfortunately serves to blunt criticism, and casts a veil over defects otherwise unbearable. No coat of varnish can do for a picture what the exquisitely reverberating qualities of a Cathedral do for music. And then, the organ ! what a multitude of sins does that cover !"
His argument with those who would have nothing but Plain-song in the musical service is thoroughly characteristic and convincing :—
"Some would reject all music but the unisonous Chants of a period of absolute barbarism—which they term ' Gregorian.' All is ' Gregorian that in the black, diamond note. ! These men would look a Michael Angelo in the face and tell him Stonehenge was the perfection of architecture."
Here is another characteristic passage referring to the want of support many composers of eminence have experienced, and their pecuniary embarrassments resulting therefrom :—
"Why should we not have monuments to perpetuate the fame of those who neglect their duty, as well as of those who perform it ?"
As a part of his "Plan of Reform" he suggests that the minimum number of lay singers at one Cathedral should be fixed at twelve, with the addition of a few competent volunteer members. He considers it absolutely necessary that there should be a Musical College for the efficient training of Cathedral Organists and Singers, every Cathedral being required to contribute to its support.
"The Cathedral Organist "should in every instance be a professor of the highest ability—a master in the most elevated departments of composition and efficient in the conducting and superintendence of a choral body."
One of the concluding sentences of the pamphlet runs thus :—
"Amongst the dignitaries of the Church are several distinguished persons who are fully alive to the high interests of music, and who do not forget that whatever is offered to God should be as faultless as man can make it. Music should not be compelled to bring her worst gift to the altar! Is it too much to ask of them some public effort in support of Cathedral Music? From whom could it so well come ?"
On the recommendation of Mr. Gladstone, Wesley was offered the honour of knighthood, with the alternative of a Civil List pension of {100 per annum, for his distinguished services to Church Music. He chose the latter, remarking that "it was a nice little nest egg." This pension was continued to his widow. The last time Dr. Wesley played the organ in Gloucester Cathedral was on the afternoon of Christmas Day, 1875. Before the Service was over he asked his assistant, Mr. C. E. Clarke, for an old full score of "The Messiah," which he kept in the organ loft, and from it he played, as the concluding voluntary, the "Hallelujah" chorus, an unusual thing for him to do, as he generally extemporized or played one of Bach's Fugues from memory. He never touched the Cathedral organ again, and in April of the following year the gifted brain and clever fingers were at rest. His last words were, "Let me see the sky," a fitting request from a man of such high ideals and noble inspirations.

Organist of
St. James's Chapel, Hampstead Road, 1826;
St. Giles's, Camberwell, January 12, 1829
St. John's, Waterloo Road, 1829
Parish Church, Hampton-on-Thames, 1830
, 1832
, 1835
Leeds Parish Church, 1842
, 1849
, 1850
Gloucester Cathedral, 1865
Samuel Sebastian Wesley Samuel Sebastian Wesley
Samuel Sebastian Wesley

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Degrees logo1839 Mus. Bac. and Mus. Doc. — Samuel Sebastian Wesley, son of Samuel and grandson of Rev. Charles Wesley. He was born in 1810, and educated at the Bluecoat School.
He became a chorister of the Chapel Royal, St. James's, in 1813, and in 1827 was appointed Organist of St. James's Church, Hampstead. Shortly after this he was holding four organ appointments simultaneously. In 1832 he became Organist of Hereford Cathedral, and was Conductor of the Festival of 1834. In 1835 he was appointed Organist of Exeter Cathedral, at which time he was considered the first organist and church composer in England. In 1842 he became Organist of Leeds Parish Church, and in 1849 of Winchester Cathedral.
His degree exercise was the eight-part anthem "O Lord, Thou art my God." In 1865 he was appointed Organist of Gloucester Cathedral, where he remained till his death in 1876.
His compositions consist of anthems, services, glees, organ and piano pieces, of which a catalogue is given in Grove's Dictionary.
Extract: A short historical account of the degrees in music at Oxford and Cambridge.
(Williams, C. F. Abdy)

Logo, Newspaper article DR. SAMUEL SEBASTIAN WESLEY.
This distinguished musical composer, who has so unexpectedly passed away from us, was born in London in the early part of the year 1810, and died most peacefully at his residence in Palace Yard, Gloucester, April 19th, aged sixty-six years.

His family is one of great antiquity, the pedigree of which has recently been traced backward for more than nine centuries. Amongst them were men of high rank, piety, learning, and genius. A patriot of this family bore the Royal Standard before Henry II, during the wars in Ireland in 1172. Nearly two centuries later, the heroism of another son of the family led him to Palestine with the Crusaders, where be fell fighting the Saracens. From the same branch of the Wesley descended the ancestors of Lord Mornington, the Marquis Wellesley, and the Duke of Wellington
The father of Dr. Wesley Mr. Samuel Wesley, the great musical composer, who died in 1887, and who was the firat person to introonce into England the now widely appreciated music of John S. Bach. Dr. Wesley inherited from his accomplished father the genius which raised him to so high a position, both as composer andorganist, and from him he received much in return in early life. At the age of six he was privileged, withonly few other boys, to attend the Bluecoat School without wearing the uniform.
In 1819, during the period of one of his father’s severe illnesses, he was chosen as a chorister at the Chapel Royal, St. James's, where he remained for eight years, his teachers being Mr. Molineaux and Mr. Hawes. In company with another of the Chapel Royal choristers, be had to go to Brighton every Saturday for three years together, at the expense of the King, when George IV. was staying at the Pavilion in that town, and bad to sing on Saturday evening and on Sunday before the King and the Royal Dukes. On one of those visits be beard Rossini sing before his Majesty. The two boys boarded at the Pavilion, and retained in a post-chaise to their duties in London Monday. The King would sometimes go to the lads, and speak a kind word to them, and once his Majesty inquired of Mr. Hawes what was the relationship between the young chorister, Wesley,and Mr. Charles Wesley (his uncle), who was private organist to the King. His Majesty ordered a gold watch to be presented to young Wesley.
Dr. Wesley commenced his public duties as organist in 1827 at the age of seventeen, when was appointed to conduct the musical service in St. James's Church, Hampstead Road. Two years afterwards he was appointed organist at St. Giles’s Parish Church, Camberwell, when formed the acquaintance of the celebrated Thomas Adams, who was organist of the New Church, Camberwell, for whom young Wesley was often permitted to extemporise a fugue as a concluding voluntary, on account of which favour he ever afterwards held Mr. Adams in high esteem.
In 1829, Dr. Wesley was chosen organist of St. John’s Church, Waterloo Road, whilst still serving the chapel in the Hampstead Road and St. Giles's Church, Camberwell. He appointed his venerable fatner to play for him at St. John's, to whom be gave the salary. Continuing to hold the appointment at Camberwell, in 1830he was chosen organist in the evening at the parish church, Hampton-on-Thames, to reach which place hehad to travel by coach after conducting the morning service at Camberwell.
In 1832 he accepted the post of organist of Hereford Cathedral. Called to associate in his daily duties with the Dean and Chapter, he was cordially welcomed at the deanery, then presided over by the learned Dr. Merewether, whose sister, Marianne, Dr. Wesley married in the year 1885. Shortly after his marriage, and during the same year, be accepted the duties of organist at Exeter Cathedral, in which he continued seven years.
About the year 1841 the professorship of music Edinburgh was vacant, and he was urged apply for that position. To facilitate his efforts in that object be was advised to take his degree of doctor in music, although be had not taken his bachelor's degree. His abilities were held in so much esteem that a special grace was accorded to him, and permitted to take the highest degree, his qualifications to take both being undoubted. He returned from Oxford, and continued his residence at Exeter some months, but in 1842 he accepted the position of organist at the Leeds parish church, when the late Dr. Hook was in the midst of the great work of renovation and church extension which he so nobly carried out in that locality.
The musical professor of Cambridge, Dr. T. Attwood Walmslev, writing from Trinity College in November says:— "Ths universal consent of all musicians in England is that Dr. Wesley is the first among us, both for extraordinary talent and unwearied diligence in improving that talent to the utmost. He not only the first organ player that we have, but also most accomplished musician" Dr. Louis Spohr, writing of Dr. Wesley, from Cassel, January, 1841, after carefully examining all his published works, said "They show, without exception, that he is master of the style and the form of the different species of composition, keeping himself closely to the boundaries which the several kinds demand, not only in sacred things, but also in glees and music for the piano. The sacred music is chiefly distinguished by noble, often even antique style, and rich chosen harmonies, as well as by surprisingly beautiful modulations. Along with this they possess the advantage to be easily sung." Such were the testimonials offered to young man of thirty, when was asked to compete for the chair of music at the University of Edinburgh.
Dr. Wesley in 1849 accepted the position of organist at Winchester Cathedral taking with him his five sons. The school in that city, with which is connected so many honoured names in English history, afforded the facilities required for their education. Two of those sons are now ordained clergymen, and two others are in the medical profession.
During the fifteen years of Dr. Wesley's residence at Winchester he was invited to preside, at the opening of most of the large organs which bad been erected in England.
In 1865 became the organist at Gloucester Cathedral, and in that city he resided till his death.
Dr. Wesley conducted the last musical festival held at Worcester, on which occasion some of his own compositions formed part of the programme.
Many persons will consider that the most important of Dr. Wesley's published books his "Twelve Anthems," which are now generally used in cathedrals and churches throughout England.
During the greater part of his life Dr. Wesley was influenced peculiarly sensitive nervous temperament, which led him to prefer retirement to public life. probably allowed this feeling to rule when it should have been resisted. He died about eleven o'clock on Wednesday morning, his last words being addressed to his sister, Miss Eliza Wesley, when he said, "Let me see the sky." His son, William Ken Wesley, was also with him at the close of life.

Bradford Observer
Saturday 22 April 1876
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Walter Whitby
Walter Whitby
Organist of
1406 - 1407

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Edmund White
Edmund White was "Organist and teacher of the boys." of Chester Cathedral. Entries in the Chapter Books of Chester Cathedral unfortunately bear record of serious irregularities of conduct on his part, and he was dismissed April 9, 1715.
Organist of
1705 - 1715
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In September, 1707, it is ordered.
Whereas complaint bath been made that Edmund White. organist of this Church, being intrusted to Instruct a young gentlewoman of antient and right worthy family in musick, endeavoured to engage her affections by kissing, courting, and the like dalliance unknown to her parents, and motioned a match with her, which particulars when sounded he could not deny, only frivolously pretended the motion of marriage was in jest.
We, therefore, abhorring attempts to steal children from their parents as much as to rob parent of their most valued treasure, doe according to the statute ' do oorrigendo' do depose the said Edmund White from that placer of organist, and also from being master of the choristers, and we doe declare that the station or office of organist and master of the choristers to be actually voyd. L. Fogg. Dean.

Chester Courant
Wednesday 11 March 1885
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Robert White
1538 – 1574
Robert White (or Whyte), was the son in-law of Dr. Christopher Tye.
Very little is known of his biography, but Morley mentions him in his "Introduction" as one of the famous English musicians of his time. He was probably the Robert White who became Organist of Chester Cathedral, 1567, and of Westminster Abbey in 1570 For his degree of Muse B. at Cambridge, he was required to compose a Communion Service to be performed in St. Mary's Church on Commencement Day. He was buried at St. Margaret's, Westminster, November 11, 1574.
An early copy of his Anthem, "O praise God," is in the Ely Cathedral Library, and there are some Latin Services and Anthems by him in MS. in the Library of Christ Church, Oxford.
White's name appears as Organist of Chester Cathedral in June, 1567, the stipend being divided between him and Saywell. Several interesting entries concerning his musical services to the Mystery Plays held at Chester may be found in Dr. J. C. Bridge's interesting account of the Organists of Chester Cathedral (Chester Archæological Society's Journal, Vol. XIX.)
Organist of
1562 - 1566
1567 - 1570
1570 - 1574

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Degrees logo1561. Mus. Bac. — Robert White, Wight or Whytt.
He is mentioned by Morley in his Introduction, and is ranked by him with Orlando Lasso, and as one of the famous Englishmen who have been nothing inferior to the best composers on the Continent.
About 1562 he succeeded Tye as Magister Choristarum of Ely, at a salary of £10 per annum ; and previously to this he had apparently been Organist of West minster Abbey.
Few particulars of his life seem known, and only a few of his compositions have been printed.
There are some in MS. in Ch. Ch. Library. An entry recently found in the marriage register of Trinity Church, Ely, leads to the supposition that White was Christopher Tye's son- in-law.
He died in 1574, and his will describes him as Master of the Choristers of Westminster Abbey.
In a set of his Latin Anthems and Services at Ch. Ch. the following distich occurs : —
Maxima Musarum nostrarum gloria White Tu peris ; aeternum sed tua musa manet.
Extract: A short historical account of the degrees in music at Oxford and Cambridge.
(Williams, C. F. Abdy)
William Henry White
c.1822 - 25th May 1852
William Henry White was educated in the choir of St. Patrick's, and also sang In the Chapel Royal Dublin when a boy.
Organist of
Chapel of Dublin Castle, 1836 to 1845.
1844 - 1852
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Logo, Newspaper article DEATH OF WILLIAM WHITE, ORGANIST OF ST. PATRICK'S CATHEDRAL
It Is our melancholy duty to record the decease of this young and promising musician, who departed this life on Tuesday last, at the early age of 30 years.
Mr. White was educated in the choir of St. Patrick's, and also sang In the Chapel Royal when a boy. Early indications of large musical talents were easily perceived from his performances in both choirs, little White always singing the principal parts with gracefulness and truth, while his modest demeanour and childlike simplicity caused him to be loved by all. For some years previous to his voice changing he practised the organ assiduously , so that when that event took place he was qualified to preside at that instrument in a cathedral.
His rare abilities were soon observed and readily rewarded. On the occasion of the organistship of the Chapel Royal being unfilled. White, though a mere boy, was immediately appointed by the then Dean, Dr. Vic Nolles. He there continued to give every satisfaction for some years, till the organ of St. Patrick's becoming vacant, he was removed thereto, where he continued to perform up to a few weeks before his death.
Those who have heard his performances—and what Cathedral goer has not?—will not readily forget them. For brilliancy of finger, power of combination, judgment In the selection of stops, and sureness and rapidity of pedalling, White had no superior, few equals in the three kingdoms. How he was able to manage such an indifferent Instrument as that of St. Patrick's, with so much skill, has been always a matter surprise to us. Then he was an accomplished musician, with a mind well informed in his art, and taste and good sense to guide him a due appreciation and acknowledgment of the abilities of others. Mr. White, throughout his short career, discharged the duties of a son and brother with a zeal and affection seldom equalled, and only known to his intimates; and, as a friend, he was warm, unselfish, and obliging—ever ready to assist, by his advice and talents, his less gifted musical brethren, without ostentation or display; for he was unassuming and modest to a fault.
His remains were attended to their last resting-place in Mount Jerome cemetery, on Friday morning, by the greater portion of the musical professors of Dublin, and a host of friends, all of whom respected and loved him; for who would not have loved poor White ?

Dublin Evening Mail - Monday 31 May 1852
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John Bernard Wilkes
c.1785 – c.1869
John Bernard Wilkes was a Student of the Royal Academy of Music, 1842-1846.
Composer of the tune "Lyte" to "Far from my heavenly home," in "Hymns Ancient and Modern."
Organist of
Monkland Church, near Leominster
St. David's, Merthyr Tydvil
1861 - 1865

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The first modern organist of Llandaff Cathedral was John Bernard Wilkes (1861-65). I say "modern" because ancient organists were as unlike the cathedral players of to-day as water is to wine.
Wilkes was the first of several Llandalf men who shed lustre on their profession. His tune to "Far from my heavenly home," in "Hymns Ancient and Modern," will. always live

Western Mail
Thursday 22 November 1900
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Charles Lee Williams
1st May 1852 - 29th Aug 1935
Charles Lee Williams was born at Winchester, May 1st, 1852. Chorister in New College, Oxford. Pupil of Dr. G. B. Arnold, and Assistant-Organist of Winchester Cathedral.
Music Master of St. Columba's College, Rathfarnham, 1872.
Conductor of the Gloucester Festivals, 1883-1895. Resigned at Gloucester owing to ill-health, 1897.
An Examiner for the Associated Board of the Royal Academy of Music and Royal College of Music.
Composer of Cantatas, Church Music, Part-songs, Organ pieces, The Gloucester Chimes arranged for the pianoforte, Songs, Etc.
Joint compiler, with H. Godwin Chance, M.A., of the latest edition of "Annals of the Three Choirs." Author of a pamphlet entitled "Among the Isles of Greece."
Organist of
Upton Church, Torquay, 1870
1872 - 1875
1876 - 1882
1882 - 1897
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Degrees logo1885
Mus. Bac. — Charles Lee Williams, New Coll.
Extract: A short historical account of the degrees in music at Oxford and Cambridge.
(Williams, C. F. Abdy)

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Logo, Newspaper article Obituary.
DEATH OF DR. LEEWILLIAMS
WELL-KNOWN GLO'SHIRE CONDUCTOR AND COMPOSER
The "Echo" regrets to announce the death Dr. Charles Lee- Williams, formerly organist of Gloucester Cathedral and conductor the Three Choirs Festival and a distinguished composer, which took place at his residence, St. Omar, Reservoir-road, Gloucester, in the early hours of this morning.
By his death Gloucestershire loses one whose name is held in the highest esteem in the musical circles of the nation and overseas, and is also the poorer for the passing of a most charming person.
Dr Lee-Williams, who celebrated his 84th birthday in May of this year, has been until recently very active for his years. A fortnight ago his health began to fail, and he took to his bed. His death was peaceful, and he passed away in his sleep.
Born at Winchester on May 1, 1851, he was the fifth son of the Rev. David Williams, LL.D., rector of Alton Barnes and Alton Priors, Wiltshire. Having in early boyhood displayed musical talent of an exceptional kind, ne was placed in the choir of New College, Oxford, where he served for four years as a chorister.
When only 15 years of age he was appointed organist to the parish church of Ovington, near Winchester.
In 1882 he was elected organist at Gloucester in succession to Mr. C. H. Lloyd. Outside the cathedral there were some who, while recognising Dr. Lee Williams' great ability, felt he was too young to act as conductor at the Three Choirs Festival at Gloucester as required the appointment.
HEALTH CAUSES RESIGNATION

At his first musical meeting in the following year, however, the test was applied the new organst and the result silenced objections for ever. In 1862. for reasons of health, Lee Williams resigned the post of cathedral organist - a course which evoked universal regret.
Dr. Lee-Williams was prolific and distinguished composer and took high rank for his sacred music, while he also responsible for many notable part songs, carols, and tor services and other works.
He rendered valuable service to local and musical societies on which held office, and 1929 his services to music, and especially to the Three Choirs Festival, were signally honoured when the Archbishop Canterbury conferred upon him the degree of Doctor of Music.
A man of charming personality he was held in great affection by all who knew him.
He leaves one son, Mr. Owen Lee-Williams. He married a daughter of Mr. W. P. Price one time M.P. for Gloucester. He came to live at St. Stephen's Manor, Cheltenham, and resided there until early in 1906, when he went to Tuffley. near Gloucester.
Dr. Lee-Williams conducted the festivals of the Three Choirs held at Gloucester from 1883 to 1895 inclusive, and took part in many others at Worcester and Hereford, on various occasions works by him, generally specially composed, were written for the Three Choirs, and performed at their festivals. Such works included the eight-part song "twilight" (1885); "Last Night at Bethany" (1889) church cantata. "A Dedication" (1895); "Magnificat" and "Nunc Dimittia" (1893); short cantata "Harvest Song" (1899); unaccompanied motets, "A Festival Hymn" (1904); and "The Lord's Prayer" (1910); and the anthem, "Thou wilt keep Him"(1922).

Gloucestershire Echo
Thursday 29 August 1935
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George Ebenezer Williams
1783 - 17th Apr 1819
George Ebenezer Williams was Born 1783.
Chorister in St. Paul's Cathedral. For some time Assistant-Organist at the Temple and (to Dr. Arnold) at Westminster Abbey.
Died April 17, 1819. Buried in the South Cloister.
Composer of Chants, Sanctuses. Etc.
Author Of "An Introduction to the Art of Playing on the Pianoforte," "Exercises for the Pianoforte," Etc.
Organist of
Philanthropic Chapel, St. George's Road, 1805
1814 - 1819
George Ebenezer Williams George Ebenezer Williams
George Ebenezer Williams

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Thomas Williams
Thomas Williams There is an Anthem by him, "Arise, arise," in the Ely Collection, and two others in the books of King's College, Cambridge.
Organist of
- 1680

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Extract: A short historical account of the degrees in music at Oxford and Cambridge.
(Williams, C. F. Abdy)
Archibald Wayet Wilson
1869 - 1950
Archibald Wayet Wilson was born at Pinchbeck, Lincolnshire, 1869.
Student at the Royal College of Music under Slr Walter Parratt, Sir F. Bridge, Etc.
Organ Scholar at Keble College, Oxford, 1890. Music Master, Temple Grove, 1894.
Composer of Church Music, a Choral Ballad, Part-songs, Etc.
Author "The Chorales: Their Origin And Influence,"
Organist of
St. Paul's, East Moulsey, 1888.
St. John's, St. Leonard's, 1896
1898 - 1901
1901 - 1919 1919 -
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Degrees logo1889
Mus. Bac. — Archibald Wayet Wilson, Keble Coll.
Extract: A short historical account of the degrees in music at Oxford and Cambridge.
(Williams, C. F. Abdy)

Logo, Newspaper article HORBLING
Former Vicar's son.
The death has occurred at Prestwick. Manchester. of Dr. Archibald Wayet Wilson, aged 79.
Fifth son of the late Rev. Plumpton Stravenson Wilson. Vicar of Horbling from 1876 to 1909
He was choirmaster and organist at Manchester Cathedral for 24 years, and is the last of a talented family of six sons and three daughters, all of whom were well-known to the older residents of Horbllng and district.

Grantham Journal
Friday 01 September 1950
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Logo, Newspaper article SOCIETY AND PERSONAL
Dr Archibald Wayet, Wilson, organist Ely Cathedral, has been appointed, organist, of the, Manchester Cathedral, in succession Mr Sydney H. Nicholson, who has been appointed to succeed Sir. Frederick Bridge as organist , of Westminster Abbey.

Aberdeen Press and Journal
Friday 04 October 1918
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Michael Wise
1638 - 24th Aug 1687
Michael Wise was born at Salisbury, 1638.
Chorister in the Chapel Royal, and afterwards a Gentleman of the same, 1675.
According to the Salisbury Cathedral Records there appears to have been some trouble between Wise and the authorities there in connection with his duties, and on April 20, 1679, one MITTERNACHT was appointed to play as his deputy, his salary being deducted from that of Wise. Fines are recorded against the latter, on several occasions for irregular attendance.
Appointed Almoner and Master of the Choristers at St. Paul's Cathedral, 1687.
He was a man of very quick temper, and was killed in a quarrel with the midnight watch, August 24, 1687. *
Composer of Church Music.
"He is said to have been in great favour with Charles ll., and being appointed to attend him in progress, claimed, as King's Organist for the time, the privilege of playing to his Majesty on the organ, at whatever church he went."—(Burney's "History of Music.") On one occasion, however, he incurred the King's displeasure by interrupting a sermon with a voluntary of his own.
Notwithstanding his hasty temper, he seems to have exhibited a character of some pleasantry, for we are told that when in Charles ll.'s reign he was asked to set his hand to a petition of which he did not approve (it was for the sitting of the Parliament), he wittily answered, "No, gentlemen, that is not my business ; but I'll set a tune to it an you please."
* The particulars of his death are said to have been these: "He had quarrelled with his wife on some trivial matter, and rushed out of his house. The watchman met him while he was boiling with rage, and commanding him to stand and give an account of himself, he struck the guardian of the peace to the ground, who in return aimed a blow at his assailant with his bill, which broke his skull, of the consequence whereof he died." (Hawkins's "History of Music."; )
Organist of
1668 - 1687

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Daniel Joseph Wood
25th Aug 1849 - 27th Aug 1919
Daniel Joseph Wood was born at Brompton near Chatham, August 25, 1849.
Chorister in Rochester Cathedral, and afterwards Assistant-Organist there.
Conductor of the Western Counties Musical Association, 1877.
Died August 27, 1919.
Composer of Church Music. Organ pieces, Etc.
Organist of
Holy Trinity, New Brompton (Kent), 1864
Parish Church, Cranbrook, 1866
Parish Church, Lee, 1868
Parish Church, Boston (Lincs.), 1869
1875 - 1876
1876 - 1919

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Degrees logo1874
Mus. Bac. — Daniel Joseph Wood, New Coll.
Extract: A short historical account of the degrees in music at Oxford and Cambridge.
(Williams, C. F. Abdy)

Logo, Newspaper article Death of
DR. WOOD,
EXETER CATHEDRAL ORGANIST
. We regret to announce the death of Dr. Daniel Joseph Wood, who has been organist of Exeter Cathedral since 1876.
The sad event took place at his residence, in the Close, yesterday. Deceased had been failing health for some while, but only during the last three weeks was he confined to his bedroom, the immediate cause of death being heart trouble.
Deceased was under the medical care of Mr. C. E. Bell, the family physician. Sir Henry Davy being called in for consultation days since.
Dr. Wood had a most charming manner, and was much beloved by a very wide circle of friends.
The deceased was born at Brompton, near Chatham, on August 25th 1849, and was, therefore, 70 years of age. As a boy he entered the choir of Rochester Cathedral, where his fellow choristers included tne late Joseph Maas and Dr. Joseph C. Bridge. eldest brother the latter, Sir Frederiek. Bridge, left the choir just beiore Dr. Wood joined.
After having been deputy-organist of Rochester Cathedral Dr. wood held, in succession, the post of organist at Holy Trinity Church, Old Brompton. Cranbrook Parish Church ; Lee Parish Church; Boston (Lincolnshire) Parish Church; and Chichester Cathedral. In 1876, upon the death of Mr. Alfred Angel, Dr. Wood was appointed organist of Exeter Cathedral, which post he worthily held until his death.
He was a Fellow the Royal College Organists, and Bachelor of Music in the University of Oxford, and in 1896, he received the Degree of Doctor of Music Cantab.
As conductor of musical Associations Dr. Wood extended the scope his artistic interests beyond the Cathedral precincts, and his influence on music in the city and surroundings of Exeter was distinctly for its progress and well-being, in fact, he always furnished proof of his sound and thorough ability, and of the magnetism his artistic temperament. Not only did deceased hold the important post of organist of the Cathedral for over 40 years, but he was well-known composer of church music and organ pieces. He took a prominent part in the formation of the Western Counties' Musical Association, and was the first conductor to Mr. Henry Leslie. About 25 years ago. when the Association amalgamated with the Exeter Oratorio Society, Dr. Wood became joint conductor to Dr. Edwards.
Deceased was also appointed conductor of the Exeter Orchestral Socioty on the resignation of Mr. Reg. Moore. He was also a Licentiate of Trinity College, London, composer of excellent anthems and chants, and editor of the Hymnal Companion and Chant Book Companion.
The Psalms pointed, as used in the Cathedral, together with the "Canticles, Proper Psalms, Athanasian Creed, etc ", were edited by Dr. Wood, and published in 1878. The pointing in the Cathedral had previously been purely traditional, and though it was considered inadvisable to change the method of dividing the words for chanting, still it was thought that that method might carried out with more precision and uniformity those divisions of the words, for which both choir and congregation had hitherto to depend on memory, were plainly set full print. The object of the work was not to introduce any new thing, into the service, but to confirm and strengthen what already existed.
Several years since deceased took great interest in the restorationof the Cathedral organ, at a cost of £3500.
Dr. Wood leaves a widow, who has been in London for some time for the benefit of her health, and two daughters. Mrs Kenyon, of London, and Mrs. Barnes Topsham— with whom the greatest sympathy is extended in their sad bereavement.
Although Dr. Wood suffered from heart trouble for a considerable time, his death yesterday was unexpected, he being suddenly attacked by a heart spasm, and passed away immediately. During the absence Mrs. Wood, who went to London a short time since to undergo an operation, the Doctor has been under the care of Mrs Barnes his second daughter. Mrs. Kenyon being in London with her mother.
Owing to a serious nervous breakdown the deceased went for a cruise in the Mediterranean about 9 years ago and derived considerable benefit.
Deceased was a most talented musician and one of the best known organists in the country. He was acknowledged authority on Bach and other great composers, and his services were eagerly sought after by all associated with music. For some time deceased was in charge of the choral music at the Exeter Maynard School. After referring Dr. Wood's resourcefulness and judgment, a writer, a few years since, remarked: "Beyond them shows untiring energy When you come to think of it, you cannot recall an occasion on which you saw him lazying. If he wasn't playing, he was talking; he wasn't talking he was walking and with purpose; if was doing neither was thinking; and if he wasn't thinking he was doing something else requiring mental effort. Isn't that about the truth?" But there is one thing about his conversation— you never hear him talk of or for Dr. Wood. To listen him you would have no idea at all that Dr. Wood was more substantial entity than the Mr. Harris of whom Sairey Gamp was wont to express the opinion that "there ain't sich person."
The Exeter Cathedral organist afraid that the world will rate him too highly, and yet try how he might cannot prevent his natural aptitude and his many acquisitions from their own tale. He succeeds in spite himself as it were; his bushel of modesty is quite ineffectual to hide his light which shines before all men with wuom he is associated. "He is persevering; his direction the Western Counties" Musical Association's festivals testify to that, for no half-hearted unenthusiastic conductor could have brought them to such a high degree of excellence and power. Yet is not the rushing order of mankind. He carries with him dignity born of early association with Cathedral minstrelsy, and this same feature is manifested in his playing. There is nothing showy in his style but rather the majesty that is suggested wherever the word "Cathedral" used as an adjective— ' Cathedral tone,' ' Cathedral glass,' etc. He is, in brief, the right man in the right place. Under his guidance the musical portion of the services St. Peter's is solid without being ponderous; bright without being procacious. He feels that the traditions of his post—extending back for hundreds of years, and including among its many worthy holders the late Dr. Wesley, perhaps the greatest English Church musician of this century—-demands something more than purely mechanical nimbleness, and very successfully gives effect to the inborn conviction.
At the close of evensong at the Cathedral, yesterday, the Dead March from "Saul" was played. The funeral will take place on Monday at noon.

Exeter and Plymouth Gazette
Thursday 28 August 1919
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Richard Wood

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William Woodcock
1754 - 1825
William Woodcock was born at Canterbury, 1754.
Chorister in Canterbury Cathedral. Assistant-Organist of the Cathedral and St. John's College, Oxford, 1778-1784.
Lay-Clerk of the Cathedral, and of Magdalen, New, and St. John's Colleges, resigning the two latter appointments on becoming Organist of New College.
Died at Oxford, 1825.
Composer of Church Music.
Organist of
1799 - 1825
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Degrees logo1806
Mus. Bac. — William Woodcock, of New Coll.
Born 1754, Organist and Singing Man of New Coll., 1799-1825 ; Clerk of Magd. Coll., 1784-1818.
He died in 1825.
Extract: A short historical account of the degrees in music at Oxford and Cambridge.
(Williams, C. F. Abdy)

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On Thursday night died, after a short illness, in the 72d year of his age, William Woodcock, Bachelor in Music, many years organist on New College, in this University

Oxford Journal
Saturday 30 April 1825
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Norman Charles Woods
22nd Jun 1882 - 18th Aug 1944
Norman Charles Woods was born at Gosport, June 22, 1882.
1921 a Priest in Orders and a Minor Canon of Winchester Cathedral.
Organist of
Parish Church, Chiswick, 1906
Parish Church, Ludlow, 1908
1911 - 1912
Holy Trinity, Southport, 1913
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Logo, Newspaper article DEATHS
On August 9th, Norman Charles Woods, priest, M.A., Mus.B.. F.R.C.O-Vicar- St. John’s Netting Hill and formerly curate of Biggleswade.

Biggleswade Chronicle
Friday 18 August 1944
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Leonard Woodson
Leonard Woodson was a Lay Clerk of St. George's Chapel, Windsor.
According to the Chapter Acts of St. George's Chapel (April 5, 1605), "It is decreed, at the request of Nathanaell Giles, esquier, Master of the Choristers of this free Chapel, that Leonard Woodeson, one of the singing-men of the same, shall have the teaching, keeping, dieting, ordering, and lodging of the said choristers for so long time as it shall be thought meet by the Dean and Chapter. And whomsoever the said Dean and Chapter shall mislike (sic) therewith then upon one quarter's warning from them to be given to the said Nathanaell he shall take them again to his own ordering and government as before."
There is a Te Deum in D minor by him in Barnard's Collection, and two Anthems— "Arise, O Lord God" and "Hear, O Lord, hear my prayer" are included in a MS. collection of Church Music in the Library of the Royal College of Music. The words of the first-named Anthem are given in Clifford's "Divine Service and Anthems," 1664 edition.
Organist of
1615 - 1641?
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Richard Woodward
1744 - 22Nd Nov 1777
Richard Woodward was the son of Richard Woodward, a Vicar Choral of St. Patrick's Cathedral.
He was born in Dublin, 1744.
Vicar Choral of St, Patrick's Cathedral, 1772.
Master of the Choristers at Christ Church and St. Patrick's Cathedrals.
Died November 22, 1777. Buried in Christ Church Cathedral. On his monument is inscribed his Prize Canon "Let the words of my mouth."
Composer of Church Music, Songs, His Church Music, which included a Service in B flat and seven Anthems, was published in London in a folio volume, and dedicated to Archbishop Smyth.
Organist of
1765 - 1777

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Nicholas Wootton
- 16th Apr 1700
Nicholas Wootton was admitted Organist and Lay Clerk, Canterbury Cathedral, December 1, 1692.
In April, 1698, he was summoned to appear before the Chapter of Canterbury Cathedral "to answer to such matters as shall then be objected to him." Wootton seems to have failed to comply with this order, as on June 27 it was resolved.that "forasmuch as Nicholas Wootton, Organist of this Church, hath left and deserted that place," and for other misdemeanours, "he be removed, and the place be void."
Died April 16, 1700. Buried in the North Aisle of the Cathedral.
Organist of
1692 - 1698
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Charles Wren
Charles Wren appears as Organist in the Rochester Cathedral Treasurer's book of 1672
In the 'Red' Book of 1661 it was "Ordered that Mr. William Rothwell for the reversion of the Organist's place at Mr. John Heath's death should have a Patent." William Wrothwell had a Patent for a Petty Canon's place in 1662; no mentioned of him as Organist.
Organist of
?1672 - ?
1673 - 1679
>
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Robert Wren
-1691
Robert Wren was probably a son of Charles Wren, Organist of Rochester Cathedral.
"On the same day, December 9, 1675, the Chapter elected Robert Wren, 'a member of this Church,' as Chomley's successor. At the time of his election, Wren was one of the Lay Clerks of the Cathedral."
Died 1691. Buried in Rochester Cathedral Cloisters.
Organist of
1675 - 1691
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John Wyrnal
John Wyrnal is buried under the Window of the Clock (rose window), in the South Transept of York Cathedral.
The following is the inscription on his tomb

Muficus et logicus Wyrnal hic jacet ecce Johannes
Organa namque quafi fecerat ille loqui.

Translated thus in Hawkins's "History" :-
Musician and Logician both,
John Wyrnal lieth here ;
Who made the organs erst to speak
As if, or as it were.
And in Drake's "Eboracum" :— Here lies John Wyrnal, so well skilled in the Art of Music and speech, that he made even the Organ speak.
Organist of
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John Matthew Wilson Young
17th Dec 1822 - 4th Mar 1897
John Matthew Wilson Young
Was Organist and Master of the Choristers at Lincoln Cathedral.
Born at Durham, December 17, 1822.
Chorister in Durham Cathedral, and afterwards pupil of Henshaw and Assistant-Organist there.
For some time Professor of Music at the Training School, York. Resigned from post of organist Lincoln Cathedral 1895.
Died at West Norwood, March 4, 1897. Buried in the Cemetery, East Gate, Lincoln.
Composer of a Sacred Cantata, "The Return of Israel to Palestine," Church Music, Etc. Compiler of the Lincoln Psalter.
Under Young's régime the musical services at Lincoln Cathedral greatly improved. The organ was considerably enlarged, and pedals were for the first time used.
Organist of
1850 - 1895

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Logo, Newspaper article DEATH
YOUNG. — On the 4th inst., at 36, St. Julian's Farm road, West Norwood, John Matthew Wilson Young, late Organist of Lincoln Cathedral, aged 75.

Norwood News
Saturday 13 March 1897
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Logo, Newspaper article CATHEDRAL SINGING
(Extract)
I want to thank Dr. Slater for so generously alluding to Mr, John Matthew Wilson Young and the way which psalms were sung in Lincoln Cathedral during his regime-
As chorister in the cathedral from 1888 to 1895, 1 can corroborate everything Dr. Slater said about my old and well beloved organist and choirmaster (martinet as he was) Not only people from outlying districts would come to the services specially to hear the psalm singing, but parties of Americans, who had made the pilgrimage to our cathedral were enthralled for the same reason.
Dozens of times I have heard Mr. Young commence a full rehearsal by reading tributes from all sorts and conditions of men, tributes relating not only to the singing of the psalms, by the way. but the wonderful tight and shade in unaccompanied eight-part anthems such as "Why rage fiercely the heathen" and "Judge me, 0 God "(Mendelssohn), alas never now sung in Lincoln.
I well remember the late Sir John Stainer, organist at St. Paul’s Cathedral, paying as a glowing tribute on the singing the first-mentioned anthem and the Morning Psalm, set to a descriptive single chant by Mr. Young. As Dr, Slater says, Mr. Young's accompaniments to the psalms were inspiration and showed the master and reverent hand.
ERNEST PULLEIN. Organist and Choirmaster, St. Martin’s. Swanpool. Lincoln.

Lincolnshire Echo
Tuesday 26 October 1937
(www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk)